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Class No. ^ Book ^ T °- 

LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE LIBRARY 

Ac. No. 6153 





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BULLETIN 


August , 1933 


of the 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1933-1934 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 

» 6153 

DEPARTMENT 

OF 

LOWELL EVENING TEXTILE SCHOOL 


LIC ATI ON OF THIS DOCUMENT APPROVED BY THE COMMISSION ON ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

7-33. Order 8934. 


TRUSTEES OF THE LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 
Officers. 

ROYAL P. WHITE, Chairman 

FREDERICK A. FLATHER, CHARLES H. EAMES, 

Vice-Chairman. Clerk. 

Trustees 

On the Part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Dr. Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education. 

On the Part of the City of Lowell. 

Hon. Charles H. Slowey, Mayor of Lowell. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1933. 

Royal P. White, Lowell, Agent, Stirling Mills, class of 1904. 

Edward B. Wentworth, 165 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Philip S. Marden, Lowell, Editor-in-chief, Courier-Citizen. 

Charles W. Churchill, Lowell, Manager, Churchill Manufacturing Company, 
Inc., class of 1906. 


For Term Ending June 30, 1934. 

Thomas T. Clark, North Billerica, Treasurer, Talbot Mills, class of 1910. 

Joseph A. Gagnon, Lowell, President of The Gagnon Company. 

George M. Harrigan, Lowell, President, Lowell Trust Compan}\ 

Stanley H. Wheelock, Uxbridge, President and Treasurer, Stanley Woolen 
Company, class of 1905. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1935. 

Frederick A. Flather, Lowell, Treasurer, Boott Mills, Boston corporation, mills 
at Lowell. 

Henry A. Bodwell, Andover, Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, Boston, class of 
1900. 

Edward M. Abbot, Westford, Manufacturer, Abbot Worsted Company, class 
of 1904. 

Mrs. H. L. Boutwell, 209 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Irving Southworth, Andover, Agent, Pacific Mills, Boston Corporation, mills at 
Lawrence. 


LOWELL EVENING TEXTILE SCHOOL. 


By Act of the Legislature of 1928, the name of the Lowell Textile School was 
changed to Lowell Textile Institute, and the evening classes are organized and are 
to be hereafter operated as a department of the Institute to be known as the Lowell 
Evening Textile School. 


September 28, Thursday 
October 5, Thursday . 
October 9, Monday . 
November 30, Thursday 
December 1, Friday . 
December 22, Friday . 


January 4, Thursday . 
March 9, Friday 
April 10, Tuesday 


CALENDAR. 

1933. 

. Registration. 

Registration 

. Opening of evening school. 

Thanksgiving recess. No classes. 

. End of first term. 

1934. 

. Opening of second term. 

. Closing of evening school. 

. Graduation. 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 


93 


Charles Holmes Eames, S.B Billerica. 

President. 

Louis Atwell Olney, S.B., M.S., ScD. . . .118 Riverside Street. 

Professor of Chemistry; in charge of Department of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
Edgar Harrison Barker . . . . . .9 Mount Hope Street. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Wool Yarns. 

Arthur Andrew Stewart ...... 56 Robbins Street. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Finishing. 

Hermann Henry Bachmann .... 146 Parkview Avenue. 

Professor of Textile Design; in charge of Department of Design and Weaving. 
Lester Howard Cushing, A.B., Ed.M. ... 10 Walden Street. 

Professor of History and Economics; in charge of Department of Languages, 
History and Economics; Secretary of the Faculty. 

Herbert James Ball, S.B., B.C.S. . . . 119 Wentworth Avenue. 

Professor of Textile Engineering; in charge of Department of Textile Engi- 
neering and Accountancy. 

Gilbert Roscoe Merrill, B.T.E. .... 364 Varnum Avenue. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Cotton Yarns and Knitting. 
Stewart Mackay ....... North Chelmsford. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Design. 

John Charles Lowe . . . . . . .161 Dracut Street. 

Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

Martin John Hoellrich .... 30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence. 

Assistant Professor of Weaving. 

Elmer Edward Fickett, B.S 

Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Frederick Steere Beattie, Ph.B. .... 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

Harold Canning Chapin, Ph.D 

Assistant Professor of General Chemistry. 

Charles Lincoln Howarth, B.T.C. 

Assistant Professor of Dyeing. 

Percy Charles Judd, B.S. ..... 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Harry Chamberlain Brown, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

James Guthrie Dow, A.B. . . . . . .11 Robbins Street. 

Assistant Professor of English. 

Cornelius Leonard Glen ..... R.F.D. No. 1, Tewksbury. 
Assistant Professor of Finishing. 

A. Edwin Wells, B.T.E. . . 204 Franklin Street, Melrose Highlands. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Russell Lee Brown, B.T.E 59 Bradstreet Avenue. 

Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

Charles Harrison Jack 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 

Albert Greaves Sugden 
I nstructor in Weaving. 

Arthur Joseph Woodbury . 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

Russell Metcalf Fox 

Instructor in Textile Design. 

Charles Arthur Everett, B.T.C 
Instructor in Dyeing. 

James Harrington Kennedy, Jr. 

Instructor in Wool Yarns and Sorting. 

William George Chace, Ph.B. . 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

John Leslie Merrill, B.T.E. ... 2026 Middlesex Street. 

Instructor in Weaving. 


162 Hovey Street . 
285 Foster Street. 
290 Pine Street. 
North Billerica. 
156 Methuen Street. 
272 Merrimack Street. 


R.F.D. No. 1, Pelham, N. H. 

673 School Street. 


41 Morey Street. 
359 Beacon Street. 
Chelmsford. 
177 A Street. 
7 Sanborn Street. 


4 


John Henry Skinkle, S.B 7 Sanborn Street. 


Instructor in Chemistry. 

Franz Evron Baker, B.T.E. 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

Dalton Road, Chelmsford. 

Charles Frederick Edlund, B.S. 

Instructor in Sales Engineering. 

272 Merrimack Street. 


Milton Hindle, B.T.E. . . 24 Highland Avenue, Melrose Highlands. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 


Horton Brown, B.S. . 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

47 Pond Street, Marblehead. 

Elmer Percy Trevors . 

18 Rhodora Street. 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Paul David Petterson 

. Carlisle Street, East Chelmsford. 


Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 

Robert Campbell Wilkie ..... 298 Pawtucket Street. 


Assistant Instructor in Woolen Yarns. 
George Forsythe, 

Assistant Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

199 North Main Street, Andover. 

Raymond Lewis Matthews . 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

298 Pawtucket Street. 


Simon Shapiro 84 Cambridge Street. 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 

Kenneth E. Leslie, .... 9 Nineteenth Avenue, Haverhill. 


Assistant Instructor in ChemistrjL 

Walter Ballard Holt . . . . 

Bursar. 

37 Albert Street. 

Ruth Foote, A.B., S.B. . 

Registrar. 

46 Victoria Street . 

Florence Moore Lancey . 

Librarian. 

46 Victoria Street . 

Helen Gray Flack, S.B. . 

Secretary. 

445 Stevens Street. 

Mona Blanche Palmer . 

Clerk. 

. 685 Westford Street. 

Miriam Kaplan, S.B. . 

Clerk. 

43 Hawthorn Street 

Howard Dexter Smith, Ph.D. 

Evening Instructor in General Chemistry. 

. Dalton Road, Chelmsford. 


Harold Arthur Giffin . . . 2089 Lake view Avenue, Collinsville. 

Evening Instructor in Design. 

Henry Earl McGowan, B.T.E. . . . . . 36 Varney Street. 

Evening Instructor in Mathematics. 

Guy Eugene Branch ........ Forge Village. 

Evening Instructor in Worsted Yarns. 


Clyde F. Barlow, B.S. . 

Evening Instructor in Electricity. 

165 Fort Hill Avenue. 

Edward W. Dooley . 

799 Chelmsford Street. 

Evening Instructor in Show Card Design. 
Vittoria Rosatto . 

63 Bradstreet Avenue. 

Evening Instructor in Freehand Drawing. 

J. Raymond Bradley . 

Evening Instructor in Show Card Design. 

. 29 Paige Street. 

Mollie Marberblatt, . 

Evening Instructor in Freehand Drawing. 

47 Church Street, Lynn, Mass. 

James C. Buzzell 

26 Princeton Boulevard. 

Evening Instructor in Electricity. 

Glen Bowden Caswell, . 

Evening Instructor in Machine Shop. 

32 Hampshire Street. 

Bertha C. Hoellrich . 

Evening Instructor in Freehand Drawing. 

30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence. 


EVENING CLASSES 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Entrance Requirements 

All applicants to the e.vening classes must understand the English language and 
simple arithmetic. Those who are graduates of a grammar or high school are 
admitted upon certificate. Those who cannot present such a certificate are required 
to take examination in the subjects of English and arithmetic. In the examination 
in English a short composition must be written on a given theme, and a certain 
amount must be written from dictation. In the examination in arithmetic the 
applicant must show suitable proficiency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
division, common and decimal fractions, percentage, ratio and proportion. Oppor- 
tunity to register or to take these examinations is offered 'each year, generally on 
the Thursday evenings of the two weeks previous to the opening of the evening 
school. 

Registration 

Before entering the class a student must fill out an attendance card, which can 
be obtained at the office or from the instructors in the various departments. 

Any student who has filed an attendance card and who wishes to change his 
course must notify the office before making the change. 

Sessions. 

The evening classes commence the second Monday of October and continue for 
twenty weeks. The school is open on four evenings each week during the period 
mentioned, except when the school is closed for holiday recesses. 

Supplies. 

Students must provide their own books, stationery, tools, etc., and pay for any 
breakage or damage that they cause. 

Students’ supplies will be sold from the co-operative store every evening school 
night from 6.45 to 8.15 p.m. 

Fees and Deposits. 

All evening courses are free to residents of Lowell. To those outside of Lowell 
the fee is $10 per year for each course of two nights per week. Students taking two 
courses or attending courses requiring more than two nights per week are required 
to pay $15 per year for three nights and $20 for four nights. 

All fees and deposits must he paid in advance. 

All students, whether from Lowell or not, taking Course 411, Chemistry and 
Dyeing Department, are required to make a deposit at the commencement of the 
course — $5 for first-year students, and $10 for second-year students. A deposit of 
$10 will be required of all students taking Course 412, 413 or 414. This is to cover 
the cost of laboratory breakages, chemicals, apparatus, etc., and at the end of the 
year any unexpended balance is returned, or an extra charge made for the excess 
breakage. 

Every student who takes the chemistry and dyeing course must check up his 
desk with the instructor of that department when he leaves the school. Any stu- 
dent not doing so will be charged 50 cents. 

All students taking Machine-Shop Practice will be required to make a deposit 
of $5. Any unexpended balance remaining at the end of the year will be returned 
to the student. 

Report of Standing. 

A report of standing covering the year’s work is sent to all students who attend 
the entire year and take the necessary examinations. 

Certificates. 

The courses of the evening school are varied and arranged to meet the special 
needs of those engaged in the industry. They vary in length from one to four 
years, and at the completion of each course the certificate of the school is awarded, 
provided, however, that the student has been in attendance in the course during 
the year for which the certificate is granted* 


6 

GENERAL EVENING COURSES 

The object of these courses is to give young men of ambition an opportunity 
to obtain instruction in all the branches of science that are allied with their daily 
work. For example, one who is employed as a weaver in a textile mill may obtain 
knowledge of the manufacture of yarn, the production of a design, and the methods 
of finishing a fabric, as well as the manner of its weaving or knitting. In like 
manner the dyer may augment his knowledge of the chemicals and materials he 
is daily handling. The engineer and machinist may acquire a knowledge of the 
mathematics, science of mechanics, electricity and drawing that underlie all the 
work of an engineer. 

It is recognized that the interests of such students lie in a particular field of 
industry, and these courses are designed to bear directly upon the special line, 
and supplement, as far as possible, the practical work in which the student is en- 
gaged during the day. 

In a word, any man having a common school education and the ambition to ad- 
vance in his line may now secure a broad and comprehensive training in the sub- 
jects which will be of vital importance to him in obtaining the goal of his ideal. 

A description of all courses follows. 

COTTON DEPARTMENT. 

110. Cotton Yarns — 3 Years. 

The first year work in cotton yarn manufacture consists of a study of cotton and 
its preparation for market, followed by a study of opening, picking, carding and 
combing. This w r ork consists of lectures on these operations combined with prob- 
lems that are peculiar to each operation such as the drafts used and the production 
of each process as w^ell as the amounts of waste made. Special consideration is 
given to the adjustment and care of these machines and some laboratory demon- 
stration is used to show the manner of adjusting machines for the purpose of con- 
trolling the weight of the product, the amount of work done in a day and the con- 
trol of waste. 

Two evenings per week . 

Cotton. — Before taking up the details of manufacturing cotton into yarn, a 
careful study of its physical characteristics is made. The geographical distribution 
of the areas producing commercial cottons is explained and the characteristics of 
the cottons produced in each are studied. A general explanation of the cultivation 
and harvesting of cotton is made, especially emphasizing the effect of agricultural 
factors on the cotton fiber and hov T these may serve to complicate manufacturing- 
problems. 

The ginning of cotton is considered, showing the yield of lint, the uses of cotton 
seed and the various types of gins and w T hich cottons are commonly ginned on each. 

The intricate system of buying and selling cotton is studied to illustrate the 
problems a mill may meet in procuring cotton. In this connection, special em- 
phasis is placed on the classification of cottons by staple and by grade. 

Opening and Picking. — Instruction in the preliminary operation of opening 
and picking covers the mechanical construction of the machines, their parts and 
adjustments, as fully as the manufacturing results accomplished by the machines. 
This includes such construction details as evener, lap measuring and safety stop 
motions, grids, cleaning trunks and beaters, also operation details w r hich involve 
the adjustment for w r aste, drafts and character of laps. Some time is devoted to 
mixing in its various phases, showdng in addition to improvement in uniformity of 
the product, how cottons are mixed to obtain definite average prices and how dif- 
ferent percentages of color may be obtained by mixing, expecially on the pickers. 

Carding. — The process of carding is considered one of the most important, and 
proper time is devoted to the construction and operation of cards that the student 
may be familiar with the various parts of the card and the function and design of 
each. The construction and application of card clothing, as w r ell as the methods 
of grinding, form a part of the w r ork. Some time is given to a discussion of the 
waste made in carding, the regulation of the amounts of each made and the calcu- 


7 

lation of the percentages. New and special attachments for various purposes are 
brought to the attention of the class, illustrating possible ways of improving carding 
conditions. 

Combing. — The preparation of card sliver for combing by means of the sliver 
lapper and ribbon lapper is thoroughly considered. The combing operation itself 
is studied in considerable detail, emphasizing the general object and operations in 
combing and the specific means employed by various types of combs in performing 
the operations. The calculations in this connection involve the drafts and doub- 
lings necessary to produce the proper lap for the comb, the proper comb drafts, and 
the determination of the per cent of noil produced. 

The second year work includes a study of the drawing and roving processes and 
the calculations that accompany these operations. It consists of lectures on the 
machines and demonstration of their adjustment, showing roll setting, draft and 
twist control, builder adjustment, spacing coils on the bobbin, and tension control. 

One evening per week. 

Drawing. — Under this head is taken up the theory of doublings and their effect 
upon the quality of roving and yarn. Like previous and subsequent processes the 
machine construction forms an important part of the work. Proper stress is paid 
to such subjects as stop motions, drawing rolls and their covering, clearers and 
evener motions. 

Roving Process. — Under this head are studied the various machines known as 
the slubber, intermediate, fine and jack fly frames. Each of the various motions 
of these complicated machines is treated separately and then the group is taken as 
a unit, tying each operation in with the others. Particular attention is paid to the 
subjects of lay and tension because of their importance in producing perfect roving. 
The calculations in this subject involve draft, twist, lay and tension with particular 
attention to the derivation of constants and their use. 

During the third year the time is devoted to a study of ring and mule spinning, 
spooling, winding, twisting and reeling, instruction being given by means of lectures 
and demonstrations. There is also some work done on the combing machine, 
particularly in the nature of its adjustment. In addition to these subjects, some 
time is spent on planning the organization of a cotton mill with a view to showing 
drafts, speeds, productions and number of machines of each kind necessary for the 
production of a given amount of a certain yarn. 

Two evenings per week. 

Ring Spinning. — The consideration of spinning yarn by dhe ring frame method 
involves a knowledge of the uses to which the yarn is to be put and subsequent 
methods of handling, that proper roving may be selected, suitable amounts of 
draft and twist provided, correct size of rings and travelers selected, and building 
motions suitably adjusted. Yarn defects are studied with reference to the cause 
and remedy, necessitating references to many of the earlier operations. 

Mule Spinning.— This method of spinning is very different from that of the 
ring frame, and the mechanical details are more complicated. The student is 
furnished with a new means of producing yarns, and can compare the relative 
advantages of each method. A thorough understanding of mule spinning is per- 
haps more a study of mechanical motions and their functions. This results almost 
invariably in assisting the student to understand previous processes and machines 
better because of his work on the mule. It is the object to make clear to the stu- 
dent’s mind the principles underlying the construction and operation of the parts 
that, control the drawing, twisting, backing off and winding, together with such 
special motions and devices as are used upon the modern mule. 

Spooling and Winding. — The discussions under this head cover the treatment 
of single yarns, ring or mule spun, in preparation for twisting, comparing the 
relative merits of spooling with multiple winding on tubes, and beaming for special 
twisters. Winders are also considered as a means of preparing yarn packages for 
sale yarns. 

Twisting. — Because of the similarity to ring spinning, the emphasis is more on 
the manufacturing part of the work, although there are a few peculiar features of a 
mechanical nature. The twisting of various regular ply yarns, the making of 


8 

numerous fancy yams and the principles underlying the production of unlimited 
patterns is taken up here. The use of special twisters and other apparatus for 
cords and ropes is considered at this point. 

WOOLEN AND WORSTED DEPARTMENT. 

210. Worsted Yarns — 2 Years. 

During the first year instruction consists of a lecture course on the various kinds 
of wool fibers, trade terms, sorting, scouring, carbonizing, etc., also a course in 
carding and the calculations involved in the mechanism of the machines, and a 
course covering gilling and combing and the processes of top making. 

Raw Materials. — A study of raw materials which enter into the manufacture 
of woolen or worsted yams, or are made into yarns by processes similar to those 
employed in the manufacture of woolen and worsted yarns, would include silk, 
mohair, alpaca, vicuna, cashmere, camel’s hair and cotton. In connection with 
these are considered shoddy, noils and extracts. • 

Wool Sorting. — Familiarity with the various grades and kinds of w’ool is ob- 
tained by lecture. The various characteristics and properties are explained, as 
are also trade terms, such as picklock, XXX, XX, 34-blood, M-blood, 34-blood, 
delaine, braid, etc. Some skill is acquired in the estimation of shrinkage and in 
judging the spinning qualities. 

Wool Scouring. — The object of scouring and the methods employed are ex- 
plained, and this involves the consideration of soaps and chemicals used in washing; 
also the waste products and their utilization. A demonstration of a commercial 
quantity of wool is scoured by machines that are made similar in operation to 
regular commercial machines. A study is made of the effect of the hardness of 
water upon soap. At the same time the use of driers, their operation and regulation, 
is taken up, and the methods of carbonizing wool, noils, burr waste, rags, etc., are 
studied and explained. 

Carding. — The different systems of carding wool, depending on whether it is 
to be made into woolen or worsted yarns, are fully explained, as well as the con- 
struction, setting and operation of cards. A part of this work consists of a study 
of card clothing, its construction, application and grinding. 

Top Making and Combing. — This branch takes up, besides the carding of the 
wool on a worsted card, the preparing processes, backwashing, also gilling of the 
stock before and after combing. The construction of the gill boxes and combs is 
studied by lectures. Later, quantities of stock are made into top and then into 
yarn. 

Three evenings per week. 

The second year is devoted to detail study of the English and French systems of 
worsted yarn manufacture. 

The Noble, Lister and French combs are studied, and the various calculations 
to determine draft, noiling, productions, etc., are made. 

Drawing and Spinning. — The equipment in the laboratory offers opportunity 
to make worsted yarn by either the Bradford or open drawing system or by the 
French system. The process includes the various machines in the successive steps 
of making Bradford spun yarn, and the functions of the different machines are 
studied. In the latter, or French system, the stock is run through the drawing 
machines, and the roving spun into yarn on the worsted mule. The same method 
of studying the mechanism and operations of these machines is followed as in the 
case of previous methods of instruction. The student by pursuing this course can 
compare the different methods of yarn manufacture and note the results of each. 

With the instruction in spinning by the Bradford system is given work on the 
twisters and the effects that may be produced. 

Three evenings per week. 

211. Woolen Yarns — 2 Years. 

During the first year instruction consists of a lecture course on the various kinds 
of wool fibers, trade terms, sorting, scouring, carbonizing, etc., also of a course on 
carding, and the calculations involved in the mechanism of the machines. 

Two evenings per week. 


9 

The second year continues the instruction on carding and then takes up a course 
on the mule and woolen yam spinning. 

Burr Picking, Mixing, Oils and Emulsions. — The use of burr pickers in 
cleaning wool and the use of mixing pickers in making color blends is covered by 
lecture and demonstration. Under the subject of oils and emulsions are taken up 
the characteristics of various oils and the means employed to test them. 

Woolen Mule. — The student studies thoroughly the operation of the mule as 
a whole, and acquaints himself with the various principal mechanisms, as, for 
example, the backing off and winding motions, the quadrant, builder-rail, faller 
regulation, etc. 

Two evenings per week. 

TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING DEPARTMENT. 

311. Cotton Design — 3 Years. 

During the first year instruction is given in elementary designing, starting with 
all the foundation weaves which may be used in fabrics such as the plain weave, 
rib weaves, basket weaves, twill weaves, satin weaves, granite weaves, etc. Com- 
bination and derivative weaves are made up from the aforesaid weaves. Fancy 
and figured weaves, in most cases originated by the student, are produced. Color 
effects, which are so essential in fabrics, obtainable from the different weaves, as 
stated above, in which the color arrangement of warp and filling create the pattern, 
are thoroughly considered. Not only the designing, but also harness drafting 
and the making of dobby chains for any type of weave is taken up. 

Cloth analysis is considered in conjunction with designing, as a designer must 
know the kind of fabric he is designing, what material and what size of yarns are 
to be used, and how heavy and costly the cloth is to be. The various topics dis- 
cussed are the sizes or counts of yams made from all kinds of fibers, such as cotton, 
woolen, worsted, silk, rayon, jute and yams of other vegetable fibers. Their 
relative length to the pound is determined in the single two or more ply, mixed 
yarns, novelty yams and fancy yams, in the American or English system. The 
same is given in the metric system. Problems involving the take-up of yams in 
the weaving and finishing process are given. Samples of cloth are picked apart 
to determine their weaves and general construction. 

Two evenings per week. 

In the second year cloth analysis and design are combined in lecture and practice, 
starting with plain and leading into the more fancy cotton dobby fabrics. A great 
variety of samples of cloth are used in class work to determine ends and picks per 
inch, shrinkage in warp and filling, and the number of reed and reed widths necessary 
for eventual reconstruction. The yarn numbers of warp and filling are determined 
by aid of fine balances. The amount of warp and filling necessary for a piece of 
goods is calculated and the weight of a whole piece as well as the number of yards 
per pound are determined. 

Two evenings per week. 

In the third year more elaborate cloths are considered, both in designing and 
analysis, cloths in which extra warp or extra filling, or both, are used. Warp 
backed, filling backed, double, triple or more plied fabrics are taken up, such as 
marseilles, quiltings, pique, suspenders, narrow webbings, velveteens, fancy vel- 
veteens, velvets, corduroys, Bedford cords, plushes, leno, in fact, anything a student 
may suggest which might help him in his work. 

Two evenings per week. 

312. Woolen and Worsted Design — 3 Years. 

This course covers the design and analysis of standard woolen and worsted fabrics 
and is intended for those who wish to specialize in this branch of textile fabric 
manufacture. Special and fancy fabrics are studied to the extent that time will 
permit. 

During th e first year instruction is given in the subject of classification of fabrics, 
use of points or design paper, plain fabrics, intersection, twills and their derivation, 
sateen, basket and rib weaves, checks and stripes, fancy weaves, including figured 


10 

and colored effects; producing chain and draw from design, and vice versa; extending 
and extracting weaves. 

The analysis of samples is taken up in a systematic manner, illustrating the 
various cloth constructions for the purpose of determining the design of the weaves 
and the amount and kind of yarns used, and forms the basis of calculation in the 
cost of reproducing any style of goods. The various topics discussed are reeds and 
setts; relation and determination of counts of cotton, woolen, worsted, silk and 
yarns made from the great variety of vegetable fibers; grading of yarns, folded, ply, 
novelty and fancy yarns; application of the metric system to yarn calculation; 
problems involving take-up, average counts, determination of counts of yarn, and 
weight of yarn required to produce a given fabric. 

Two evenings per week. 

During the second year instruction is given in cotton warp goods, blankets, bath 
robes, filling reversible, extra warp and filling backs, figured effects produced by 
extra warp and filling, double cloths and plaid backs. 

The analysis work follows as closely as possible the type of fabrics taken up in 
the designing and the reconstruction of these fabrics with the consideration of 
their shrinkage and composition. 

Two evenings per week . 

In the third year instruction is given in multiple fabrics, chinchilla, Bedford cords, 
crepon, matelasse and imitations, double plains, meltons, kersey, plush and suitings. 
At this time also is taken up the construction of designers’ blankets, suggestion 
cards, and the construction of samples. 

The construction of new fabrics from theoretical viewpoint together with the 
construction from suggestion cards is taken up. In connection with this work in- 
struction if given in making cost estimates for both woolen and worsted fabrics. 

Two evenings per week. 

314. Cotton Weaving — 1 Year. 

The Course in Cotton Weaving covers instruction on plain looms, Draper Auto- 
matic and Stafford Automatic looms. It includes instruction on the construction 
of shedding and picking motions, take-up and let-off motions together with the 
operation of the magazines and hoppers and methods of changing shuttle and 
bobbin. A study is also made of the preparation of warps, beaming, sizing and 
drawing-in. The Crompton and Knowles Automatic Towel Looms, and the 
various types of box looms, including chain building and work on multipliers, are 
also considered in this course. 

One evening per week. 

315. Woolen and Worsted Weaving — 2 Years. 

This course includes instruction on the Crompton and Knowles loom and takes 
up general construction, head motions, take-up, let-off, filling stop motion, etc. 
The preparation of warps, wet and dry dressing, is given in connection with this 
course. 

One evening per week. 

316. Dobby and Jacquard Weaving — 1 Year. 

This course considers the various types of Jacquard heads and dobbies, which 
includes single cross border dobbies and leno attachments on double lift dobbies, 
handkerchief motions, leno weaving, center selvedge motions, filling changing 
looms, oscillating reeds, lappet motions, various shaker motions, towel and other 
pile cloth weaving. The course on Jacquard looms includes general construction, 
card cutting, lacing, repeating and fixing. 

One evening per week. 

317. Freehand Drawing — 3 Years. 

The first year work consists of charcoal drawing from casts, models, and group 
arrangements of still life. 

Two evenings per week. 


11 

During the second year instruction is given in color harmony — a study of true 
color and the variety of effects obtainable. 

Two evenings per week . 

In the third year the student chooses one of the following options: 

1. Design — Motifs suitable for fabric, wall paper, linoleum, etc. 

2. Costume Illustration — Drawing from the clothed figure. 

3. Oil Painting — A study of values and color using oil as a medium. 

Pen and ink, pastels, and water colors can be added when time' will permit. 

Two evenings per week. 

318. Show Card Design — 2 Years. 

During the first year the student is taught to master the drawing, with pencil, of 
a few very plain alphabets, both upper and lower case letters, also plain figures. 
With the characteristics of plain letter alphabets well in mind, it is but a few steps 
to make any of the more intricate ones. Following this he will make simple 
“lay-outs” of plain card signs, and then take up the lettering, with brush and paint, 
of some of his simple card designs. 

Two evenings per week . 

The second year is simply a continuation of the latter part of the first year work, 
with the addition of advanced design in the “lay-out” and color-scheme of practical 
show cards and posters, such as are designed and lettered in the up-to-date Show 
Card Shop of to-day. 

Two evenings per week . 

CHEMISTRY AND DYEING DEPARTMENT. 

Hardly any branch of applied science plays so important a part in our industrial 
world as chemistry. Many large mills employ chemists as well as dyers, and with 
the great progress which is being made in the manufacture and application of dye- 
stuffs, a basic knowledge of chemistry becomes an absolute necessity to the dyer. 
Within a comparatively short distance from Lowell are establishments employing 
men who require some knowledge of chemistry but who may not necessarily use 
dyes. Some find a knowledge of analytical chemistry helpful in their everyday 
work. 

To meet these varying needs of our industrial community, the school offers a 
two-year course in general chemistry, organic and inorganic, which may be followed 
by any one of three courses, viz., textile chemistry and dyeing, analytical chemistry, 
and textile and analytical chemistry. In order to take Course 412, 413 or 414, 
candidates must have a certificate from Course 411, or show by examination or 
approved credentials that they have taken the equivalent of the work covered by 
this course. 

411. Elementary Chemistry — 2 Years. 

General Chemistry, including Inorganic and Organic. 

Qualitative Analysis. 

One lecture and one Laboratory Period per week in General Chemistry the first 
year, continued three nights a week during the second year, when the Elementary 
Organic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis is completed. 

Instruction in Elementary Chemistry extends through two years, and includes 
lectures, recitations and a large amount of individual laboratory work upon the 
following subjects: — 

Theoretical Chemistry. — Chemical action, chemical combination, combining 
weights, atomic weights, chemical equations, acids, bases, salts, Avogadro’s law, 
molecular weights, formulae valence, periodic law, etc. 

Non-Metallic Elements. — Study of their occurrence, properties, preparation, 
chemical compounds, etc. 

Metallic Elements. — Study of their occurrence, properties, metallurgy, chem- 
ical compounds, etc. 

The students take up, as thoroughly as time will permit, the qualitative detection 
of the more common metals and non-metals, with practical work. 

This work, although necessarily elementary, is intended to prepare the student 
to study more understandingly the manufacture of dyestuffs and coal tar colors in 
the more advanced courses which follow. 


12 

During the first year of the Elementary Chemistry course most of the time is 
devoted to the non-metals and theoretical chemistry, and the laboratory work 
covers briefly the non-metals. 

Two evenings per week . 

During the second year the classroom work is upon metals and the hydrocarbons 
and their derivatives, and the laboratory work consists entirely of Qualitative 
Analysis. While this course is necessarily taken up in an abbreviated and ele- 
mentary manner, it is so arranged that the students may become familiar with the 
separations and the detections of the common metals and acids. This course is 
also preliminary to the work given in Analytical Chemistry. 

Three evenings per week . 

412. Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — 3 Years. 

Lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Laboratory Work in Dyeing. 

Covered by 60 lectures and two nights of laboratory work per week. 

The outline of the lecture course given in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing is as 
follows : — 

Technology of Vegetable Fibers. — Cotton, linen, jute, hemp, china grass. 
Chemical and physical properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, 
and their action with chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Animal Fibers. — Wool, mohair, silk. Chemical and physical 
properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, and their action with 
chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Artificial Fibers. — Study of the various forms of artificial 
silk, the process of manufacture, their properties and action with chemicals, acids 
and heat. 

Operations Preliminary to Dyeing. — Bleaching of cotton and linen; wool- 
scouring; bleaching, fulling and felting of wool; carbonizing; silk-scouring and 
bleaching, action of soap. 

The bleaching of cotton is studied with description of the various forms of kiers 
and machinery used; also the action of the chemicals used upon the material, 
and the various precautions that must be taken in order to insure successful work. 

Under this heading is included a study of the reagents used in the emulsive wool- 
scouring process, and their action upon the fiber under various conditions; also the 
most successful of the solvent methods of degreasing wool. 

Water and its Application in the Textile Industry. — Impurities present, 
methods for detection, their effect during the different operations of bleaching, 
scouring, dyeing and printing, and the methods used for their removal or correction. 

The important subject of boiler waters is also studied under this heading, with a 
full discussion of the formation of boiler scale, its disastrous results, and the methods 
by which it may be prevented. 

Mordants and Other Chemical Compounds used in Textile Coloring, 
and Classified as Dyestuffs. — Theory of mordants, their chemical properties 
and application, aluminum mordants, iron mordants, tin mordants, chromium 
mordants, organic mordants, tannin materials, soluble oil, fixing agents, leveling 
agents, assistants, and numerous other compounds not dyestuffs that are exten- 
sively used in the textile industry. 

Under this heading are included the definitions of various terms and classes of 
compounds used by textile colorists, such as color lakes, pigments, fixing agents, 
developing agents, mordanting principles and leveling agents. 

Natural Organic Coloring Matters. — Properties and application of indigo, 
logwood, catechu or cutch, Brazil wood, cochineal, fustic, tumeric, madder, quer- 
citron bark, Persian berries, and other natural dyestuffs that have been used in 
recent years by textile colorists. 

Mineral Coloring Matters. — Under this heading are discussed the proper- 
ties of such inorganic coloring matters and pigments as chrome yellow, orange and 
green, Prussian blue, manganese brown, iron buff. 


13 

Artificial Coloring Matters. — General discussion of their history, nature, 
source, methods of manufacture, methods of classification and their application 
to all fibers. 

Besides lectures and recitations upon the subject of Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing, practical laboratory work is required. By the performance of careful and 
systematic experiments the student learns the nature of the various dyestuffs and 
mordants, their coloring properties, their action under various circumstances, and 
the conditions under which they give the best results. The more representative 
dyestuffs of each class are applied to cotton, wool and silk, and each student is 
obliged to enter, in an especially arranged sample book, a specimen of each of his 
dye trials with full particulars as to the conditions of experiment, percentage of 
compounds used, time, temperature of dye baths, etc. 

For convenience and economy most of the dye trials are made upon small skeins 
or swatches of the required materials, but from time to time students are required 
to dye larger quantities in the full-sized dyeing machines. 

413. Analytical Chemistry — 3 Years. 

Laboratory Work and Lectures in Quantitative Analysis. 

Three nights per week of class-room and laboratory work. 

The object of this course is to give the student a general idea of the underlying 
principles of Analytical Chemistry, with a sufficient amount of laboratory work to 
enable him to become proficient in performing the ordinary routine analysis of the 
textile plant. Frequent recitations are held for the discussion of methods and the 
solution of stoichiometrical problems. 

The work covered the first two years is based on Talbot's “Quantitative Analy- 
sis," and for the advanced work, consists of the analysis of soap, water, oils, cloth 
and other materials of particular interest to the textile chemist, special lecture notes 
and Griffin's “Technical Methods of Analysis" is used as a text. 

414. Textile and Analytical Chemistry — 4 Years. 

Lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Laboratory Work in Analytical Chemistry. 

Combines all lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing with work of Course 413, 
but does not include any Dyeing Laboratory. 

Three evenings per week. 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

This department has arranged to offer those courses of study which lie at the 
foundation of all engineering. These are designed to give to those engaged in the 
mechanical, electrical, and manufacturing departments of mills, factories and other 
industrial establishments an opportunity to learn something concerning the theory 
underlying the many practical methods which they use in their daily work. Those 
subjects for which there is usually a regular demand are listed and described below, 
but similar and allied courses will also be arranged for provided there is a sufficient 
demand. In the case of all courses there must be an enrollment of at least ten 
properly qualified students to warrant giving the subject. 

613. Mechanical Drawing — 3 Years. 

For one having occasion to make a sketch or detail drawing for the purposes of 
illustration or instruction, or for one who is daily required to work from a drawing 
or blueprint, the course in Mechanical Drawing is offered. It first lays a founda- 
tion of the principles of mechanical drawing, and follows this with two years' work 
in drawing directly from parts of machines, preparing both the detail and the 
assembly drawing. 

This course is a complete course in drawing and requires two evenings per week 
for three years for its completion. The work is so planned that at its completion 
a man shall be thoroughly familiar with the making of a working or shop drawing. 
After a study of the underlying principles of projections and instruction in penciling, 
inking, lettering and tracing, the subject of sketching and the making of detail 
drawings therefrom is especially stressed. The preparation of assembly drawings 
is finally considered. 


14 

614. Machine Shop Practice — 2 Years. 

This course offers an opportunity to learn the art of metal working and is equally 
valuable to the man who already has some knowledge of the methods employed as 
to one who has no knowledge of the same. Thus it becomes possible for one who 
may be working at the bench during the day to learn how to operate a lathe or other 
machine tool, or for a lathe hand to acquire a knowledge of a planer, shaper, milling 
machine, or grinder. A series of lectures is given on the care and management of 
tools, tool grinding, and the mechanism of the machines. A man who only has a 
knowledge of the special machine he operates may by means of this course become 
a more intelligent machinist. He should supplement this study with the courses 
in Mechanical Drawing, and in Mechanics and Mechanism, in order that his train- 
ing for an all-round machinist or mechanic may be more complete. The time 
required is two evenings per week. 

619. Mechanics and Mechanism — 2 Years. 

This is one of the most important of engineering subjects dealing as it does with 
the principles which underlie the transmission of force and motion through ma- 
chines and mechanical devices. Its principles are so fundamental and so widely 
used in more advanced subjects that the student should not consider himself qualified 
for further work until he has mastered the principles of this subject. 

Beginning with a discussion of such important topics as work, power, horse- 
power, energy and the like, the student then studies the fundamental mechanical 
principles which are exemplified by the lever, jackscrew, pulley block, inclined 
plane, wedge, differential pulley and other similar devices. This is followed by 
consideration of the simpler relations pertaining to uniform and accelerated motion 
and the course concludes with a study of pulleys, belting, gears and gearing, as far as 
time permits. No student should undertake this course who is not thoroughly 
familiar with elementary mathematics. This subject requires attendance two 
evenings per week with home problem work and the study of a text book. 

620. Mathematics — 2 Years. 

This course is designed to permit the student to pursue further by evening study 
the mathematics of his grammar or junior high school course. It includes algebra, 
elementary trigonometry, logarithms and slide rule, and requires attendance for 
two evenings per week. It should be taken by all who intend to study further into 
engineering subjects. Instruction is largely through problem work in class and 
at home, and the use of a text book. 

Some of the topics treated are — 

Elementary algebraic operations of — 

Addition. 

Subtraction. 

Multiplication. 

Division. 

Factoring. 

Fractions. 

Graphical representation. 

621. Strength of Materials — 1 Year. 

This interesting subject deals with those important principles wherebj^ the person 
engaged in machine, engine, mill or building design may ascertain whether the parts 
are strong enough to carry the forces and loads which the nature of the construction 
imposes upon them. 

The fundamental stresses of tension, compression and shear are first considered, 
together with the ultimate strength of cast iron, wrought iron, steel, and timber. 
The practical use of this information is illustrated in the design of bolts, tie rods, 
columns, wall piers, boiler shells, riveted joints, etc. This is followed by a study 
of the stresses in and design of beams under various conditions of loading, and the 
course concludes with a discussion of the torsional stresses and twist in shafts. A 
knowledge of the principles of Mechanics and Mechanism is highly desirable to a 
satisfactory understanding of this subject. The time required is two evenings per 
week and the method of instruction is through lectures, recitations, problems, and 
the use of a text book. 


Linear equations. 
Radicals. 

Quadratic equations. 
Logarithms. 

Slide rule. 
Trigonometry. 




15 


622. Steam — 1 Year. 

It is the purpose of this course to study the various methods of heat generation, 
transmission, and utilization in use at the present day and to learn the theoretical 
relationship which underlie these processes and transformations. 

The instruction covers, so far as time permits, the elements of steam engineering. 
The topics covered are heat and its measurement, use of steam tables, types of 
boilers, engines and turbines, boiler and engine room accessories, together with a 
study of the methods of testing the various types of apparatus. Actual tests on 
such equipment are made as the size of the class permits. Text books, laboratory 
and class work, and home problems are the methods of instruction used, requiring 
an attendance of two evenings per week. 

623. Direct Current Electricity — 2 Years. 

This popular course is planned to cover the fundamentals of direct current 
circuits and machinery. The lectures on electrical theory are supplemented by 
laboratory work and the use of a text book and problems. It requires for its com- 
pletion attendance for two evenings per week and a considerable amount of home 
study and preparation. Students who wish to take this subject must have studied 
one year of algebra. 

The fundamental properties of electrical and magnetic circuits are studied both 
in the classroom and laboratory. Other topics include the measurement of resis- 
tance, the calculation and measurement of power in direct-current circuits, and the 
relation between the electrical, heat and mechanical units of energy. A large 
amount of laboratory and class work is given to make the student familiar with 
methods of operation, testing and control of direct current machinery. 

624. Alternating Current Electricity. — 2 Years. 

This course is similar to Course 623 except that it deals with alternating current 
circuits and machinery. No student should plan to take this course unless he has 
previously taken at least one year of Course 623 or can show that he has had the 
equivalent. 

The fundamental properties of alternating current circuits are first considered, 
and are followed by a study of the operation of alternating current machinery. 
The study of electrical measuring instruments is also included in this course. The 
instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, and a large amount of labora- 
tory work. An attendance of two evenings per week is required. 

625. Power Plant Machinery — 1 Year. 

The purpose of this course is to teach the operating engineer how to test the va- 
rious units usually found in a power plant. Numerical calculations are introduced 
and the interpretation of the results is of primary importance. 

The following are some of the machines tested: engine, turbine, triplex pump, 
centrifugal pump, injector, etc. Various gages are also calibrated. 

A test book is required and the class is held two evenings per week. 

626. Mill Illumination — 1 Year. 

Because of the demand by mill men, this course is now offered to evening 
students and requires an attendance of two evenings per week. 

Safety and production, factors entering into the design of lighting installations, 
industrial codes, costs and estimates are carefully considered. The laboratory 
exercises include the study of photometric curves of industrial units, study and use 
of the photometer, study of illumination by means of the Macbeth Illuminometer, 
and foot-candle meter. 

The concluding work will be the complete design of a lighting installation, using 
the Institute laboratories or a local mill room. 

Owing to limitations in apparatus, this course is open to a limited number of 
qualified men. 

627. Textile Marketing — 1 Year. 

An elementary course designed to acquaint the student with the principles of 
selling and merchandising of textiles. 

The selling agent, broker, converter, wholesaler, merchant, factor, and other 


16 

intermediaries in the channels of distribution are studied as well as the fundamentals 
of salesmanship, advertising, styling, market research, pricing, retailing, whole- 
saling, and forecasting. 

The material is presented by means of lectures and class discussions on assigned 
problems. An attendance of two evenings per week is required. 

Accounting Classes (Division of University Extension") 

Classes in Elementary, Advanced and Cost Accounting have been offered in 
past years at the Lowell Evening Textile School under the auspices of the Division 
of University Extension, State House, Boston, Mass. Their continuance is de- 
pendent upon a sufficient expression of interest in them. Outlines of the courses, 
fees, etc., may be obtained by inquiry at the above address or by addressing the 
school. 

FINISHING DEPARTMENT. 

In these courses machine work is supplemented by lectures and discussions per- 
taining to the many finishes given to fabrics. The action of soaps, water, steam, 
heat and cold upon cloth containing one fiber or combination of fibers as used in 
commercial fabrics is carefully studied. These courses also help the finisher to 
broaden his knowledge of textile fabrics. Attendance is required for two evenings 
per week. 

710. Woolen and Worsted Finishing — 1 Year. 

The outline of this course, which is given chiefly by means of lecture work, is as 
follows: 

Burling and Mending. — Under this head are taken up for consideration the 
examination of flannel as it comes from the loom; the construction, use and location 
of the perch; the methods used in marking defects, measuring, weighing and num- 
bering of cloths; also the methods of inspection for fancies, single cloths and double 
cloths. The object of burling, mending and the types of tables employed, the 
method of removing knots, runners, etc., the object of back shearing and the use 
of burling irons, the replacing of missing threads and the importance of sewing as 
a part of the finishing process, are also considered in detail. The removal of oil 
and tar spots as well as stains of various kinds is studied. 

Fulling. — This branch covers a study of the conditions of the flannel as it 
comes from the loom, and the influence of oil, etc., upon the procedure. Consider- 
able time is devoted to the various methods of producing a felt, the various types 
of stocks and their modifications and development into the present type of rotary 
fulling mills of both single and double variety. The details of construction in all 
machines are carefully taken up and include the design and composition of the 
main rolls, method of covering, regulation and means of adjusting the pressure of 
traps and rolls, and the use and regulation of the various types of stopmotion, the 
different types of stretchers, guide rolls and throat plates. 

The theory of felt is taken up and the influence of pressure, moisture, heat, alkali 
and acid is considered, as well as the hydroscopic and felting properties of different 
wool fibers. The preparation of the flannel for the mill and the usual methods of 
determining shrinkages, as well as the various methods of soaping, are given careful 
attention. The preparation of various fulling soaps and the value of each for the 
production of various degrees of felt, as well as the determination of the proper 
amount of alkali for various goods, are carefully studied and demonstrated. The 
manipulation of the various kinds of goods in the mill, viz., all wool, reworked 
wools and mixed goods, is studied in classroom and by operation in the laboratory. 

The change in weight and strength for each operation is carefully considered, as 
is also the value of the flocks made in each. A study of the various methods of 
flocking, such as dry and wet, is considered in both class and machine rooms. In 
each operation the defects likely to materialize are studied, as well as the cause 
thereof, and various methods of modifying or lessening them. 

Washing and Speck Dyeing. — This branch considers the scouring, rinsing and 
washing of goods both before and after the fulling process; the various types of 
washers; and the details of construction, such as suds box, rolls, etc. The theory 
of scouring, uses of Fuller’s earth, salt solutions and sours on the different kinds of 
goods are made clear by practical work in the machine room, where the effects due 


17 

to improper scouring, such as stains, cloudy effects, wrinkles and unclean goods, 
are demonstrated. The discussion of the necessity of speck dyeing follows natur- 
ally from the study of these matters, and includes methods of preparation, ma- 
terials used, application and tests required. 

Carbonizing. — This is an important branch of finishing, and includes a study 
of the various carbonizing agents, methods of application, strength of solutions and 
neutralizing, as well as the machines used. Stains and imperfections resulting 
from carbonizing are also considered. The drying and tentering machines and 
extractors employed are taken up at this point. 

Gigging, Napping and Steaming. — The construction in detail of the various 
types of gigs, nappers, steamers, wet gigs, rolling, stretching, crabbing and singeing 
machines is discussed, and their actions upon the cloth and the results obtained 
are explained. 

Various methods of obtaining luster and the production of permanent finish are 
considered in connection with steaming and sponging. 

Brushing, Shearing and Pressing. — This includes, as do the other branches, 
a careful treatment of the machine employed, the preparation of the cloth for each 
process, the action of each machine in producing its part of the resultant effect. 
In the manipulation of the shear consideration is given to its setting, grinding and 
adjustment. With the brushing machine the effect of steaming and moisture upon 
the luster and feel of the goods is shown. A study of the action of the presses, both 
plate and rotary, involves consideration of pressure, steaming, etc. Special pro- 
cesses to obtain particular effects are taken up, and the part played by each machine 
is explained. The details involved in handling cloth on a commercial scale, as, for 
example, measuring, weighing, ticketing, numbering and rolling, are also explained. 
The necessary calculation and the methods of finishing all grades of goods are con- 
sidered from time to time during the year. 

Two evenings per week. 

711. Cotton Finishing — 1 Year. 

The outline of the course in the finishing of cotton fabrics is as follows: — 

Cloth Room. — Instruction of the various goods and the objects thereof; con- 
struction of the various types of inspecting and trimming machines. 

Shearing. — The object. A consideration of the various types of shears for 
treating one or both sides at the same time; also the use of the usual cleaning de- 
vices, such as emery, sand and card rolls, beaters and brushes; grinding and the 
adjustment of the various parts. 

The use of brushing and cleaning machines, rolling devices and calender attach- 
ments for gray goods. 

Singeing. — Developing and object of singeing; the construction of singers of all 
types, and for various purposes; the use of cooling tanks, steaming devices, rolling 
and brushing attachments. 

Regulation of the flame for various goods, and adjustment of the parts; gas and 
air pressure, water-cooled rolls; the effect of moisture on the cost of singeing; the 
use of dry cans in connection with singeing; electric singeing. 

Washing. — Open width and string washers, their construction and operation; 
soaps, temperature, squeeze rolls; washing of various goods and the object thereof; 
stains. 

Napping. — The object of napping and the usual method of treating goods; 
various types of nappers, single and double acting; felting nappers; construction, 
grinding and adjustment of various types. 

Water Mangles. — Their object and construction of various types; various 
rolls, — iron, husk, etc., scutchers, their object and construction. 

Starch Mangles. — The object and construction of all types of starch mangles 
for pure starch and filled goods; various types of rolls, — brass, rubber, wood; action 
of doctor blades, etc.; regulation and object of pressure. 

Methods of starching and finishing all standard goods, also a consideration 
of the various substances used, such as starch, softener and fillers; the preparation 
of starch and various methods of application. 


18 

Dryers and Stretchers. — Both horizontal and vertical, tenter frames, clips; 
the swing motion and the finishes thus produced; construction; spraying machines, 
belt stretchers, button breakers; their object and construction. 

Calenders. — The object and construction of all types, including the regulation 
of pressure and nips for the production of various finishes; various types of rolls 
and their uses, — steel, husk and paper; the use of hot and cold rolls; chasing, fric- 
tion, embossing and Shriner calenders and the various finishes produced by each; 
production of watered effects; beetling machines. 

Making up room, — yarding, inspecting; different types of folds; pressing, paper- 
ing, marking. 

Two evenings per week. 

EVENING GRADUATES OF 1933. 

Certificates awarded as follows, April 4, 1933: 


Cotton Yarns — 3 Years. 


Lionel Theophile Pelletier ...... 

Lowell 

John Henry Shaw ....... 

Methuen 

Woolen Manufacturing — 4 Years 

Richard Waterhouse ....... 

Maynard 

Woolen Yarns — 2 Years. 

Clarence Richard Smith ...... 

Andover 

Stanley Edward Wojas ...... 

Lowell 

Worsted Yarns — 2 Years. 

Gordon Denby Ambler ...... 

Chelmsford 

Anthony Domenico Borrelli ...... 

Lawrence 

James Bernard Cousen ...... 

Lawrence 

Walter Dzioba ........ 

Lawrence 

Joseph Woodrow Kenyon ...... 

Lowell 

Harry Augustine Matthes, Jr. 

Lawrence 

Irvine Walter Merrill ....... 

Lawrence 

George Chadwick Richards, Jr. . 

Andover 

Herbert Hodgson Robinson ..... 

Methuen 

Cotton Design — 3 Years. 

Olen Franklin Marks ....... 

Lowell 

Edward William Tamulonis ..... 

Lowell 

Woolen and Worsted Design — 3 Years. 

Abbot Gaunt ........ 

Methuen 

Ralph Irving Littlefield ...... 

Lowell 

George Sumner Orr ....... 

Methuen 

Ernest Dobson Robinson ...... 

Methuen 

Show Card Design — 2 Years. 

Leo Fernand Cote ....... 

Lowell 

Joseph Henry Harne . . 

Lowell 

Maurice Ismael Lareau ...... 

Lowell 

Francis Ernest Matte ...... 

Lowell 

Stanley Joseph Michalik ...... 

Lowell 

Eugene Lawrence O’Connor ..... 

Lowell 

Japhet Eustache Prud’homme ..... 

Lowell 

Doris Lavinia Rigby ....... 

Lowell 


19 

Freehand Drawing — 3 Years 


Albert Joseph Beauregard . ..... Lowell 

Hildred Lenore Benway ...... Lowell 

Mary Bertha Desilets ...... Lowell 

Simonne Jeannette Drouin ...... Lowell 

Helena Joan Fish ....... Lowell 

Stella Magiera .... ... Lowell 

Gladys Gertrude Mooney ...... Lowell 

Mary Ann Morin ....... Lowell 

Jeannette Alma Pelletier ...... Lowell 

Mary Catherine Savage ...... Lowell 

Ivy Mae Smith Lawrence 

Kazimierz John Stys ....... Lowell 

Mary Elizabeth Sullivan ...... Lowell 

Nancy Agnes Turnbull ...... Lowell 

Lorraine Estelle Vigeant ...... Lowell 

Adam Carol Zabierek ...... Chelmsford 

Cotton Weaving — 1 Year. 

Samuel Baguley ....... Lowell 

Joseph Frederic Burtt ...... Lowell 

John Ainsleigh Gallagher ...... Lowell 

Marguerite Therese Richards ..... Lowell 

Stanley Edward Wojas . . . . . . Lowell 


Dobby and Jacquard Weaving — 1 Year. 


Joseph Frederic Burtt ...... Lowell 

John Ainsleigh Gallagher ...... Lowell 

John Jana ........ Lowell 

Olen Franklin Marks ....... Lowell 

Francis Adrien Soulard ...... Lowell 

Joseph Anthony Stewart ...... Lowell 

Percy Lorenzo Willis ....... Lowell 


Woolen and Worsted Weaving — 2 Years. 


Chester Arthur Brown ...... Lowell 

Alfred Omer Chouinard ...... Lowell 

John Ainsleigh Gallagher ...... Lowell 

Otto Karl Hemmerling ...... Lawrence 

Harold Addison Robey ...... Lowell 


Woolen and Worsted Finishing- 

George Frederick Cohen 
Edward Elphege Gagne 
George Frederick Hemas 
Burton Herman Locke 
Harold Norman Logan 
William Herbert Midgley 
Otto Frank Minzner . 

Joseph Chanel Ricard 
Eugene Paul Schremp 
Claude Alfred Taylor . 


1 Year. 

Lawrence 
Lawrence 
Lawrence 
Chelmsford 
Lowell 
Andover 
Methuen 
Lawrence 
Law r rence 
Methuen 


Elementary Chemistry — 2 Years 


Pauline Allen ........ Lawrence 

Benjamin Ambler Chelmsford 

Lionel Arsene Boisvert ... Lawrence 

Guido Joseph Cianci ....... Lawrence 

Raymond Conrad Desmarais .... Haverhill 


20 


Edgar Fortin .... 


Lawrence 

Edward Louis Gaudreau 


Lawrence 

Albert Francis Haley . . 


Haverhill 

Elbert Arthur Haley ... 


Tyngsborc 

Harry Fraser Holmes . 


Ipswich 

Edward George Maguire 


Bradford 

Herbert Neild .... 


Lowell 

Herv6 Armand Paquin 


Lowell 

Edward James Quigley 


Lowell 

Thomas Wilkinson Shoesmith 


Lawrence 

Myra Spencer Stone . 


Lawrence 

Brendon Vincent Tully 


Lowell 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — 3 Years. 

Walter Samuel Bean, Jr. 


Lowell 

Richard Warwick Bower 


Methuen 

William Edward Coulton 


Lawrence 

Arthur Francis Kittredge, Jr. 


Melrose 

John James Murphy .... 


Medford 

Raymond James Schuster . 


Lawrence 

Analytical Chemistry — 3 Years. 


Arthur William Lemkin 


Lowell 

James Angus McGillivray . 


Lowell 


Textile and Analytical Chemistry — 4 Years. 

Sumner Edmunde Shepard ...... Methuen 


Mathematics — 2 Years. 

Leslie Nelmes Athorn ..... 

Joseph Gideon Chouinard ..... 

James Stuart Clarke, Jr. .... 

Helen Julia Daly . . . 

John Lahiff Dolan ...... 

Thomas Joseph Fitzsimmons .... 

Joseph Benedict Gallagher . . . . - 

Philip Joseph Garrigan, Jr. . 

Paul Joseph Heron ...... 

Thomas Pasquill Houldsworth .... 

John Joseph Kenney ...... 

LTriel William Lemkin ..... 

Arthur Long ....... 

John Erwin Martin ...... 

Dolor Nelson Joseph Morel .... 

Ella Josephine Mulligan .... 

Alfred Robinson ...... 

Leo James Sheehan ...... 

William Francis Smith ..... 

Lincoln Scott Staveley ..... 

Fred Symons ....... 

Walter Henry Wood . . . . ... 


Forge Village 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Dracut 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Lowell 


Direct Current Electricity — 2 Years. 

Joseph Leo Champagne 
Edward John Dunn 
Charles Adolph Ermer 
Carl Benjamin Laidlaw 
Arne John Mikkola 
Ralph Bailey Newton 


Lowell 

Lowell 

North Salem, N.H. 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Guy Michael Palermo 
Errol Hawthorne Silk 
Joseph Lawrence Wade 


21 


Salem, N. H. 

Lowell 

Lawrence 


Alternating Current Electricity — 2 Years. 


Ejner Guthil Blomquist 
John Milton Cole 
Gerald William Gross 
Clifford Hartley 
Henry Homer Martell 
Alberto Max Ransden 


Andover 

Methuen 

Tewksbury 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Tewksbury 


Mechanical Drawing — 3 Years 

Lincoln Scott Staveley ...... Lowell 

Ralph Emmons Tweed ...... Lowell 


Machine Shop Practice — 2 Years. 
Armand Louis Gagnon ...... 

Leo Anthony Gaudet ....... 

Merle George James ....... 


Lowell 
Andover 
North Billerica 


Textile Marketing — 1 Year 
Joseph Allen, Jr. ...... 

Raymond William Berry ... 

John Kenrick Butler . 

Joseph John Devine ...... 

Reginald Edward McEachern ... 

Allan Daniel McQuarrie ... 

Joseph Patrick Moynihan .... 

John Patrick Murphy 

Thomas Rennie Palmer ..... 

Leo Donat Vigneault ...... 


Law 7 rence 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Lowell 


Power Plant Machinery — 1 Year. 
Daniel Francis Callahan, Jr. ..... 

Hugh Longstaff Christison ..... 

Florand Joseph Gauthier .... 

Desmond Alexander McElholm .... 

Edward Joseph Stepinski ...... 

Jack Thornton ...... 


Lowell 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Graniteville 

Lowell 







. 







SERIES 37, No. 2 


November , 7.95.5 


BULLETIN 

OF THE 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1933-1934 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized on October 21, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


PUBLICATION OF THIS DOCUMENT APPROVED BY THE COMMISSION ON ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

2200. 12-’33. Order 9912. 


2 


THE EFFECT OF REMOVAL OF NOIL ON YARN CHARACTERISTICS 


The data, on which this bulletin is based, were taken from a study carried on in 
the Department of Cotton Yarns by Mr. W. Edwin Stevens, a senior student. 
The subject was selected at the suggestion of an alumnus, who is interested in 
producing the best yarn possible without increasing the cost out of proportion 
to the increase in quality. 

The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of yarns spun 
from the same raw stock, when different percentages of noil were removed in 
combing. 

The cotton used was of Good Middling grade having a staple of 1 3/ 16 inches. 
The entire quantity was treated as one lot until it reached the sliver lapper. A 
portion was then set aside to make carded yarns. At the comb, the remaining 
cotton was divided into five lots. From drawing on, each lot was treated the 
same, all the lots being run at the same time on each machine and marked with 
different chalk to distinguish one lot from another lot. Carding and the following 
operations were carried on in a room automatically controlled at 53% relative 
humidity. 

The organization used is tabulated below: 


Card 

Sliver Lapper 
Ribbon Lapper 
Comb 
Drawing . 
Slubber 
Intermediate 
Fine . 

Spinning . 


50 grs. 
650 “ 
650 “ 
60 “ 
60 “ 
.65 Hk. 
1.80 Hk. 
5.50 “ 
28.00’s 


At the comb each lot had a different percentage of noil removed as follows: 

Lot 123456 

Noil (Carded) 13.7 15.8 18.0 20.4 24.7 

The yarns spun from the six lots of cotton were conditioned in a standard atmos- 
phere and tested for size and skein strength. Samples from each lot were wound 
on black boards and photographs were taken of representative samples. A plot 
was made showing the relation between the average strength for each lot and the 
percentage of noil removed. 


A summary of the data obtained is added here. 


Lot 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

Per cent noil 

0 

13.7 

15.8 

18.0 

20.4 

24.7 

( ^ x 68.25 

\100— % noil/ 

— 

75.0 

81.1 

83.3 

84.9 

90.5 

Counts (Spun) 

28.8 

29.4 

28.4 

28.1 

26.7 

28.2 

Strength 

63.2 

68.3 

71.3 

72.3 

75.3 

73.8 

Constant 

1820 

2010 

2015 

2030 

2035 

2075 

.Strengths (28’s) 

65.0 

71.8 

72.0 

72.5 

72.7 

74.1 


The accompanying plot shows the strength figures converted to the equivalent 
strength for a 28’s yarn plotted against the percentage of noil removed. Note 
that there is a gradual increase in strength as more noil is removed. 

The dotted line in this plot represents the inverse of (100 — percentage of noil) 
multiplied by a constant (68.25) to make the value plot on about the same scale 
as the strength figures. This dotted line serves to give an approximate idea of the 


increased value of the cotton in the combed sliver due to the removal of waste. 
It serves to indicate that the cost of the cotton in the sliver increases at fully as 
rapid a rate as the rate of increase in strength. 



The photographs give an idea of the improvement in the appearance of the 
yarns due to the removal of larger percentages of noil. Notice that there is a 
gradual improvement in the yarns up to 20% noil but that photographs 5 and G 
show very little difference. 








Southwick Hall 



SERIES 37. NO. 3. 


February, 1934 


BULLETIN 

of the 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1934 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917, authorized October 21, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 


6M. 2-’34. Order 645. 


CALENDAR 

1933-1934 

September 14-15, Thursday-Friday . . . Entrance Examinations 

September 18-23, Monday-Saturday . . . Re-examinations 

September 21, Thursday, 9.00 a.m Registration for Freshmen 

September 25, Monday Registration for upper-class students 

Classes begin for Freshmen 

September 26, Tuesday Classes begin for upper-class students 

October 12, Thursday Columbus Day — Holiday 

November 28, Tuesday, 4.45 p.m Thanksgiving recess begins 

December 4, Monday, 9.00 a.m Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 22, Friday, 4.45 p.m Christmas recess begins 

January 3, Wednesday, 9.00 a.m Christmas recess ends 

January 15, Monday First term examinations begin 

January 26, Friday End of first term 


January 29, Monday . . . 
February 22, Thursday . . 
March 23, Friday, 4.45 p.m. 
April 2, Monday, 9.00 a.m. 
April 19, Thursday . . . 
May 21, Monday .... 
May 30, Wednesday . . . 

June 5, Tuesday 

June 7-8, Thursday-Friday 


Second term begins 
Washington’s Birthday — Holiday 
Spring recess begins 
Spring recess ends 
Patriots’ Day — Holiday 
Second-term examinations begin 
Memorial Day — Holiday 
Commencement 
Entrance Examinations 


1934-1935 

September 13-14, Thursday-Friday . . . Entrance Examinations 

September 17-22, Monday-Saturday . . . Re-examinations 

September 20, Thursday, 9.00 a.m Registration for Freshmen 

September 24, Monday Registration for upper-class students 

Classes begin for Freshmen 

September 25, Tuesday Classes begin for upper-class students 

October 12, Friday Columbus Day — Holiday 

November 12, Monday Holiday — Observance of Armistice 

Day 

November 27, Tuesday, 4.45 p.m Thanksgiving recess begins 

December 3, Monday, 9.00 a.m Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 21, Friday, 4.45 p.m Christmas recess begins 

January 2, Wednesday, 9.00 a.m Christmas recess ends 

January 14, Monday First term examinations begin 

January 25, Friday End of first term 


January 28, Monday . . . 
February 22, Friday . . . 
April 12, Friday, 4.45 p.m. 
April 22, Monday, 9.00 a.m. 
May 20, Monday .... 
May 30, Thursday .... 

June 4, Tuesday 

June 6-7, Thursday-Friday 


Second term begins 

Washington’s Birthday — Holiday 

Spring recess begins 

Spring recess ends 

Second term examinations begin 

Memorial Day — Holiday 

Commencement 

Entrance Examinations 


3 

TRUSTEES OF THE LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

Officers 

ROYAL P. WHITE, Chairman 

FREDERICK A. FLATHER, Vice-Chairman CHARLES H. EAMES, Clerk 

Trustees 

On the Part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Dr. Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 

On the Part of the City of Lowell 
Hon. James J. Bruin, Mayor of Lowell 

For Term ending June 30, 1934 

Thomas T. Clark, North Billerica, Treasurer, Talbot Mills, class of 1910 
Joseph A. Gagnon, Lowell, President of the Gagnon Company 
George M. Harrigan, Lpwell, President, Lowell Trust Company 
Stanley H. Wheelock, Uxbridge, President and Treasurer, Stanley Woolen 
Company, class of 1905 

Vincent M. McCartin, Lowell, Superintendent of Public Schools 
For Term ending June 30, 1935 

Frederick A. Flather, Lowell, Treasurer, Boott Mills, Boston corporation, 
mills at Lowell 

Henry A. 1 Bod well, Andover, Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, Boston, class 
of 1900 

Edward M. Abbot, Westford, Vice-President, Abbot Worsted Company, Granite- 
ville, class of 1904 

Mrs. H. L. Boutwell, 209 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Irving Southworth, Andover, Agent, Pacific Mills, Boston corporation, mills at 
Lawrence 


For Term ending June 30, 1936 
Royal P. White, Lowell, Agent, Stirling Mills, class of 1904 
Edward B. Wentworth, 165 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Philip S. Marden, Lowell, Editor-in-chief, Courier-Citizen 
Charles W. Churchill, Lowell, Manager, Churchill Manufacturing Company, 
Inc., class of 1906 

Tracy A. Adams, North Adams, Vice-President and General Manager, Arnold 
Print Works, class of 1911 


Royal P. White 
Frederick A. Flather 

Frederick A. Flather 

Stanley H. Wheelock 
Tracy A. Adams 

Charles W. Churchill 

Frederick A. Flather 

Edward M. Abbot 

Joseph A. Gagnon 


General Committees 

Finance Committee 
Henry A. Bodwell 

Cotton and Knitting 
Irving Southworth 

Woolen and Worsted 
Thomas T. Clark 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Designing and Finishing 
Edward B. Wentworth 

Engineering 
Henry A. Bodwell 

Athletics 

Charles W. Churchill 

Evening School 
Vincent M. McCartin 


Thomas T. Clark 
Edward B. Wentworth 

Charles W. Churchill 

Edward M. Abbot 

Stanley H. Wheelock 

Mrs. H. C. Boutwell 

Thomas T. Clark 

Philip S. Marden 
James J. Bruin 


4 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Charles Holmes Eames, S.B Billerica 

President 

Louis Atwell Olney, S.B., M.S., Sc.D 118 Riverside Street 

Professor of Chemistry; in charge of Department of Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring 

Edgar Harrison Barker 9 Mount Hope Street 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Wool Yarns 

Arthur Andrew Stewart 124 Luce Street 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Finishing 

Hermann Henry Bachmann 146 Parkview Avenue 

Professor of Textile Design; in charge of Department of Design and Weaving 

Lester Howard Cushing, A.B., EdM 10 Walden Street 

Professor of History and Economics; in charge of Department of Languages, 
History and Economics; Secretary of the Faculty; Director of Athletics 
and Physical Education 

Herbert James Ball, S.B., B.C.S 119 Wentworth Avenue 

Professor of Textile Engineering; in charge of Department of Textile Engi- 
neering and Accountancy 

Gilbert Roscoe Merrill, B.T.E 364 Varnum Avenue 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Cotton Yarns and Knitting 

Stewart Mackay North Chelmsford 

Assistant Professor of Textile Design 

John Charles Lowe 161 Dracut Street 

Assistant Professor of Textiles 

Martin John Hoellrich 30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence 

Assistant Professor of Weaving 

Elmer Edward Fickett, B.S 162 Hovey Street 

Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry 

Frederick Steere Beattie, Ph.B 285 Foster Street 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

Harold Canning Chapin, Ph.D 290 Pine Street 

Assistant Professor of General Chemistry 

Charles Lincoln Howarth, B.T.C North Billerica 

Assistant Professor of Dyeing 

Percy Charles Judd, B.S 156 Methuen Street 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Harry Chamberlain Brown, S.B 272 Merrimack Street 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

James Guthrie Dow, A.B 11 Robbins Street 

Assistant Professor of English 

Cornelius Leonard Glen R.F.D.No.l, Lowell 

Assistant Professor of Finishing 

A. Edwin Wells, B.T.E 204 Franklin Street, Melrose Highlands 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Russell Lee Brown, B.T.E 59 Bradstreet Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Textiles 

Charles Harrison Jack R. F. D. No. 1, Pelham, N. H. 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

Ruth Foote, A.B., S.B 46 Victoria Street 

Instructor and Registrar 

Albert Greaves Sugden 673 School Street 

Instructor in Weaving 

Arthur Joseph Woodbury 41 Morey Street 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Russell Metcalf Fox 359 Beacon Street 

Instructor in Textile Design 

Charles Arthur Everett, B.T.C Chelmsford 

Instructor in Dyeing 

James Harrington Kennedy, Jr 177 A Street 

Instructor in Wool Yams and Sorting 


5 


William George Chace, Ph.B 7 Sanborn Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

John Leslie Merrill, B.T.E 2026 Middlesex Street 

Instructor in Weaving 

John Henry Skinkle, S.B 7 Sanborn Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Franz Evron Baker, B.T.E. . . . . . . Dalton Road, Chelmsford 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Charles Frederick Edlund, B.S 272 Merrimack Street- 

Instructor in Sales Engineering 

Milton Hindle, B.T.E 24 Highland Avenue, Melrose Highlands 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

Horton Brown, B.S 17S Atlantic Avenue, Marblehead 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Elmer Percy Trevors 18 Rhodora Street 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Paul David Petterson East Chelmsford 

Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

George Forsythe 199 North Main Street, Andover 

Assistant Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Raymond Lewis Matthews 298 Pawtucket Street 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Simon Shapiro 84 Cambridge Street 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

Kenneth Everett Leslie 9 Nineteenth Avenue, Haverhill 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Walter Ballard Holt 37 Albert Street 

Bursar 

Florence Moore Lancey 46 Victoria Street 

Librarian 

Helen Gray Flack, S.B 445 Stevens Street 

Secretary 

Mona Blanche Palmer 685 Westford Street 

Clerk 

Miriam Kaplan Hoffman, S.B 43 Hawthorn Street 

Clerk 


HISTORICAL SKETCH 
of the 

LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

By virtue of legislative acts of 1928, the Lowell Textile School became known as 
the Lowell Textile Institute in order to define more clearly the standing of the 
institution. This was the natural result of the development of the original ideas 
and policies of the trustees who founded the Lowell Textile School. The articles 
of incorporation were authorized by Chapter 475, Acts of 1895, and provided for 
a corporation to be known as the Trustees of the Lowell Textile School of Lowell, 
Massachusetts. The movement for the establishment of the school dates from 
Tune 1 1891 but it was not opened for instruction until February 1, lo9< • 

In accordance with the acts of incorporation the Board of Trustees consist^ of 
twenty permanent and self-perpetuating members, three-fourths of whom must 
be “actively engaged in, or connected with, textile or kindred manufactures. In 
addition, his Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Commission of Education of 
the State, the mayor, the president of the municipal council, the superintendent 
of schools of Lowell, and a representative of the textile council were members ex- 
officio. Legislative acts of 1905 and 1906 authorized the graduates of the school to 
elect four trustees serving for periods of four years each. , 

By virtue of the anti-aid amendment to the State Constitution, and by Chapter 
274 General Acts of 1918, the property of the school was transferred on July 1, 
1918, to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the control and managemen 
of the school was vested in a Board of Trustees appointed by the Governor, with 
all the powers, rights and privileges and subject to all the duties of the origina 

B Yn d locating the Institute at Lowell, which has been called the “Mother Textile 
City of America,” considerable advantage is secured by close association with 
every branch of the industry, which utilizes almost every commercial fiber in th 
products of the great Merrimack Valley textile district. 

Although the school was formally opened by Governor Roger Wolcott on Jan- 
uary 30, 1897, in rented quarters in the heart of the city, it was not until January, 
1903, that the first buildings of the present plant were ready for occupancy. On 
February 12, 1903, Governor John L. Bates dedicated the present buildings. 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE INSTITUTE 

The object of the establishment of the Institute as set forth in the original act 
was “for the purpose of instruction in the theory and practical art of textile and 

kindred branches of industry • i Mo™ 

The plan was occasioned by the apparent crisis in the leading industry of New 
England, due to the rapid development of the manufacture of the coarser cotton 
fabrics m the southern States. It was believed that this crisis could be met only 
by a wider and more thorough application of the sciences and arts in the p 

duction of finer and more varied fabrics. , , , .. , . , „ 

Following the general methods and systems found successful at the higher poly 
technic institutes, it offers thorough instruction in the principles of the sciences and 
arts applicable to textile and kindred branches of industry. The courses treat 
not onto of the theory but also the application of these principles in the processes, 
on the machines and throughout all departments of industry involved in the 
successful manufacture, application and distribution of textile material m any 

^Though from the first the management has kept in view the clearly defined 
objective which called for the establishment of the Institute, if .has deve oped its 
curriculum, its methods of instruction, and equipment as the needs of J^e mdus y 
arose. This objective will be kept constantly in view, and as new deman. ds are 
presented an effort will be made to extend courses, equipment and floor space 
The mechanical equipment of the Institute includes the best makes of textile 
machinery” ^machines, while built as they would be for regular work 
are, as ilr as possible, adapted to the experimental work which is of particular 

^Becauseof the' breadth, grade and character of instruction given, and because 


7 

of the standing and personnel of the instructing staff, the Institute has been placed 
by both Federal and State educational boards in the class of the higher technological 
schools of this country. 

The United States Civil Service Commission recognizes graduates from the 
degree courses of this school as proper applicants for the examination to the various 
positions requiring a knowledge of applied science and engineering, as well as a 
knowledge of textile manufacturing, in the different departments of the govern- 
ment. 

The day classes have been organized for those who can devote their entire time 
for three or more years to the instruction requisite in preparing to enter the textile 
industries. It has been found necessary to require of all such students educational 
qualifications equivalent to those given by a regular four-year course of a high 
school or academy of good standing. 

The evening classes are held for about twenty weeks of the year, and are for 
those who are unable to attend the day courses. These are similar to the day 
courses, but are aimed especially to meet the needs of students working during 
the day in the mills and shops. For entrance to these classes an applicant should 
have the equivalent of a grammar school education. A detailed description of 
these courses and requirements is given in another Bulletin, which will be sent 
upon request. 


BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The site is a commanding one, consisting of about 15 acres at a high elevation 
on the west bank of the Merrimack River. It extends to and overlooks the rapids 
of Pawtucket Falls, which was the first water power in America to be used on an 
extensive scale to operate power looms. It was contributed by Frederick Fanning 
Ayer, Esq., of New York City, and the Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on the 
Merrimack River. 

Southwick Hall, the main building, fronting on Moody Street, was contributed 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Frederick Fanning Ayer, Esq., and 
is a memorial to Royal Southwick, a leading textile manufacturer, a public man 
of earlier days, and a maternal ancestor of Mr. Ayer. It includes a central mass 
90 by 90 feet, having three stories and two wings 80 by 85 feet each with two 
stories and well-lighted basements. The building is pierced in the center by an 
arched way from which access is had to the wings and to the central courtyard. 
The northern wing is occupied by the General Offices, Engineering and Finishing 
Departments, and Library, while the southern wing is occupied by the Chemistry 
and Dyeing Departments. 

Kitson Hall, dedicated to the memory of Richard Kitson, was contributed by 
Charlotte P. Kitson and Emma K. Stott, his daughters; the Kitson Machine 
Company of Lowell, founded by Mr. Kitson, was also a generous contributor. 
This hall makes a right angle with Southwick Hall, is 70 by 183 feet, has two stories 
and a basement and houses the Cotton Yarn and Knitting Departments, the 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering laboratories and the Machine Shop. 

The Falmouth Street Building forms the third side of the quadrangle, and con- 
sists of three portions, one 60 by 75 feet, three stories, one 75 by 130 feet, three 
stories, and the head house 70 by 80 feet, three stories and basement. The build- 
ing is occupied by the picker section of the Cotton Yarn Department, the Design 
and Power Weaving Department and by the Woolen and Worsted Yarn Depart- 
ment, and contains on the lower floors an equipment for the manufacture of wool 
yarn from the fleece to the finished yarn. The upper floors are occupied by a great 
variety of plain, dobby and Jacquard looms, and in a section of the building are 
the students’ lockers and recreation rooms. 

Colonial Avenue Building was erected in the summer of 1910 from plans pre- 
pared by the Engineering Department, which also had in charge the work of 
construction. The building completes the fourth side of the quadrangle, and in 
outward appearance corresponds to the architectural features of the other school 
buildings. It is a single-story building, and has the dimensions of 195 by 60 feet. 
Its interior is faced with cement brick made at the school during the progress of the 
work. These serve to give light-reflecting walls which are advantageous for the 
work of the Wool Manufacturing, Cotton Finishing and Chemistry and Dyeing 


8 

Departments that occupy this building. The funds for this building were provided 
by the State of Massachusetts. 

The buildings are of modern mill construction adapted to educational uses and 
contain approximately 180,563 square feet. 

CAMPUS 

Through the generosity of Mr. Frederick Fanning Ayer the Institute has been 
provided with a campus and athletic field of about 3 acres. This has been care- 
fully graded and laid out for baseball, football and track athletics. 

To enclose this field the Alumni Class Fence has been partly built. It is made 
of forged iron sections supported between brick columns. Each section is con- 
tributed by a class, so that in the course of a few years this fence will entirely 
enclose the field. 

On the upper floor of the Falmouth Street Building there has been provided a 
recreation room for the use of the students at such times as their attendance is 
not required in classes. 

In the basement of this building there are rooms for the use of the athletic 
teams. Connected to these are showers and dressing rooms. 

The upper hall of Southwick Hall has been equipped with gymnastic apparatus. 
Chest weights, wooden dumb-bells, Indian clubs, a set of traveling rings, a vaulting 
horse, parallel bars, a punching bag and several sets of foils and single sticks have 
been provided. 

In order to be sure that no student having any dangerous physical weakness 
takes part in any athletic contest, all candidates for the various athletic teams 
are obliged to pass a satisfactory physical examination. 


9 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Particular stress should be laid upon a thorough grounding in mathematics, 
including algebra, arithmetic and plane geometry, as these form the basis upon 
which the work of this school rests. While solid geometry is not required at the 
present time, the student will find a knowledge of this subject very valuable in his 
subsequent work, and is strongly recommended to include this subject as one of 
his electives. A preliminary course in science, including physics and chemistry, 
serves to prepare the student's mind for the higher branches of these subjects and 
their application, but neither will be considered as the equivalent of the courses in 
these branches given in the Institute. 

Degree Courses 

Candidates for admission to either of the degree courses must be graduates of 
a school approved by the New England College Entrance Certificate Board or 
by the board of Regents of New York, and must present a certificate from the 
principal of the school last attended, reporting upon the subjects pursued and 
the points obtained according to the schedule of studies given hereafter. A total 
of fifteen points is required. 

A point represents satisfactory work in a year's study in a specified subject in 


an approved secondary school. 

Required Subjects 

Algebra A1 1 

Algebra A2 1 

English 4 

Language other than English 2 

Plane Geometry 1 

History (American, Medieval and Modern, or English) 1 

Physics 1 

11 

Elective Subjects Points 

Chemistry 1 

Elementary French (two years) orl 2 

Elementary German (two years) / 

Advanced French or German (one year in addition to requirements of Ele- 
mentary French A or Elementary German A) 1 

History: 

American 1 

Medieval and Modern 1 

English 1 

Latin 1 

Mechanical Drawing 1 

Mechanic Arts 1 

Solid Geometry 1 

Spanish 1 

Trigonometry 1 


An applicant may also be admitted on the basis of entrance examinations, in 
which case he must pass a sufficient number of the required subjects to make 
ten points and present certificates showing satisfactory courses in such of the 
elective subjects to make three additional points. 

The objective of the elective requirements is to encourage greater breadth of 
preparation than that covered by the required branches. Certificates covering 
other subjects than those listed as elective will be entertained. 

Diploma Courses 

Candidates for admission to the diploma courses are accepted upon presentation 
of properly vouched certificates showing the completion of a regular four-year 
course in a high school or academy of reputable standing. The certificate must 
specify that the applicant has satisfactorily passed the required subjects. 

A total of twelve points is required. 


10 

Required Subjects Points 

Algebra A1 1 

Algebra A2 1 

English 4 

Plane Geometry 1 

History (American, Medieval and Modern, or English) 1 

Physics 1 


Elective Subjects 

Three may be selected from the list under Degree Courses. 


ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

All students who are unable to present a certificate for either the degree or the 
diploma courses must pass entrance examinations. Notification of intention to 
take these examinations must be made in writing at least a week before the date 
of the examinations. These will be held as follows: — 

Thursday, June 7, 1934; Thursday, September 13, 1934; Thursday, June 6, 1935: — 
Algebra, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

History, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

English, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Friday, June 8, 1934; Friday, September 14, 1934; Friday, June 7, 1935: — 

Plane Geometry, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

German or French, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Physics, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Candidates failing to pass the June examinations are allowed to try again in 
September; those who cannot attend the June examinations may present them- 
selves in September. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS FOR ENTRANCE 

Algebra Al. — Derivation and use of simple formulas, graphical representation, 
the meaning and use of negative numbers, linear equations, with one or two un- 
known quantities, ratio and proportion, the essentials of algebraic technique, 
simple cases of exponents and radicals. 

Algebra A2. — Numerical and literal quadratic equations in one unknown 
quantity, the binomial theorem for positive integral exponents, arithmetic and 
geometric series, simultaneous linear equations in three unknown quantities, 
simultaneous equations consisting of one quadratic and including graphical solu- 
tions, exponents and radicals. 

Plane Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good textbooks, 
including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures, the circle and the 
measurement of angles, similar polygons, areas, regular polygons, and the measure- 
' ment of the circle. The solution of original problems and problems in mensuration 
of lines and plane surfaces. 

English. — As secondary schools are following to a greater extent than here- 
tofore the requirements of the College Entrance Examination Board, it is recom- 
mended that the applicant to this school conform to the suggestions of this Board 
relative to English composition and literature. 

The examination consists of two parts, both of which are given at the same 
time. 

(a) With the object of testing the student’s ability to express his thoughts 
in writing clearly and correctly he will be required to write upon subjects familiar 
to him. Emphasis will be laid upon the composition, punctuation, grammar, 
idiom and formation of paragraphs. He will be judged by how well he writes 
rather than by how much he writes. 

( b ) The second part of the examination is prepared with the view of ascertaining 
the extent of the student’s knowledge of good literature, and to test this examina- 
tion questions will be based on the books adopted by the National Conference on 
Uniform Entrance Requirements. Any course of equivalent amount if made up 
of standard works will be accepted. 


11 

History, — Applicants may offer a preparation of American history, English 
history, or medieval and modern history. 

In American history applicants should be familiar with the early settlements 
in America, the colonies, their government, the customs of the people, and events 
which led to the establishment of the United States. They should be informed 
concerning the causes and effects of the principal wars in which the country has 
been involved. They should be prepared to consider also questions requiring an 
elementary knowledge of civil government, as well as historical facts connected 
with the growth of this country up to the present time. 

For the subject of English history or medieval and modern history the course 
given in any reputable secondary school should give proper preparation. A course 
extending over a full year with not less than three periods a week will be accepted. 

Physics. — The applicant should be familiar with the fundamental principles of 
physics, particularly those considered under the headings of mechanics, heat, light, 
electricity and magnetism. Textbook instruction should be supplemented by 
lecture table experiments. Wherever possible, the student should pursue a lab- 
oratory course, but for the present no applicant will be conditioned in this subject 
if he has not been able to carry on a laboratory course. Where a laboratory course 
is offered by a secondary school, it should cover at least twenty-five of those exper- 
iments listed in the syllabus of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Modern Languages. — Required for degree courses only. It is expected that 
the work in these subjects has covered a period of at least two years of preparatory 
school training or the equivalent. Importance should be given to the ability to 
translate into good idiomatic English, but attention should also be paid to gram- 
mar and construction, that greater care may be used in translation. 

Elementary German A. — The entrance examination is composed of two 
parts, both taken, however, at the same time. 

(a) Translation of simple German prose into good idiomatic English. 

(b) Questions to test proficiency in grammar, and simple English sentences to 
be rendered into German. 

The requirements include the declension of articles, adjectives, pronouns and 
nouns; the conjugation and inflection of weak and strong verbs; the simpler uses 
of the subjunctive; the use of the modal auxiliaries; the prepositions and their 
uses; the principal parts of important verbs; and the elementary rules of syntax 
and word order. 

Texts used in the language courses of any reputable high or preparatory school 
will furnish reading for translation. A list of texts is offered by the College En- 
trance Examination Board. 

Elementary French A. — The entrance examination is composed of two parts, 
both taken, however, at the same time. 

(а) Translation of simple French prose into good idiomatic English. 

(б) Questions to test proficiency in grammar, and simple English sentences 
to be rendered into French. 

The requirements include the principal parts, conjugation and inflection of the 
regular and the more common irregular verbs; the singular and plural forms of 
nouns and adjectives; the uses of articles and partitive construction; the forms 
and positions of personal pronouns; and the simpler uses of the conditional and 
subjunctive. 

Suitable texts are suggested by the language courses of any reputable high or 
preparatory school and by the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

Students who have pursued two years of elementary French as well as two 
years of elementary German may present one subject to cover two points in the 
required subjects, and the other to cover two points in the elective subjects. 

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

History. — If the applicant can present all three or any two branches of history 
specified he may include one as a required subject and the others in the list of 
elective subjects 

Chemistry. — Applicants must show evidence of their familiarity with the 
rudiments of chemistry. Any course given in a secondary school organized to 


12 

present instruction by means of textbook or lecture, together with correlated 
laboratory work, will be considered as covering the requirements. The applicant’s 
notebook with his original notes, including description of experiment, apparatus 
used, reactions, observations and deductions, must be accompanied by his in- 
structor’s certificate. 

Importance will be placed upon manipulation and deductions as well as the 
general appearance and neatness of the notebook. 

Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good textbooks, 
including the relations of planes and lines in space, the properties and measure- 
ment of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones; the sphere and spherical triangles. 
The solution of original problems and the applications of the mensuration of 
surfaces and solids. 

Trigonometry. — The usual courses of instruction covered by the standard 
textbooks on plane and spherical trigonometry will prepare an applicant suf- 
ficiently to meet this requirement. 

Mechanical Drawing. — The applicant must have pursued such a course in 
mechanical drawing that he will be familiar with the usual geometrical construction 
problems, projection of points, lines, planes and simple solids. 

Importance is laid not only upon the accuracy with which the work is per- 
formed, but upon the general arrangement, appearance and care with which 
the plates are executed. 

It should not be understood that work in this subject may be offered as the 
equivalent of the first term’s work at the Institute. 

Mechanics Arts. — The usual courses offered by properly equipped preparatory 
schools will be accepted as suitable fu lfilm ent of this requirement. Work should 
include instruction in the handling of both wood and metal working tools in the 
more simple practices of these arts. 

Elementary French B. — Applicants who enter for one of the three-year 
courses may present one year’s work in French in a secondary school. Those 
who present themselves for examination in this subject should be familiar with 
the rudiments of grammar, and be able to translate simple French prose into 
good idiomatic English, also to translate into French English sentences, based on 
the French given for translation. 

Elementary German B. — Applicants who enter for one of the three-year 
courses may present one year’s work in German in a secondary school. What is 
stated in regard to French applies to those who may present German instead of 
French. 

Advanced French or German. — In cases where applicants have pursued 
courses in French or German for more than two years, and have completed work 
which is more advanced than is included under elementary French or German 
they may offer the additional year as an elective. 

Spanish. — Students offering Spanish should be familiar with elementary 
grammar, the common irregular verbs, and be able to translate simple Spanish to 
English or English to Spanish. A preparation equivalent to three periods per 
week for two years will be acceptable. 

Latin. — Students who have pursued one or more years of Latin may pre- 
sent this subject as an elective. Each year’s work satisfactorily completed will 
be considered equal to one point. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates who may have received previous training in any of the subjects 
scheduled in the regular course will, upon presentation of acceptable certificates, 
be given credit for such work. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduates of technical courses of other schools are invited to communicate with 
the president with reference to special courses in the textile studies. Previous 
training in the sciences and the engineering branches will usually reduce materially 
the time necessary to complete any of the courses at the Institute. The advantages 
offered to such persons for special research work are unexcelled, and a most profit- 
able course may be arranged. 


13 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Degree Courses. — The four-year degree courses are as follows : 

Textile Engineering. 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring. 

At the completion of these courses the degrees of Bachelor of Textile Engineering 
(B.T.E.) and Bachelor of Textile Chemistry (B.T.C.) are conferred. 

Five options are offered in the Engineering Course, viz., general textile, cotton 
manufacturing, wool manufacturing, design, or sales option. Each of these courses 
is planned to train one in the fundamental principles of science found to be appli- 
cable in the particular fields of textile chemistry and textile engineering. It is 
maintained that for one to be succcessul in either of these important branches of 
industry a training is required as thorough and broad as that of any of the recog- 
nized branches of engineering or of applied science. 

With this in mind these courses have been built of a secure framework of science 
and mathematics, and to it has been added the useful application of these branches 
in the broad textile field. With the direct purpose of laying a secure foundation 
in the training, a more extended preparatory course is first demanded, and subse- 
quently in the school work more subjects of a general character are included, that 
narrowness of judgment and observation may not result by overstimulation of the 
technical development. 

Diploma Courses. — The following courses extend over a period of three years 
and upon the completion of any one of these the diploma of the Institute is awarded : 

Cotton Manufacture. 

Wool Manufacture. 

Textile Design. 

These are the original courses offered at the Institute, arranged to require three 
years’ study and to give the student as thorough a training as possible for his 
chosen field, stressing particularly the study of textiles. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Although all classes are open to women, the courses which have appealed es- 
pecially to their tastes have been textile designing and decorative art. Some have 
pursued courses in chemistry, and have added to their work in design some in- 
struction in power weaving and finishing. In general these special courses have 
been followed for three years and in some cases have led the students to positions 
either in the mill office or in some commercial lines that have been desirable and 
have offered congenial work. 

Within the last few years the possibilities for women in certain branches of 
textile chemistry have become recognized and it is believed that in the future 
the positions open to them will become more and more numerous. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application for Admission. — A blank form of application for admission may 
be found at the end of this bulletin. This should be properly filled out by all ap- 
plicants, whether entering upon certificate from a secondary school or presenting 
themselves for examination. 

Freshman Registration. — Each freshman is expected to be in daily attendance 
beginning Thursday, September 20, at 9.00 a.m., and to follow the prepared program 
which will be placed in his hands. A program which is planned to acquaint the 
new student with the institution, its location and surroundings, its courses of 
instruction, its recreational activities and other phases of its life is arranged for 
the opening week. Unless arrangements for room and board are made previously, 
the first two days of the week may be used for this purpose. Physical examinations 
as well as certain other tests are given during this orientation period. Freshman 
week enables the student to secure the advantages which come from acquaintance 
with his surroundings, his instructors, the members of his class, student organiza- 
tions, activities and customs. The overcrowding of the first week of classes with 
distractions is thus avoided. 

*£ Registration. — All upper classmen are required to register on or before the 
Monday of the week beginning the school year, and all students during the midyear 
examination period. For unexcused delay in registration a fee of $5 will be imposed. 


14 

Sessions —The regular school sessions are in general from 9.00 a.m. to 
12.50 p.m., and from 1.55 to 4.45 p.m., except Saturdays, when no classes are held. 
On Saturday afternoons the buildings are dosed. 

An hour plan designates the hours at which the various classes meet I his is 
rigidly adhered to, and the student is marked for his attendance and work as 

therein scheduled. „ , , r 

Attendance. — Attendance is required of all students on fourteen-Mteenths 
of all scheduled class exercises, provided they meet the requirements of their 
instructors for the omitted exercises. For every unexcused absence from any class 
exercise in excess of those allowed, a deduction from the mark obtained in the 
course in which the absences occurred will be made. , 

Advisers.— Advisers are appointed for all students, to be of such aid and as- 
sistance as they can both inside and outside of school hours. The head of the 
department in which a student is registered is adviser to upper-classmen, and 
instructors in charge of freshmen classes act as advisers to freshmen. 

Conduct.— Students are required to return to the proper place all instru- 
ments or apparatus used in experimental work, and to leave clean and m working 
order all machinery and apparatus with which they may experiment. All break- 
ages, accidents or irregularities of any kind must be reported immediately to th 

head’ of the department or instructor in charge. 

Irregular attendance, lack of punctuality, neglect of either school or home work, 
disorderly or ungentlemanly conduct or general insubordination are considered 
good and sufficient reasons for the immediate suspension of a student, and a report 
to the trustees for such action as they deem necessary to take 

It is the aim of the trustees so to admimster the discipline of the Institute as to 
maintain a high standard of integrity and a scrupulous regard for trust. I he 
attempt of any student to present, as his own, work which he has not performed, 
or to* 1 pass an examination by improper means is regarded by the trustees as a 
most serious offense, and renders the offender liable to immediate suspension or 
expulsion. The aiding or abetting of a student in any dishonesty is also held to 

b6 Any 1 Student' who Violates these provisions will be immediately suspended by 
the president, and the case reported at the following meeting of the trustees for 

^Examinations. — For first-year students examinations are held every five 
weeks, and these serve to inform the student concerning his standing and the 

Pr For e stu r deSs in upper classes examinations will be held during the eighth week 

of each term. , . . , , 

Final examinations are held at the end of each term. , , . 

In general, the examinations cover the work of the preceding term, but at the 
discretion of the instructor may include work of earlier terms. . 

Examinations for students conditioned in first-term subjects are held during 
the second term, and examinations for students conditioned in the second-term 
subiects are held in September following. Students requesting condition examina- 
tions at other than scheduled dates will be required to pay $5 for each examination 

S °Any e student who fails to complete a subject satisfactorily or to dew ^a condition 
at the time appointed, will be required to repeat the subject, and he cannot be 

a “e»t S l£ a whole so low that he cannot continue 
with profit the work of the next term will be required to leave, but he may return 
the following year to repeat such subjects as are required. . 

1 Daily work and regularity of attendance are considered in making up the reports 

° f Records "and Reports of Standing.-During each term informal reports are 
sent to parents or guardians of all students under age, and to all students; and 

at the end of each term formal reports are made. 

The daily work of the student forms an important part of his record, and o 
pupil will be awarded the diploma or degree unless this portion of his record is 

clear. 


15 

Books are prescribed for study, for entry of lecture notes and other exercises, 
and are periodically examined by the lecturers. The care and accuracy with which 
these books are kept are considered in determining standing. 

Thesis. — Each candidate for the degree of the Institute must file with the head 
of the department in which the thesis is taken, and not later than May 15, a report 
of original investigation or research, written on a good quality of paper, 8 }/% by 11 
inches, with one-inch margin at left, and one-half inch at right, of each page; such 
thesis to have been previously approved by the head of the department in which 
it is made. 

For all candidates for the diploma this requirement will be optional on the 
part of the Institute. 

Library and Reading Room. — That the students may have surroundings 
conducive to reading and study a moderate-sized reading room with library tables 
and chairs has been provided. The library shelves contain textile, art, engineering 
and scientific publications. These are increased from time to time as new technical 
books of value to textile students are issued from the press. The leading textile 
papers are kept on file for ready reference. 

FEES, DEPOSITS, ETC. 

Tuition Fee. — The fee for the day course is $150 per year for residents of Massa- 
chusetts. For non-residents the fee for all courses is $200 per year. The fee for 
students from foreign countries is $300 per year. 

Three-fifths of the fee is charged for a single term. Each term’s tuition is payable 
during the first week of that term. Students failing to make this payment at 
the specified time will be excused from classes until satisfactory explanation and 
arrangements for payment can be made. After payment is made no fee or part 
thereof can be returned, except by special action of the trustees. 

Special students pay, in general, the full fee, but if a course be taken involving 
attendance at the school during a limited time, application may be made to the 
president for a reduction. 

Students entering from Massachusetts are required to file with the Bursar a 
statement signed by either town or city clerk, stating that the applicants father is 
a legal resident of Massachusetts. 

Athletic Fee. — An athletic fee of $15 is due and payable at the time of the first 
payment of tuition. 

Deposits. — For all first-year students a minimum deposit of $25 is required to 
cover the cost of breakage, supplies, apparatus and chemicals used in the Chemical 
Laboratory, the unexpended balance to be returned to the student at the end 
of the year. For all students in second, third, and fourth years taking work in 
Chemistry and Dyeing Laboratories a deposit of $25 for the first term and $25 
for the second term is required. 

Students taking Machine Shop will be required to make deposit of $15 to cover 
cost of materials, supplies and breakage. Included in this charge is a kit of tools 
which is essential to the work and which becomes the personal property of the 
student. The unexpended balance will be returned at the end of the year. 

Students not taking Chemistry Laboratory or Machine Shop will be required 
to make a deposit of $10 each year to cover general breakage. The unexpended 
balance will be returned at the end of the year. 

All deposits must be made before students can be admitted for laboratory work. 

Rooms and Board. — Students from a distance, requiring rooms and board in 
the city, may, if they desire, select same from a list which is kept at the Institute. 
The cost of rooms and board in a good district is $12 per week and upwards. 

Books and Materials. — Students must provide their own books, stationery, 
tools, etc., and pay for any breakage or damage that they cause. The above fee 
includes free admission for any day students desiring to attend any of the evening 
classes in which there is accommodation. 

Each student must provide himself with proper outer garments and wear them 
in such a manner when working in the various laboratories that clothing and per- 
son will be protected and not endangered by moving machinery or chemicals. 

All raw stock and yarn furnished to the students, and all the productions of the 
Institute, remain or become its property, except by special arrangement; but each 
student is allowed to retain specimens of yarn or fabrics that he has produced, if 


$150 

200 

300 

25 

50 

15 

15 

10 


50 


16 

mounted and tabulated in accordance with the requirements of the department. 

It is understood that the department may retain such specimens of students work 

as they may determine. ^ . 

Lockers are provided for the use of the students, sufficiently capacious to con- 
tain clothing, books and tools. _ . T , « , . , , . 0 D+11 

No books, instruments or other property of the Institute are loaned to the stu- 
dents to be removed from the premises except by special permission. 

Summary of Expenses per Year 

Tuition (residents of Massachusetts) 

Tuition (residents of other States) 

Tuition (foreigners) 

Chemistry laboratory deposit (1st year) 

Chemistry laboratory deposit (2d, 3d and 4th years) 

Athletic fee 
Machine shop deposit 

General breakage fee , 

(This applies to students who do not take chemistry or machine 

shop.) 

Books and supplies , J _ __ , , 

(Books and supplies for the first year cost about $80 second and 
third year $35, and fourth year $50, thus averaging about $50 per 
year for the four years.) 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Louis A. Olney Book Prizes.— Prizes in the form of books are awarded each 
year to the successful candidate on graduation day. The conditions in detail 

^ First.— Tea 'dollars to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship 

lU Second.— Mv^doUars to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the second highest 

S Tendollars^ to ^the regular student of the Chemistry and TextileColor- 

ing Course who shall be considered as having obtained the highest scholarship 

to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile 

Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the second high s 

scholarship during his second year. , r’v, 0 rm - =+rv and Textile 

Fifth.— Ten dollars to the student graduating from the Chemistry and Textile 

Coloring Course, who, in the opinion of the instructing staff of the departm , 
shall have maintained the highest scholarship throughout the course. 

The above-mentioned sums are to be invested in books which may be selected 
after graduation. In case no one is considered worthy of any particular scholar- 
ship prize, or if there is no competition, the same may be withheld. The decisio 

in such case shall rest with the judges. mno Nq 

The National Association of Cotton Manufacturers Medal.-The Na- 
tional Association of Cotton Manufacturers offers a medal to l^tandine in 
graduating class who, during his course, shall have attained the highest standing m 
special subjects required by the vote of the association. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 
School Publications.— The Text is issued bi-weekly and it contains news per- 
taining to activities in the Institute as well as information concerning alumni The 
Pickout is an annual publication in charge of a manager and ^rsdficted from 
the senior class. The board is composed of representatives from th® varioui s classes. 

Fraternities. — There are four fraternities, three of which are national and one 
is local They afford opportunity for social life desired in a college career. 

Dramatic Club.-The Dramatic Club gives annually p a tteteewmy 

the Lowell Auditorium. Appropriation is made from the profi ry 

of the Athletic Association. 


17 

Professional Clubs.— A Student Section of the American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers holds meetings regularly in accordance with requirements of the 
national organization. The Student Section of the American Society of Dyers and 
Colorists holds meetings at which papers are delivered or speakers come from outside 
the school organization. 

Rifle Club. — The rifle club offers opportunity to all students to attain proficiency 
in marksmanship and selects the team for interscholastic matches with other col- 
leges. 

Honor Society. — To degree candidates who have maintained a high scholar- 
ship for three years’ work, or who have met with certain similar requirements, is 
accorded the honor of membership in the society Tau Epsilon Sigma. Relatively 
a membership in this society corresponds to that in some of the well-known honor 
societies of the liberal arts and scientific colleges. It requires constant attendance 
and application to the work of the course for any student to reach the scholarship 
level entitling him to this membership. 

Honor Roll. — The President’s List includes upper classmen taking a regular 
course who have a general average of eighty percent and no deficiencies. 

Co-operative Society. — This society is maintained for the benefit of students 
who desire to purchase supplies and materials for use in connection with their work. 
It is operated under the direction of a manager and assistant manager and one 
or more clerks. The general business policy is under the supervision of a member 
of the faculty. Students who join the society are entitled to discount privileges 
when purchasing from the society and from certain firms in the city of Lowell. 


18 

Alumni Association. — The Alumni Association of the Institute holds its 
annual meeting and banquet in May of each year. 

The membership of the association is composed of graduates of the day courses 
and is open to any non-graduate who has attended the Institute for at least one 
year. 

Officers for the Year 1933-34 
Walker F. Prescott, '09, President 
Chester C. Pease, '09, Vice-President 
Arthur A. Stewart, '00, Secretary-Treasurer 

Communications should be addressed to Arthur A. Stewart, Lowell Textile 
Institute. 


Ex-Officio Members of Executive Committee 
Edward M. Abbot, '04 Thomas T. Clark, TO 

Henry A. Bodwell, '00 Frank L. McCool, TO 

Charles W. Churchill, '06 Stanley H. Wheelock, '05 

Royal P. White, '04 


Executive Committee 
15 Members 


Roy H. Bradford, '06 
Alexander Campbell, '23 
Earl W. Clark, '18 
James F. Dewey, '04 
Russell T. Fisher, '14 
Olin D. Gay, '08 
Frederic S. Gilley, T6 

A. Edwin 


Arnold J. Midwood, '05 
Brackett Parsons, '20 
Richard W. Rawhnson, '31 
Everett B. Rich, '11 
Dean W. Symmes, '22 
Philip H. Warren, '05 
J. Milton Washburn, '21 

i, '20 


19 


SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 

In the column headed “Hours of Exercise” the numbers represent for each 
particular subject the total hours required in school for a period of fifteen weeks. 

The letter and number which follow the subjects indicate the department in 
which the subject is given and the number of the subject in that, department. For 
detailed description of the same, see page 34. 

The departments are indicated as follows: — 


Textile Engineering .... B 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring . C 

Textile Design and Power Weaving D 

Languages and History ... E 


Cotton Yarns F 

Woolen and Worsted Yarns . . G 

Finishing H 


By referring to the letter and number indicated under “Preparation” the student 
can ascertain what subjects are necessary in order that he may have a clear under- 
standing of the subject which he is scheduled to take. 


First Year 
First Term 

(Common to all Courses) 


Hours of 
Exercise 

Elementary Chemistry C-10 105 

English E-10 45 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanical Drawing B-13 135 

Physics B-ll 75 

Physical Education 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis D-10 75 

Second Term 

Course Course 
IY VI 

Elementary Chemistry C-10 75 75 

Elementary German E-ll 30 - 

English E-10 45 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 or B-13a 45 120 

Mathematics B-10 60 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 60 

Physical Education 30 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-ll or C-lla 150 45 

Stoichiometry C-12 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis D-10 - 90 


For second-term subjects in Courses I, II, and III, see pages 21, 23, 25. 


20 


Course I. — Cotton Manufacture 

The Cotton Manufacturing Course is designed for students contemplating a 
career in the manufacturing of cotton yarns, cloth or allied industries, and wishing 
to devote but three years to instruction at the Institute. 

During the first term the studies are common to all courses, and include in- 
struction in mathematics, mechanical drawing, physics, textile design and ele- 
mentary chemistry. 

During the second term, lectures in organic chemistry are given followed by 
lectures in textile chemistry and dyeing the second year. The work in mechanism 
serves as a basis for all future machine and mechanical work, and is followed by 
steam engineering, electricity and mill engineering. The course in textile designing, 
cloth analysis and cloth construction includes lectures on plain, fancy and Jacquard 
weaves, the analysis of all commercial fabrics, and designs for the same. 

Power weaving is taken up during the second and third years. Commencing 
with lectures and practice upon plain looms, the instruction continues with dobby, 
box-loom, and Jacquard weaving. 

A course in knitting taken during the third year includes the manufacture of 
flat goods, hosiery and underwear. Considerable laboratory practice accompanies 
the lecture work, giving the students actual working knowledge of a wide range of 
knitting machines. Instruction in the finishing of cotton fabrics is given by lectures 
and laboratory work, and requires considerable work on standard machines in the 
laboratory. Textile testing, also given in the third year, instructs the student in 
standard methods for physical testing of textile material. 

The course in cotton carding is given in the second year. The instruction 
covers the production of cotton throughout the world, the classing of various cot- 
tons and the various methods of marketing the cotton crop. Particular emphasis 
is given to the American cotton crop. The treatment of cotton in the mill processes 
covers all the operations preparatory to spinning, for the regular cotton system 
and for the cotton waste systems. Opening, picking, carding, combing, drawing 
and roving are the operations included. Lectures supplement the material available 
in text books in order to have the course up to date. Considerable time is spent in 
the laboratory studying cotton fibers, classing, processing stock and making various 
tests on the adjustment of machines and the effect on the quality of the work 
produced. 

The third year’s work continues that of the second year, with detailed study of 
spinning, spooling, twisting and winding. Another course gives instruction in mill 
organization, balancing and arranging machinery in the mill. Finally, a brief 
course is given in the use of the microscope and camera in studying various prob- 
lems in cotton manufacture. Laboratory practice supplements the lecture course, 
giving practical operation, adjustment and observation of the machines studied. 
Advanced laboratory work illustrates the methods of study and analysis of the 
more general and complex problems such as are usually handled in the laboratory 
of a textile plant. 

During both the second and third years, particular attention is given to the 
preparation of the various reports in order that the. student may learn proper 
methods for presenting data and conclusions resulting from mill studies and tests. 

During the third year, each student makes some original study, usually of a 
technical nature. He must make a formal report of this study satisfactory to the 
faculty before receiving his diploma. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


21 


Course I. — Cotton Manufacture 
[For first term see page 19] 


First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry C-10 . 

. 75 

Physical Education 

30 

English E-10 

. 45 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla 

45 

Machine Drawing B-13 

. 120 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 


Mathematics B-10 .... 

. 60 

D-10 

90 

Mechanism B-12 .... 

. 60 



Second Year. 

First Term 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20 

. 255 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Lect. C-20 

30 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 90 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 


Steam Engineering B-24 

. 30 

tion D-20 

75 

Second Year. 

Second Term 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20 

. 225 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Lect. C— 20 

30 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 150 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 




tion D-20 

75 

Third Year. 

First Term 


Cotton Finishing H-31 . 

. 75 

Mill Engineering B-34a 

30 

Cotton Organization F-32 . 

. 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

135 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30 

. 165 

Textile Testing G-31 .... 

30 

Electricity B-31a .... 

. 30 

Thesis F-34. 


Third Year. 

Second Term 


Cotton Finishing H-31 . 

. 75 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

120 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30 

. 210 

Thesis F-34. 


Knitting F-31 

. 120 




22 


Course II. — Wool Manufacture 

The course on wool manufacturing is arranged for those who contemplate a 
career in the manufacture of woolen or worsted fabrics, and can devote but three 
years to the school work. It includes instruction on all of the varied processes 
employed in manipulating the wool fiber to produce yarn and cloth, namely, sort- 
ing, scouring, carding, combing, spinning, designing, weaving, dyeing and finishing. 
The work is carried on by lectures, recitations and practical work in the laboratories. 

Beginning with the second year the details of manipulating wool from the grease 
to the finished yarn is taken up for close study. This includes the spinning of 
woolen yarn, also worsted yarn, by both the English and the French systems. 
The intermediate processes of sorting, scouring, carding, combing and top-manu- 
facturing are taken in detail and in proper sequence. 

The general chemistry of the first year is followed by a lecture course in the 
second year on textile chemistry and dyeing. 

Textile design, cloth analysis and construction are continued from the first 
year throughout the course, the work being applied especially to woolen and 
worsted goods. Weaving on power looms commences in the second year and con- 
tinues through the third. 

A course in knitting taken during the third year includes the manufacture of 
flat goods, hosiery and underwear. Considerable laboratory practice accompanies 
the lecture work, giving the students actual working knowledge of a wide range of 
knitting machines. 

Lectures on finishing commence with the third year and are augmented by 
extensive practice with the machines in the Finishing Department. 

Work in the Engineering Department extends throughout all three years, and 
includes mechanical drawing, steam engineering and electricity. The practical 
application of the principles studied in these subjects is brought out forcibly in the 
work on mill engineering, where mill design and construction are considered. A 
short course covering methods employed in the testing of fibers, yarns, and cloths, 
together with laboratory work in the manipulation of certain physical apparatus, 
is given in the third year. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


23 


Course II. — Wool Manufacture 

[For first term see page 19] 


First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry C-10 . 

. 75 

Physical Education 

30 

English E-10 

. 45 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla 

45 

Machine Drawing B-13 

. 120 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 


Mathematics B-10 .... 

. 60 

D-10 

90 

Mechanism B-12 .... 

. 60 



Second Year. 

First Term 


Fiber Preparation G— 20-21 

. 240 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Lect. C-20 

30 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 105 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 


Steam Engineering B-24 

. 30 

tion D— 21 

75 

Second Year. 

Second Term 


Fiber Preparation G-20-21 

. 270 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Lect. C— 20 

30 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 120 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 




tion D-21 

60 

Third Year. 

First Term 


Electricity B-31a .... 

. 30 

Textile Testing G- 31 .... 

30 

Mill Engineering B-34a 

. 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 


Power Weaving D-32 . 

. 135 

H-30 

75 


Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 

225 

Third Year. 

Second Term 


Knitting F-31 

. 120 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 

210 

Power Weaving D-32 . 

. 120 

Thesis. 



Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 


75 


24 


Course III. — Textile Design 

The general course in textile design is planned to meet the demand of young 
men for a technical training in the general processes of textile manufacturing, 
but with particular reference to the design and construction of fabrics. To this 
end a foundation is laid in the first year by instruction in the elementary principles 
of designing, decorative art and weaving. That he may later in the course pursue 
to advantage instruction in yarn manufacturing, weaving, dyeing, finishing and 
some engineering problems, a foundation course in mechanics, mathematics and 
chemistry is laid. As the student is required to pursue courses in the yarn de- 
partments, both cotton and wool, he acquires a knowledge of the manufacture of 
cotton yarns from the bale to the yarn, and of woolen and worsted yarns from 
the fleece through the varied processes of manufacturing woolen yarn or worsted 
yarn by both the French and Bradford systems. 

Throughout his entire course he receives instruction in design, cloth analysis 
and construction of all the standard cloths, viz., trouserings, coatings, suitings, 
blankets, velvets, corduroys, plushes, etc. This is followed by advanced work 
in Jacquard designing and weaving, which serves not only to acquaint the student 
with the many kinds of cotton, woolen, worsted and silk fabrics of figured design, 
but stimulates and develops any artistic talent he may possess. Decorative art 
becomes an important part of the work of the second and third years. 

The course in general inorganic and organic chemistry of the first year leads 
to the subject of textile chemistry and dyeing in the second year. 

Power weaving commences with the second year and continues throughout 
the course, and work on all types of looms is required. 

During the third year the student receives instruction in the finishing of cotton 
goods and woolen and worsted cloths. This instruction is given by means of 
lecture and laboratory work. 

The engineering subjects given in the second and third years are intended to 
acquaint the student with such general knowledge as will be of assistance should 
he be called upon in later life to be a mill manager, or should his subsequent progress 
lead to some executive position in the operation of a textile plant. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


25 


Course III.— Textile Design 

[For first term see page 19] 

First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry C-10 . . 75 

English E-10 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 . . . 120 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 90 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 90 

Steam Engineering B-24 ... 30 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 75 

Fiber Preparation G-20-21 . . 90 

Jacquard Design D-23 .... 45 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 . . . .105 

Third Year. 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . . . .75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 60 

Textile Design and Cloth Con- 
struction D-30 135 

Third Year. 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . . . .75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Jacquard Design D-31 .... 75 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 105 
Textile Design and Cloth Con- 
struction D-30 75 


Physical Education ..... 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla . . 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 
D-10 90 


First Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C— 20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 240 


Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 135 

First Term 

Textile Testing G-31 .... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 

H-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 90 

Second Term 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 

H-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 60 

Thesis. 


26 


Course IV. — Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

The four-year course in Chemistry and Textile Coloring, leading to the degree 
of B.T.C., is especially intended for those who wish to engage in any branch of 
textile chemistry, textile coloring, bleaching, finishing or the manufacture and 
sale of the dyestuffs or chemicals used in the textile industry. The theory and 
practice of all branches of dyeing, printing, bleaching, scouring and finishing are 
taught by lecture work supplemented by a large amount of experimental laboratory 
work and actual practice in the dyehouse and finishing room. 

The underlying theories and principles of chemistry are the same, no matter 
to what industry the application is eventually made. Furthermore, no industry 
involves more advanced and varied applications of the science of chemistry than 
those of the manufacture and application of the coal-tar coloring matters. In 
addition, the textile colorist must consider the complex composition of the textile 
fibers, and the obscure reactions which take place between them and the other 
materials of the textile industry. 

During the first year general chemistry, including both inorganic and organic, 
is taught by lectures and laboratory work, and this is supplemented during the 
second term by qualitative analysis and stoichiometry. 

Advanced inorganic chemistry, as well as advanced organic chemistry, is studied 
during the second and third year as a continuation of the elementary chemistry 
of the first year, and much time is spent upon quantitative analysis, industrial 
chemistry, and textile chemistry and dyeing. 

The foundation work in general chemistry is continued during the third year 
with courses in physical chemistry, organic laboratory work and analytical work. 
The subject of industrial chemistry is introduced, and much time is devoted to 
advanced textile chemistry, dye testing, color matching, calico printing, and woolen, 
worsted and cotton finishing. 

The fourth year is characterized by an endeavor to present certain subjects of a 
more applied nature in such a manner that the student’s reasoning power and 
ability to apply the knowledge gained during the first three years may be developed 
to the fullest extent. The subject of engineering chemistry is introduced, and the 
work in the dyeing and analytical laboratories is applied as far as possible to the 
actual requirements of the factory chemist and colorist. Much time is also spent in 
the organic chemistry laboratory, particular attention being given to the prepara- 
tion of typical dyestuffs. Thorough courses are given in microscopy, photo- 
micrography and the use of various instruments such as the spectroscope, ultra- 
microscope, polariscope, tintometer and other optical instruments applicable to 
experimental work in connection with the textile industry. Courses are also given 
in report writing and textile literature. 

During this fourth year the student has an opportunity to take several optional 
subjects of an advanced nature and conduct such research work and original 
investigation as time may permit. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


27 


Course IV. — Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Advanced German E-21 . . .4 5 

Adv. Organic Chemistry C-22 . 30 

English E-20 30 

Mathematics B-20a .... 60 

Physics B-23 65 

Power Weaving D-23 .... 15 

Second Year. 
Advanced German E-21 ... 45 

Adv. Organic Chemistry C-22 . 30 

English E-20 30 

Physics B-23 65 

Quantitative Analysis C-23 . .150 

Third Year. 

Adv. Organic Chemistry Lect. 

C-34 15 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-32 135 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-32 30 

Third Year. 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-32 75 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-32 15 

Economics E-30 45 

Industrial Chemistry C-31 . . 30 

Organic Laboratory C-36 ... 90 

Fourth Year. 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-44 90 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-44 30 

Chemical Textile Testing C-43 . 45 

Industrial Chemistry C-42 . . 30 

Microscopy and Photomicroscopy 
C-45 60 

Fourth Year. 
Advanced General Chemistry C-49 30 
Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-44 90 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-44 15 

Chemical Textile Testing C-43 . 45 

Engineering Chemistry C-50 . . 45 


Quantitative Analysis C-23 . .130 

Stoichiometry C-24 ..... 15 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lab. C-21 90 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 45 

Second Term 

Stoichiometry C-24 15 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lab. C-21 145 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 45 

First Term 

Economics E-30 45 

Physical Chemistry C-33 ... 45 

Quantitative Analysis C-30 . .150 

Technical German C-35 ... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Physical Chemistry C-33 ... 45 

Photography C-37 15 

Quantitative Analysis C-30 . . 105 

Technical German C-35 ... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

First Term 

Options or Thesis C-52 ... 90 

Organic Laboratory C-41 ... 90 

Quantitative Analysis C-46 . . 15 

Report Writing C-47 .... 15 

Technical German C-40 ... 30 

Textile Marketing B-42 ... 30 


Second Term 

Options or Thesis C-52 ... 90 

Organic Laboratory C-41 . . 105 

Rayon Manufacturing C-51 . 30 

Technical German C-40 ... 30 

Technology of Wool and Allied 

Fibers G-40 15 

Textile Literature C-48 . . .15 


28 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering 

This course is the four-year general textile course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Textile Engineering (B.T.E.), and aims especially to fit men, in the broadest 
possible manner, to meet the increasing demands of every branch of the textile 
industry for men with combined textile and technical preparation. The magni- 
tude and scope of the textile and allied industries fully justify the most thorough 
technical training possible for all who aspire to leadership in this field. 

The student is first thoroughly grounded in those fundamental principles of 
science upon which all industrial and engineering work rests. The foundation of 
his textile and technical training is in the subjects of mathematics, physics, chem- 
istry, drawing, mechanics, mechanism, and technology of fibers, and their practical 
application. 

Instruction is given in all the various branches of textile manufacturing 
through lectures, recitations and laboratory work. A large proportion of his time 
is spent in well-equipped textile departments where he studies and operates all 
of the machinery required in the conversion of cotton and wool fiber into yarns 
and fabrics. This includes cotton, wool and worsted yarn manufacturing, design- 
ing, weaving, knitting, dyeing and finishing. In his last year the course in textile 
testing acquaints the student with the methods for determining the physical 
properties of textile fibers, yarns and fabrics. 

To properly equip the student to meet the varied engineering problems which 
confront the mill manager or executive, or to so train him that he may enter those 
industries closely allied to the textile, instruction is given by lecture and laboratory 
practice in the several branches of engineering. 

Steam engineering considers the problems involved in steam generation and 
distribution for power, heating and manufacturing purposes, and includes the testing 
of laboratory and power plant equipment. The course in electrical engineering 
treats of the generation and transmission of electrical power, the testing of direct 
and alternating current machinery, and is intended to acquaint the student with 
modern practice. 

Mill engineering familiarizes the student with mill design, construction, heating, 
lighting, humidification and fire protection. The arrangement of machinery and 
buildings for most efficient production and economical power distribution is also 
studied in detail. 

The broadening effect of such subjects as English and economics is carried still 
further in this course by carefully planned courses in business administration, ac- 
counting, cost accounting and business law. 

During the fourth year the student is required to conduct an original investiga- 
tion of some textile or allied problem, and to submit the results in the form of a 
satisfactory thesis before receiving his degree. 

For the student who may desire the breadth of technical training which this 
course offers, but who wishes to specialize in either cotton or wool manufacturing, 
two options are offered. In these optional courses the student’s entire textile time 
is devoted to the study of that particular fiber which he elects. Provision is also 
made for the substitution of knitting for weaving laboratory time in the case of 
those who prefer to lay more emphasis on knit fabrics. 

During the past few years a demand has come from the distributing or marketing 
branches of the textile business for men with a four years’ technical training. With 
the idea of offering courses which may better prepare graduates to meet this new 
call, the new Sales Option Course is offered. 

There are also requests for a four-year Design Course which, while majoring in 
Textile Design, includes other subjects that help to make a broader course than 
the one of three years’ duration. For this purpose the Design Option Course is 
offered. Like the other courses outlined, these will be subject to changes to meet 
new demands. 

For detailed description of subjects, see page 34. The curricula of the several 
optional courses will be found on pages 29 to 33. 


29 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (General Course-G) 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20 ; 21 . . 120 

Machine Drawing B-21 ... 60 

Machine Shop B-26 . . .75 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Second Year. 
Applied Mechanics B-25 ... 45 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . 90 

Machine Drawing B-21 ... 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Third Year. 

Applied Mechanics B-30 ... 45 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Heat Engineering B-32 . . .75 

Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Heat Engineering B-33 ... 90 


Physics B-23 75 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lecture C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-22 45 

Second Term 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 . . .75 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

First Term 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 60 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Mill Engineering B-34 .... 90 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Fourth Year. 

First Term 


Accounting B-40 .... 

. 90 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

. . 75 

Cotton Organization F-32 . 

. 90 

Textile Marketing B-42 

. . 30 

Electrical Engineering B-44 

. 75 

Textile Testing B-43 

. . 45 

Microscopy B-41 .... 

. 45 

Thesis 

. . 75 

Fourth Year. 

Second Term 


Business Administration B-46J . 

. 90 

Knitting F-31a .... 

. . 30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . 

. 105 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

. . 75 

Electives B-48 


Mill Illumination B-47 . 

. . 45 

Electrical Engineering B-44 

. 75 

Thesis 

. . 105 


30 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Cotton Option-C) 

[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a 

. 225 

Physics B-23 . . 


75 

Machine Drawing B-21 

. 90 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Machine Shop B-26 

. 45 

Lecture C-20 . 


30 

Mathematics B-20 .... 

. 60 




Second 

Year. 

Second Term 



Applied Mechanics B-25 

. 45 

Physics B-23 


75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a 

. 165 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. . 

105 

Machine Drawing B-21 

. 45 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Mathematics B-20 .... 

. 60 

Lect. C— 20 


30 

Third 

Year. 

First Term 



Applied Mechanics B-30 

. 45 

Heat Engineering B-32 


75 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . 

. 75 

Power Weaving D-32 . 


45 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a 

. 120 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Economics E-30 

. 45 

tion D-20 .... 


45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 

. 75 




Third Year. 

Second Term 



Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a 

. 150 

Mill Engineering B-34 . 


90 

Economics E-30 

. 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Electrical Engineering B-31 

. 75 

tion D-20 .... 


75 

Heat Engineering B-33 

. 90 




Fourth Year. 

. First Term 



Accounting B-40 .... 

. 90 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Cotton Organization F-32 . 

. 105 

tion D-30 .... 


30 

Electrical Engineering B-44 

. 75 

Textile Marketing B-42 


30 

Microscopy B-41 .... 

. 45 

Textile Testing B-43 


45 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

. 30 

Thesis 


75 

Fourth 

Year. 

Second Term 



Business Administration B-46 . 

. 90 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 


30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . 

. 75 

Mill Illumination B-47 . 


45 

Electrical Engineering B-44 

. 75 

Thesis 


105 

Knitting F-31a . ... 

. 105 





31 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Wool Op tion- W) 


[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 



Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 

. 225 

Physics B-23 


75 

Machine Drawing B-21 

. 90 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Machine Shop B-26 

. 45 

Lecture C-20 . 

... 

30 

Mathematics B-20 .... 

. 60 




Second 

Year. 

Second Term 



Applied Mechanics B-25 

. 45 

Physics B-23 . . . 

. . . 

75 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 

. 165 

Power Weaving D-24 . 


105 

Machine Drawing B-21 

. 45 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Mathematics B-20 .... 

. 60 

Lect. C— 20 


30 

Third Year. 

First Term 



Applied Mechanics B-30 . 

. 45 

Power Weaving D-32 . 


60 

Economics E-30 

. 45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 

150 

Electrical Engineering B-31 

. 75 

Woolen and Worsted 

Finishing 


Heat Engineering B-32 

. 75 

H-30 


75 

Third Year. 

Second Term 



Economics E-30 

. 45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 

150 

Electrical Engineering B-31 

. 75 

Woolen and Worsted 

Finishing 


Heat Engineering B-33 

. 90 

H-30 

* 

75 

Mill Engineering B-34 . 

. 90 




Fourth Year. 

First Term 



Accounting B-40 .... 

. 90 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Electrical Engineering B-44 

. 75 

tion D-21 .... 


75 

Microscopy B-41 .... 

. 45 

Textile Marketing B^2 


30 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

. 30 

Textile Testing B-43 


45 



Thesis 


135 

Fourth 

Year. 

Second Term 



Business Administration B-46 . 

. 90 

Mill Illumination B-47 . 


45 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . 

. 75 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Knitting F-31a 

. 30 

tion D-21 .... 


60 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

. 30 

Thesis 


195 


32 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Design Option-D) 

[For first year see page 19] 


Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


60 

90 

60 

75 


Textile Chemistry ajid Dyeing 

Lecture C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 210 


Second Year. First 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 

Fiber Preparation G-20,21 . 

Mathematics B-20 

Physics B-23 

Second Year. 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 


Second Term 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. 020 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 105 


Third Year. First Term 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 120 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 135 


Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Third Year. 

Second Term 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Textile Physics B-37 .... 

45 

Economics E-30 

45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 

90 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

135 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 


Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 


H-30 

75 

tion D-30 

75 



Fourth Year. First Term 


Accounting B-40 

90 

Textile Marketing B-42 

30 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 

90 

Textile Styling B-50 .... 

30 

Microscopy B-41 

45 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 

45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 


Thesis 

75 

tion D-41 

120 



Fourth Year. 

Second Term 


Business Administration B-46 . 

90 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 


Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 

105 

tion D-41 

120 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 120 

Thesis 

90 


33 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Sales Option-S) 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 

Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 75 

Principles of Marketing B-35 . . 45 

Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Marketing Methods B-36 ... 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 30 

Statistics 45 

Fourth Year 

Accounting B-40 90 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 45 

Microscopy B-41 45 

Principles of Selling and Advertis- 
ing B-49 105 

Selling Policies B-52 .... 45 

Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 105 
Foreign Trade and Economic Geog- 
raphy B-51 45 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lecture C-20 ...... 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 210 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C— 20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 105 

First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 135 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G— 30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 75 

Textile Physics B-37 .... 45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

. First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-41 45 

Textile Styling B-50 .... 30 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 45 

Thesis 75 

Second Term 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 45 

Knitting F-31a 75 

Selling Policies B-52 .... 45 

Thesis 120 


34 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT— B 

The various options are designated by G, C, W, D, S. 

Mathematics — B-10. Preparation: Admission Requirements. The work 
in the first term consists of algebra, plane trigonometry, and instruction in the use 
of the slide-rule. Algebra is reviewed through quadratics and then logarithms are 
taken. In plane trigonometry, right and oblique triangles are solved by means of 
natural and logarithmic functions, and the various algebraic relations among the 
trigonometric functions are proved and used in identities and equations. Significant 
figures and the use of approximate data in calculations are also discussed. 

In the second term the following topics are taken up : graphical and mathematical 
solution of quadratic and simultaneous equations, theory of equations, partial 
fractions, Naperian logarithms, equations of the straight line, equations of various 
curves, differentiation of algebraic functions, and applications of the derivative. 
[All courses.] 

Physics — B-ll. Preparation: Admission Requirements. Taken simul- 
taneously with B-10. This subject is required as a necessary preparation for 
all courses, and is given during the first term of the first year. The fundamental 
principles of this subject are considered absolutely essential to a thorough under- 
standing of the operation of all machinery, textile or otherwise. Some of the topics 
treated in this course are linear and angular velocity, uniform and accelerated 
motion, mass, momentum, inertia, effect of force in producing motion, centrifugal 
force, work, power, energy, principle of moments and its applications, parallelo- 
gram and triangle of forces with applications, resolution and composition of forces, 
the mechanical principles represented by the wheel and axle, differential pulley 
block, common pulley blocks, jackscrew, worm and wheel, inclined plane, hydro- 
statics, elements of hydraulics, kinetic energy, circular motion and harmonic 
motion. 

Laboratory. This course is supplementary to the lecture course and gives the 
student an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in the lecture course by 
performing various experiments. [All courses.] 

Mechanism — B-12. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject is also 
deemed to be one of those absolutely essential to every student’s preparation for 
the work of the following years. Whereas the principles studied are of general 
application, textile machinery in particular furnishes an unusually large variety 
of specific examples, and frequent reference is made to these in the development 
of the course. Some of the important topics covered are gearing and gear train 
design, belting and pulley calculations, cone and stepped pulley design, cam design, 
linkages, epicyclic gear trains, and intermittent motion devices. [All courses.] 

Mechanical Drawing — B-13. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
Taken simultaneously with B-ll. This course is taken during the first year 
and consists of work in the drawing room supplemented by lectures. This sub- 
ject is considered of the greatest importance as a preparation for the student’s 
future work, and the practical usefulness of drawing of this character is fully 
emphasized. This course is systematically laid out covering in order the following 
divisions: — 

Care and use of drawing instruments; geometrical constructions; lettering; 
elements of projections and descriptive geometry; isometric projection; develop- 
ments with practical applications; sketching practice on machine details; work- 
ing drawings; tracing and blueprinting. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Machine Drawing — B-13a. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
Taken simultaneously with B-ll. This course is similar to B-13, but not so 
extensive, and is given to students electing the Chemistry and Textile Coloring 
course. [Course IV.] 

Mathematics — B-20. Preparation: B-10. This subject is a continuation 
of the first year subject B-10, and extends throughout the second year of the engi- 
neering course. In the first term the following topics are treated: — derivatives 
and differentials, the circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, indefinite integrals, 


35 

summation by integration and applications of integration. In the second term the 
topics are: differentiation of transcendental functions, methods of integration, 
centers of gravity, moments of inertia, empirical formulas, and nomographic 
charts. [Course VI.] 

Mathematics— B-20a. Preparation: B-10. This subject is a continuation 
of the work of the first year subject B-10. A study of the derivatives and differen- 
tials is followed by applications of the differential to rates and errors. Other topics 
treated are the circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, indefinite integrals, summation 
by integration, areas, volumes, pressures, exponential, logarithmic, and trigono- 
metric functions. [Course IV.] 

Machine Drawing — B-21. Preparation: B-10, B-I2, B-14. The work in 
Machine Drawing is devoted to working detail drawings of textile machinery and 
advanced graphical mechanism problems. In every case the data for all of these 
problems are taken directly from some of the textile machines that the students use 
in other departments. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Physics — B-23. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject lays the founda- 
tion for later work in engineering and chemistry and also explains the general 
application of the laws and principles of physics. Instruction, consisting of lectures, 
demonstrations, and recitations, is given for three hours per week during the second 
year. The topics taken up the first term are: — thermometry, measurement of heat, 
change of state, expansion, transfer of heat, humidity, the vernier, wave motion 
and sound. 

The second term is devoted to the study of light, magnetism, and electricity. 
Some of the topics are: — nature and propagation of light, reflection and refraction 
lenses, the telescope and microscope, the spectroscope, color sensation, double 
refraction, magnetism, electrostatics, fundamental laws of direct currents and 
electrolysis. 

Laboratory. A two-hour period per week for Course VI and a three-hour 
period every alternate week for Course IV accompanies the class work in this 
subject and is planned to illustrate precise methods for measuring various physi- 
cal quantities. [Courses IV, VI.] 

Physics — B-23a. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject consists of 
the same topics as B-23 but does not contain any laboratorv work. [Courses I, 

II, III.] 

Steam Engineering — B-24. Preparation: B-12. This course consists of 
thirty lectures given in the first term of the second year. Its aim is to give those 
students who do not take the Textile Engineering Course a general knowledge of 
thermodynamics, the steam engine, steam turbine and gas engine and their auxili- 
aries, and waste heat reclamation. [Courses I, II, III.] 

Applied Mechanics— B-25. Preparation: B-ll, B-20. This course is 
divided into two parts: Graphic Statics and Strength of Materials. The first eight 
weeks of the semester which is devoted to Graphic Statics consists of the study of 
mathematical and graphical solutions for any system of forces. Centers of gravity 
and funicular polygons are introduced followed by roof and bridge truss problems 
under various conditions of dead, live, wind, and snow loading. 

During the second half of the semester and during all the following semester, 
this course deals with Strength of Materials. So far as time permits, such topics 
as stress, strain, methods of testing materials, bending moments, shearing force, 
beam design, torsion, design of shafts, compound beams and columns, combined 
stresses, and like subjects are considered. 

This subject is preparatory to the work in Mill Engineering of both the third 
and fourth years, at which time its practical value and application are clearly 
demonstrated. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Machine Shop Practice — B-26. Preparation: B-ll and B-12. Systematic 
instruction is given in the most approved methods of machine shop practice, the 
object being to familiarize the student with the proper use of hand and machine 
tools, and the characteristics of the different materials worked. Particular atten- 
tion is given to the form, setting, grinding and tempering of tools and the mecha- 
nism of the different machines involving certain speeds, feeds, etc. The course is so 
planned that the instruction in each typical operation shall conform as nearly as 
possible to commercial machine-shop practice on textile machinery. The list of 




36 

tools which appears under “Equipment” in this Bulletin gives an idea of the scope 
of the work, which includes chipping and filing, tool grinding and tempering, straight 
and taper turning, screw cutting, drilling and boring, planer work, milling machine 
work, including gear cutting. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Applied Mechanics — B-30. Preparation: B-25. This is a continuation 
of Applied Mechanics B-25, and is given during the first term of the third year. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electrical Engineering — B-31. Preparation: B-23. The elementary prin- 
ciples of electricity and magnetism are considered in the lecture course on physics. 
Their development and application are taken up in this course in a detailed study 
of the magnetic and electric circuits during the first period of the first term. The 
second period is devoted to a study of the principles of direct current machinery. 
The laboratory work consists of a study of technical electrical measurements 
and dynamo-electric machinery, determining for the latter their operating charac- 
teristics. 

The second term is devoted entirely to a study of the principles of alternating 
current circuits, including vector representation, effective values, power, series 
and parallel circuits. The laboratory work consists of a study of technical electrical 
measurements, some meter calibration including that of watt-hour meters and a 
study of alternating current circuits using electrical measuring instruments. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electricity — B-31a. Preparation: B-23a. This is a short course given in 
the third year of the manufacturing courses, and consists of thirty lectures covering 
briefly and in a general way the theory of direct and alternating current generators 
and motors. [Courses I, II.] 

Heat Engineering — B-32. Preparation: B-12, B-20. The purpose of this 
course is to familiarize the student with the principles of elementary thermodyna- 
mics, the properties of steam, mechanical mixtures and combustion of fuels. The 
course consists of thirty exercises given in the first term of the third year. The 
lectures and recitations are supplemented with illustrative problems assigned for 
home preparation. 

Laboratory. The principles underlying the subjects of steam engineering, 
hydraulics and thermodynamics are demonstrated in a practical manner in the 
work in the Engineering Laboratory, given three hours per week. Greater im- 
portance is attached to the development of initiative and responsibility in the 
student than the mere accomplishment of a large number of carefully planned 
tests. The character of this work is indicated by the following list of experi- 
ments and tests: — 

Calibration of scales, tanks, gauges, inductors and counters; barrel, separating 
and throttling calorimeter tests; heat exchange tests; boiler inspection and meas- 
urement; flue gas analysis; dynamometer tests; ejector and injector tests; Ran- 
kin's efficiency, actual thermal efficiency and duty tests; expansion of pipes, 
radiation and pipe covering tests; boiler test; trap tests, feed water heating tests; 
steam, triplex and centrifugal pump tests. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Heat Engineering — B-33. Preparation: B-32. This course is a continua- 
tion of B-32, and consists of forty-five hours of lectures and recitations given in the 
second term of the third year of the Textile Engineering course. The subjects 
developed are the kinematics of reciprocating steam engines, steam turbines and 
gas engines. Special attention is given to the mechanical principles on which the 
steam engine operates, with detail discussion of the valve gear and governing 
devices, and the various diagrams used for studying the same. Consideration is 
given to the underlying heat theory and to the details of construction of the various 
parts of the machines. During the latter part of the course the historical develop- 
ment, classification and types of turbines and gas engines are discussed. 

Laboratory. The character of the work in the Engineering Laboratory, given 
three hours per week during the second half of the third year, is indicated by the 
following list of experiments: — 

# Boiler inspection and measurement ; Rankin's efficiency, actual thermal effi- 
ciency and duty tests; boiler test; valve setting by measurement and by indi- 
cator; condenser tests; non-condensing and condensing engine and turbine tests; 


3? 

heating and ventilating fan tests; lap and butt riveted joint test; nozzle test; gas 
• engine test; flow of air and air compressor tests. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-34. Preparation: B-21, B-25. Mill Engineering, 
as presented in thirty lectures during the third year of the Textile Engineering 
course, consists of a discussion of the following topics: the selection of a site for 
a manufacturing plant; the investigation of the subsoils for the footing course of 
the foundation; wood; concrete and sheet steel piling; design of walls, beams, 
floors, windows, doors, stairways and roofs. 

Sixty hours of drawing-room and laboratory practice are devoted to plane sur- 
veying, contour plotting, cut and fill calculations, setting of batter boards, align- 
ments of shafting and the study from blue-prints of slow-burning construction. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-34a. Preparation: B-21. Mill Engineering, as 
presented in thirty lectures during the third year of the diploma courses, is largely 
general in its nature and includes only parts of Course B-34. [Courses I, II.] 

Principles of Marketing — B-35. An introduction to the basic principles 
underlying the modern systems of distributing goods wdth special emphasis on 
the raw and finished products of the textile industry. The course will cover the 
history and economic importance and functions in modern distribution of the 
selling agent, the commission man, the broker, jobber, merchant, factor and other 
intermediaries as well as the channels that goods may take from the producer to 
the ultimate consumer. The importance and advantages of each will be studied 
with special emphasis on the present practice and trends in the textile industry. 

Lectures and the case method of instruction will be employed. [Course VI, Sales 
Option.] 

Marketing Methods — B-36. Preparation: B-35. A continuation of the 
Principles of Marketing. The course will be conducted by means of lectures and 
case problems and discussions. Some of the subjects studied in detail are,— the 
planning of marketing campaigns, the fluctuations of price and style, forecasting, 
the business cycle, quotas, market surveys and research, sales planning and con- 
trol, industrial marketing, and consumer merchandising. 

Considerable time will be devoted to the study of current literature and events 
in the textile field. [Course VI, Sales Option.] 

Textile Physics — B-37. Preparation: B-23. The work in this subject con- 
sists of experimental determinations of the physical properties of textile fibers, 
yarns and fabrics. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of properties which 
determine the color characteristics of textile materials. [Course VI, Design and 
Sales Options.] 

Accounting — B-40. Preparation: B-10 and E-30. The purpose of the 
course in accounting is to acquaint the student writh modern methods of accounting 
for mercantile and manufacturing businesses. At the same time it gives him a 
much-needed knowledge of such common elementary business transactions as are 
involved in the use of checks, drafts, notes, vouchers, bonds and stocks. 

It is not the purpose of the course to make the student a proficient bookkeeper 
or accountant, but the nature of the work necessitates a basic knowledge of double- 
entry bookkeeping and of the functions of ledger accounts. This is developed in 
practice in the following manner : During the summer preceding the fourth year the 
student is required to work up a simple bookkeeping set, thus saving valuable time 
during the school year and effectively preparing the ground for the instruction work. 

The course includes a study of the balance sheet and profit and loss statement, 
and their construction in proper form. _ Attention is given to the principles of 
balance sheet valuation, and to such topics as depreciation, sinking fund reserves 
and the accounting for bond and stock issues. 

One-half of the time scheduled for accounting is devoted to a study of Cost 
Accounting. It is designed to give the student a knowledge of the best cost methods 
in use at the present time, and involves a thorough discussion of methods of han- 
dling and accounting for raw materials, direct labor, the distribution of overhead 
expenses and the predetermination of costs. [Course VI.] 

Microscopy — B-41. Preparation: B-23. This subject consists of the study 
of animal and vegetable fibres by means of the microscope and its accessories. It 


38 

includes sectioning and mounting, measurements of diameter and twist, and the 
use of polarized light in the study and identification of fibers. [Course VI.] 
Textile Marketing — B-42. Preparation: E-30. This subject covers the 
problems of marketing textile products, with particular emphasis upon the ulti- 
mate consumer. The course will survey the principal marketing channels and 
marketing methods. Attention is directed to the possibilities of demand creation 
and demand control, especially through market and style research. Current 
changes in marketing organization of the industry will be studied and reviewed. 
[Courses IV and VI. Options G, C, W, D.] 

Textile Testing — B-43. Preparation: B-23, F-30 or G-30, D-32. This 
course is planned to familiarize the student with the latest methods and devices for 
determining the physical properties and characteristics of textile fibers, yarns and 
fabrics. The scope of the work is indicated by the following topics: abrasion, 
absorptability, atmospheric control, bursting, crimp, heat transmission, porosity, 
regain, resilience, stretch, tear, tensile strength, thickness, twist, waterproofness, 
precision of measurements, interpretation and presentation of data. These are 
treated both from the standpoint of commercial testing and of textile research. 
[Course VI.] 

Electrical Engineering — B-44. Preparation: B-31. During the first 
term a detailed study of the alternator is made, with particular stress on generation 
of three-phase currents. Methods of predetermination of alternator regulation 
are taken up and at least one method compared with laboratory test. Parallel 
operation of alternators with accompanying instruments and devices are studied in 
classroom and laboratory. The single phase, three-phase and Scott transformers 
are considered in turn and their various methods of connecting to line and alter- 
nators are systematically studied. 

In the second term the induction motor and generator are studied with their 
particular adaptability to the textile industry. The principal starting devices for 
this motor are thoroughly taken up. The synchronous motor is studied particularly 
in relation to its ability to correct power factor. In all the work outlined above, 
the main features are illustrated profusely in classroom demonstrations and labor- 
atory exercises. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-45. Preparation: B-34. This work, given in the 
fourth year of the Textile Engineering course, covers a wide range of subjects and 
is of the most practical character possible. All of the student’s previous work in 
engineering and his knowledge of the textile processes are here brought together in 
the consideration of the larger problems of mill design, construction and organiza- 
tion. After a detailed study has been made of the most modern types of mill 
buildings, including all calculations and drawings, the student is given the problem 
of laying out and completely designing a textile mill so far as time permits. 

The modern methods of power transmission and the proper arrangement of textile 
machinery are also given careful consideration. The problems are in every case 
taken from actual conditions in mills already built or in process of construction. 
The questions of mill heating, ventilation, lighting, humidification and fire protec- 
tion are also studied and the time spent in the drawing room enables the student to 
work out nearly all of the more important problems involved in the design of an 
entire textile mill plant. The close relation existing between proper plant design 
and economical production is also considered. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 
Business Administration— B-46. Preparation: B-10 and E-30. In recog- 
nition of the great advances which have been made recently towards better methods 
of management, and of the possibilities which may result from its application to 
the textile industry, a course in business administration has been established to 
enable the student to understand and apply the principles and details of modern 
management. The instruction in this course begins with a consideration of the 
factory location and design and their effect on efficiency of production, after which 
the proper form of organization for manufacturing establishments is discussed in 
detail, together with organization charts and records. 

This is followed by a study of the details of the work of the various departments, 
such as purchasing, manufacturing, planning, etc., and includes such topics as 
purchasing systems, storekeeping, perpetual inventories, warehousing, scheduling 
routing, tracing, timekeeping, motion studies, time studies, mnemonic symbolizing’ 


39 

graphical records, wage systems, etc. Consideration is also given to the important 
relation of psychology to efficient management. 

Business Law. Under this subject are given lectures, supplemented by the 
use of a suitable text, on the law governing contracts, negotiable instruments, 
sales, bills of lading, real estate and corporation. [Course VI.] 

Mill Illumination — B-47. Preparation: B-23. Because of the demand and 
the necessity for proper lighting of textile mills, this course is offered three hours 
per week for one term. It consists of three major parts, — photometry, illumina- 
tion and installation design. Costs and estimates, safety and production are 
included. 

The laboratory exercises include the study and applications of the photometer, 
Macbeth Illuminometer and foot-candle meter. The concluding work is a design 
of a lighting installation for a typical mill room, using the school laboratories for 
this purpose, [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electives — B-48. Students in the second term of the fourth year of the Textile 
Engineering course will be permitted to elect certain textile subjects as substitutes 
for part of the time scheduled for engineering subjects. Thus a student is offered 
an opportunity for specialized study along such lines as will prove most beneficial 
to him at that time. The selection of elective studies is subject to the approval 
of the head of the Textile Engineering department and to the possibility of arrang- 
ing for the same. [Course VI, Option G.] 

Principles of Selling and Advertising — B-49. Preparation: B-36. A 
comprehensive course dealing with the fundamental principles of advertising and 
selling. The course will cover the psychology of selling and advertising, the legal 
restrictions in marketing, advertising technique, copy writing, layout, illustrations, 
advertising campaigns, packaging, advertising mediums, industrial and consumer 
advertising, creative salesmanship, personality, types of customers, the selling 
process, supersalesmanship, etc. 

Lectures and the case method of instruction will be used. [Course VI, Sales 
Option.] 

Textile Styling — B-50. Preparation: B-37, D-30. This course will cor- 
relate the technical knowledge of design, acquired previously, to the fluctuations 
of style design, the creation of fads and the forecasting and planning of styles. 
[Course VI, Options D, S.] 

Foreign Trade and Economic Geography — B-51. Preparation: E-30. 

The course will cover the foreign markets for finished textiles and the American 
raw fibers, methods of selling employed, foreign commercial law that an American 
exporter needs, the foreign fibers and textiles and their importance in international 
trade. 

Special emphasis will be given upon costs of foreign marketing, tariffs, inter- 
national competition, possible markets and methods of building an export business. 
[Course VI, Sales Option.] 

Selling Policies — B-52. Preparation: B-49. This course will cover the 
development of administrative policies and guiding principles in the marketing, 
pricing, styling and merchandising of textiles and textile fibers. [Course VI, 
Sales Option.] 

Statistics — B-53. Preparation: B-20. A study of elementary statistics 
which relate to industry, trade and general business and financial conditions. It 
includes the analysis, presentation and interpretation of statistical data, index 
numbers, correlation, law of error, cyclical fluctuations, dispersion, trend and other 
pertinent topics. [Course VI, Sales Option.] 

CHEMISTRY AND DYEING DEPARTMENT— G 

Elementary Chemistry (Inorganic and Organic Chemistry) — C-10. 
Preparation : Admission Requirements. Instruction in Inorganic Chemistry 
extends through the first year, and includes lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work. The subject of Organic Chemistry is covered by lectures during the second 
term. 

Elementary Inorganic Chemistry 

Non-Metallic Elements. — Their occurence, properties, preparation, chemi- 
cal compounds, etc. 


40 

Metallic Elements. — Their occurrence, properties, metallurgy, chemical com- 
pounds, etc. 

Theoretical Chemistry. — Fundamental laws and the theories of chemistry 
including chemical action, chemical combination, combining weights, atomic 
weights, chemical equations, acids, bases, salts, Avogadro’s law, molecular weights, 
formulae, valence, periodic law, etc. 

During the first term of the first year, the class work in this course consists of 
three lectures, and one recitation per week on fundamental principles, and de- 
scriptive chemistry of the non-metallic elements and their compounds. This is 
accompanied by one afternoon per week of laboratory work, which may be on 
either inorganic preparations or qualitative analysis, according to the previous 
laboratory training of the individual student. 

In the second term, one lecture and one recitation per week are devoted to 
the metals and their compounds, and the laboratory periods wholly to quali- 
tative analysis, listed below as C-ll. 

Elementary Organic Chemistry 

This course includes a general survey of the fundamental principles of Organic 
Chemistry, also a study of the hydrocarbons and their derivatives from the point 
of view of their structure, preparation and uses. This work, although elementary 
in character, is of sufficient breadth to prepare the student understanding^ for 
the general lectures upon coal tar dyestuffs which are given in Course C-20. 
[All courses.] 

Qualitative Analysis — C-ll. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. 

This is a continuation of the laboratory study of inorganic compounds, with 
application to their systematic analysis. It is given ten hours per week to chemists 
during the second term of the first year. Students with adequate preparation 
can make further progress by starting this work in place of elementary laboratory 
exercises during the first term, as indicated under C-10. 

When sufficiently advanced, students take up the examination of various products 
with which the textile chemist must be familiar such as testing mordanted cloths, 
pigments and the various dyeing reagents. [Course IV.] 

Qualitative Analysis — C-lla. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. 
This course is similar to C-ll, but not so extensive, being given three hours per 
week during the second term. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Stoichiometry — C-12. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. Two 
hours per week during the second term of the first year, on the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying calculations of quantitative analysis, on the gas laws, and on 
balancing of chemical equations. [Course IV.] 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-20. Preparation: C-10, B-12, B-14. 
The outline of the lecture course which is given during the second year is as 
follows : — 

Technology of Vegetable Fibers. — Cotton, linen, jute, hemp, china grass. 
Chemical and physical properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, 
and their action with chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Animal Fibers. — Wool, mohair, silk. Chemical and physical 
properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, and their action with 
chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Artificial Fibers. — Study of the various forms of artificial 
silk, the process of manufacture, their properties and action with chemicals, acids 
and heat. 

Operations Preliminary to Dyeing. — Bleaching of cotton and linen; wool- 
scouring; bleaching, fulling and felting of wool; carbonizing; silk-scouring and 
bleaching; action of soap. 

The bleaching of cotton cloth, yarn and raw stock is studied at length with 
detailed description of the various forms of kiers and machinery used; also the 
action of the chemicals used upon the material, and the various precautions that 
must be taken in order to insure successful work. 

Under this heading is also included an exhaustive study of the reagents used in 
the emulsive wool-scouring process, and their action upon the fiber under various 
conditions; also the most successful of the solvent methods for degreasing wool. 


41 

Water and its Application in the Textile Industry. — Impurities present, 
methods for detection, their effect during the different operations of bleaching, 
scouring, dyeing and printing and the methods used for their removal or correction. 

The important subject of boiler waters is also studied under this heading, with 
a full discussion of the formation of boiler scale, its disastrous results, and the 
methods by which it may be prevented. 

Mordants and Other Chemical Compounds Used in Textile Coloring 
and Classified as Dyestuffs. — Theory of mordants, their chemical properties 
and application, aluminum mordants, iron mordants, tin mordants, chromium 
mordants, organic mordants, tannin materials, soluble oil, fixing agents, leveling 
agents, assistants, and numerous other compounds, not dyestuffs, that are ex- 
tensively used in the textile industry. 

Under this heading are included the definitions of various terms and classes 
of compounds used by textile colorists, such as color lakes, pigments, fixing 
agents, developing agents, mordanting assistants, mordanting principles and 
leveling agents. 

Theory of Dyeing. — A discussion of the chemical, mechanical, solution and 
absorption theories, and the various views that have been advanced by different 
investigators of the chemistry and physics of textile coloring processes. 

Under this heading are discussed the general methods of classifying dyestuffs 
and the definitions of such terms as textile coloring, dyeing, textile printing, sub- 
stantive and adjective dyestuffs, monogenetic and polygenetic dyestuffs. 

Natural Organic Coloring Matters. — Properties and application of indigo, 
logwood, catechu or cutch, Brazil wood, ‘cochineal, fustic, turmeric, madder, 
quercitron bark, Persian berries, and other natural dyestuffs that have been used 
within recent years by textile colorists. 

Mineral Coloring Matters. — Under this heading are discussed the proper- 
ties of such inorganic coloring matters and pigments as chrome yellow, orange 
and green, Prussian blue, manganese brown and iron buff. 

Artificial Coloring Matters. — General discussion of their history, nature, 
source, methods of manufacture, methods of classification and their application 
to all fibers. 

Special study of basic coloring matters, phthalic anhydride colors, including the 
eosins and phloxines; acid dyestuffs, Janus, direct cotton, sulphur and mordant 
colors, including the alizarines and other artificial coloring matter requiring me- 
tallic mordants; mordant acid and insoluble azo colors, developed on the fiber; 
reduction vat colors, aniline black and other artificial dyestuffs not coming under 
the above heads. 

As each class of dyestuffs is taken up, the details of the methods of applying 
them upon all the different classes of fabrics and in all the different forms of 
dyeing machines are thoroughly discussed; also the difficulties which may arise 
in their application, and the methods adopted for overcoming them. 

Machinery Used in Dyeing. — A certain amount of time is devoted to the 
description of the machinery used in various processes of textile coloring which 
is supplemented as far as possible by the use of charts, diagrams and lantern 
slides. 

Most of the important types of dyeing machines are installed within the dye- 
house of the school, and the students can be taken directly from the lecture room 
and shown the machines in actual operation. [All courses.] 

Dyeing Laboratory — C-21. Preparation: C-20 taken simultaneously. 
Besides lectures and recitations upon the subject of Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, 
practical laboratory work is required. By the' performance of careful and syste- 
matic experiments the student learns the nature of the various classes of dyestuffs 
and their coloring properties, their action under various circumstances, and the 
conditions under which they give the best results. The more representative dye- 
stuffs of each class are applied to cotton, wool, silk and the various types of rayon, 
and each student is obliged to enter, in an especially arranged sample book, a 
specimen of each of his dye trials with full particulars as to the conditions of ex- 
periment, percentage of compounds used, time, temperature of dye bath, etc. 

For convenience and economy most of the dye trials are made upon small skeins 
or swatches of the required materials, but from time to time students are required 


42 

to dye larger quantities in the full-sized dyeing machines which are described 
elsewhere. 

By the use of a small printing machine the principles of calico printing are illus- 
trated, and by means of the full-sized dyeing machines and vats the practical side 
of the subject is studied. It is the constant endeavor of those in charge to impart 
information of a theoretical and scientific character that will be of value in the 
operation of a dyehouse. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Organic Chemistry — C-22. Preparation: C-10. In this course, 
which consists of lectures and recitations, the principles of organic substitution 
and synthesis are thoroughly discussed and as many illustrations are used as time 
will permit, particularly such as are applied in the arts. The aliphatic series of 
hydrocarbons and their derivatives are studied for about twenty weeks, the re- 
mainder of the time being devoted to the benzine series. The aim of the course 
is to lay a broad foundation for the study of the chemistry of the artificial dye- 
stuffs. Students are required to work out problems in the synthesis of various 
compounds, in order to become familiarized with equation writing. [Course IV.] 

Quantitative Analysis — C-23. Preparation: C-ll. The object of this 
course is to teach the fundamental principles of quantitative analysis, and to 
give the student an opportunity of acquiring skill in manipulating the special 
apparatus used in analytical procedure. 

Typical gravimetric methods are taught the first term. The samples analyzed 
comprise salts, minerals and ores. Electrochemical analysis is carried out with 
the aid of a modern type of apparatus designed for rapid work. 

The work of the second term consists of volumetric methods. A number of ores 
and commercial products, carefully chosen, are analyzed so as to give the student 
a varied experience. 

The laboratory work is supplemented by lectures and recitations. Smith's 
“Quantitative Chemical Analysis" is used as a text. [Course IV.] 

Stoichiometry — C-24. Preparation: B-10, C-10, C-12. This subject is 
taken one hour a week during the second year. Calculations of gravimetric 
analysis are studied the first term, and calculations of volumetric analysis the 
second term. Hamilton and Simpson’s Calculations of Quantitative Chemical 
Analysis is used as a text. [Course IV.] 

Quantitative Analysis — C-30. Preparation: C-23. The fundamental 
principles acquired in Course C-23 are applied in this course in the examination of 
materials used in the textile mill, the dyehouse, and the finishing plant. Among 
the materials analyzed are water, soaps, oils, textile fabrics, stripping agents, 
acids and alkalies. The latest and most practical methods are employed. Griffin’s 
“Methods of Technical Analysis" is used as a text. [Course IV.] 

Industrial Chemistry (Lecture) — G-31. Preparation: C-22. During the 
second term of the third year lectures and recitations are held in industrial chem- 
istry, the course in general following Read’s “Industrial Chemistry." Particular 
attention is paid to those subjects which are of special interest to the textile chemist, 
as oils, soaps, gas and coal-tar industry, building materials, and the manufacture 
on a large scale of important chemical compounds, such as the common acids 
and alkalies, bleaching powders, various mordants, etc. The course is illustrated 
as far as possible with specimens, diagrams, and charts, and the students are 
given an opportunity to visit some of the industrial establishments in the vicinity 
of Lowell and Boston. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-32. Preparation: C-20, 
C-21. This is a continuation of the Textile Chemistry and Dyeing course of the 
second year, and includes a review of the second year’s work in this subject, with 
the introduction of many advanced considerations, and in addition, the following 
subjects: — 

Color Matching and Color Combining. — A study of that portion of physics 
which deals with color and the many color phenomena of interest to the textile 
colorist. The lecture work is supplemented with the practical application of the 
spectroscope and tintometer, and much practice in the matching of dyed samples 
of textile material. 

The primary colors both of the scientist and textile colorist, the results of com- 
bining coloring lights and pigments, and such subjects as color perception, color 


43 

contrast, purity of color, luminosity, hue, color blindness, dichroism, fluorescence 
and the effect of different kinds upon dyed fabrics, are discussed under this 
heading. 

Each student’s eyes are tested for color blindness early in the course, in order 
that he may be given an opportunity to change his course if his eyes should 
prove defective enough to interfere with his work as a textile colorist. 

A dark room has been provided where various experiments in color work and 
color matching may be performed. 

Dye Testing. — This subject includes the testing of several dyestuffs of each 
class, subjecting them to the common, color-destroying agencies; the determining 
of their characteristic properties, and their action towards the different fibers; 
also the determining of the actual money value and coloring power of dyestuffs 
in terms of a known standard. 

Each student is required to make a record of each color tested upon an espe- 
cially prepared card, which furnishes a permanent record of all dyestuffs, their 
dyeing properties, fastness to light and weather, washing, soaping, fulling, per- 
spiration, bleaching, steaming, ironing, rubbing, acids and alkalies. 

Union Dyeing. — A study of the principles involved in the dyeing of cotton 
and wool, cotton and silk, and silk and wool union materials in the production of 
solid and two-color effects. 

Textile Printing. — A thorough study of the whole subject of textile printing, 
each student being required to produce individually no less than twenty different 
prints, including the following styles; pigment style, direct printing style, steam 
style with tannin mordant, steam style with metallic mordant, madder or dyed 
style, the ingrain or developed azo style, discharge dye style, discharge mor- 
danted style, resist style, indigo printing, aniline black printing. 

The different parts of the calico printing machine are thoroughly studied; also 
the precautions which must be considered in its use, and the arrangement of the 
dyeing apparatus which must accompany such a machine. 

Special attention is paid to the methods of mixing and preparing the various 
color printing pastes that are used in the above work upon a manufacturing scale 
as well as experimentally in the laboratory. 

Cotton Finishing. — A study of the various processes of finishing cotton 
cloth and the different materials used therein. The work involves the discussion 
of the various objects of cotton finishing and such operations as pasting, damp- 
ing, calendering, stretching, stiffening, mercerizing, beetling and filling, and the 
various machines used for carrying out these processes. 

Mill Visits. — During the third and fourth years visits are made to some of 
the large dyehouses, bleacheries and print works in the vicinity. [Course IV.] 

Physical Chemistry — C-33. Preparation: B-10, C-10, C-12. During 
the third year, three hours per week of lectures and recitations are given on the 
application of the experimental methods and calculations of physics to chemical 
phenomena. Students passing this course may supplement it by the optional 
laboratory course C-42 in the fourth year. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Organic Chemistry — C-34. Preparation: C-22. This is a con- 
tinuation of Advanced Organic Chemistry C-22. [Course IV.] 

Technical German — C-35. Preparation: C-20, C-22, E-21. This course 
consists of the reading of German technical literature with the object of familiariz- 
ing the student with the current German publications in textile chemistry and 
coloring. [Course IV.] 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory — C-36. Preparation: C-20, C-22, C-23. 

This course, while including practice in the usual methods of organic analysis, and 
giving excellent training in the principles and manipulations of general organic 
synthesis, is especially devoted to the synthetic dyestuffs. The student not only 
prepares many of the representative dyestuffs, but, what is far more important, 
he carries out all the operations, beginning with coal tar itself. Thus, instead of 
merely coupling two or more of the foreign imported intermediate products to 
make a dyestuff, he starts with the basic substances obtained from the coal tar 
and makes his own intermediate products. As far as is possible the student will 
be made acquainted with the problems which might arise in a dyestuff factory, 
and an excellent opportunity is presented for original work. [Course IV.] 


44 

Photography — C-37. Preparation: B-23, C-20, C-22, C-23. Photography 
is today indispensable to the scientist and textile chemist. Without the aid of 
photography he cannot preserve and keep an absolute and accurate record of his 
investigations and research problems. 

The Institute therefore offers to the Senior Chemists an eight-weeks' course in the 
elements of Photography. One object of this course is to provide the student with 
the preliminary knowledge and training necessary for the course in Microscopy and 
Photomicrography which follows. 

The course includes a study of the different types of cameras and lenses, the 
making of contact prints from classified negatives using various grades of papers, 
reduction and intensification of negatives, enlarging, copying, negative making 
and lantern slide preparation. 

The theory and chemistry of the above subjects are not only covered in the 
classroom but in addition all of this work is actually carried on by each individual 
student in the Photographic Laboratory and Dark Room. [Course IV.] 

Technical German — C-40. Preparation: C-35. This is a continuation of 
Technical German C-35. [Course IV.] 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory — C-41. Preparation: C-34. This is a 
continuation of Organic Chemistry Laboratory 034. [Course IV.] 

Industrial Chemistry — 042. Preparation: C-31. This is a continuation 
of Industrial Chemistry C-31. [Course IV.] 

Chemical Textile Testing — C-43. Preparation: C-21, C-32. A series of 
lecture and laboratory periods covering the theory and use of the instruments and 
apparatus used in testing and evaluating textile materials. Emphasis is given to 
those tests which may be used to give a chemist valuable information as to the 
source and quality of textiles. The last part of the work consists of chemical and 
optical tests which may be necessary to a textile chemist in either routine or re- 
search work. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-44. Preparation: C-32. 

This is a continuation of the third-year work in Advanced Textile Chemistry and 
Dyeing, and includes the following subjects: — 

Classification and Molecular Structure of Artificial Dyestuffs. — A 
study from a more advanced standpoint of the classification and constitution of 
artificial dyestuffs including the various methods used in their production, also 
the orientation of the various groups which are characteristic of these compounds 
and their effect on the tinctorial power of dyestuffs. 

The object of this study is to give the student a more complete knowledge of 
the artificial dyestuffs from the color manufacturer’s point of view, which will 
prove of particular value to those who intend later to enter the employ of dye- 
stuff manufacturers or dealers. 

Economics of the Dyeing, Bleaching and Finishing Industries. — A study 
of the factors to be considered in the establishment of a dyeing, bleaching and 
finishing plant together with the most essential considerations of its management. 

Advanced Dyeing Conference. — During the latter part of his course each 
student will be required to write, for presentation before the other members of 
his class, a paper upon some assigned subject of general interest. After presenta- 
tion the subject will be open to discussion and question. 

The object of this conference is twofold. First, to give the student experience 
and practice in systematically looking up an assigned subject and presenting it 
before others; and secondly, to bring before the class a greater variety of sub- 
jects with more detail than could be covered by the general lectures of the 
course. [Course IV.] 

Microscopy and Photomicroscopy — C-45. Preparation: B-23, C-20, 
C-22, C-37. The value of the microscope in the identification of textile materials 
and the examination of textile yarns and fabrics cannot be overestimated. In con- 
junction with photomicroscopy a permanent record which may be filed for future 
reference and which is understandable by non-technical men is obtained. 

In this course the students are given instruction in the use and construction of 
various types of microscopes and accessories; the preparation and mounting of 
samples; the identification of starches and fibers; microchemical reactions; and 


45 

examination of fabrics for faults. Actual unknown fibers, starches and fabrics are 
examined and reported upon. 

Following microscopy, the student takes up photomicroscopy, for which he has 
been prepared by a thorough course in the common processes of photography. The 
types and constructions of photomicrographic apparatus, adjustments, and ex- 
posures are taught by actual work in the photomicrographic laboratory. The 
student studies the use of such auxiliaries as color filters, polarized light, dark- 
ground illumination, color photography, and works at both high and low magnifica- 
tions. At the end of the course the student is given a typical industrial or research 
problem on which he works independently and upon which he must prepare a 
complete report, illustrated by appropriate photomicrographs. [Course IV.] 
Quantitative Analysis — C-46. Preparation: C-30. This course consists 
of lectures, recitations and quizzes on the fundamental principles of analytical 
chemistry. [Course IV.] 

Report Writing — C-47. Preparation: B-20a, E-20. The purpose of this 
course is to enable the student to write a technical report clearly. An analysis of a 
complete research is first made. This is followed by a bibliography and instructions 
in the use of reference books and technical journals. Methods of obtaining and 
interpreting laboratory data are given and the elements of statistical analysis 
demonstrated and used. Instruction and illustrations of various technical and non- 
technical, formal and informal, laboratory and plant reports are given. [Course IV.] 
Textile Literature — C-48. Preparation : C-47. The object of this course is 
to introduce the student to the current sources of information on textile chemical 
subjects. Each student is assigned a subject and is required to keep informed on 
that subject by first a survey of the literature and then the reading of current 
technical journals. Reports are tendered informally and orally. [Course IV.] 
Advanced General Chemistry — C-49. Preparation: C-10, C-ll, C-24, 
C-34, C-42, C-46. The object of this course is more to correlate the various 
branches of chemistry studied in the previous three and one-half years than to 
introduce new material. An attempt is made to show the essential oneness of all 
chemical knowledge. Recent theories are discussed briefly. [Course IV.] 
Engineering Chemistry — C-50. Preparation: C-22, C-23. This course 
consists of a series of lectures covering the derivation, sampling, analysis, and 
specification of coals, gasolines, kerosenes, fuel gases, flue gases, oils, greases, and 
boiler waters. This is followed by a study of combustion and the underlying 
principles of lubrication. The lectures are supplemented by laboratory work con- 
sisting of complete analyses of coal, gasoline, oil, grease, flue gas, and illuminating 
gas. [Course IV.] 

The Chemistry of Rayon, Its Manufacture, Bleaching, Dyeing and 
Finishing — C-51. Preparation : C-32. During the past five years the develop- 
ments of the bleaching, dyeing and finishing of rayon have been systematically 
studied and the curriculum of the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course has been 
revised from time to time to cover the latest developments in regard to these 
fibers. A complete unit for the actual manufacture of rayon is available for experi- 
mental and demonstration purposes, and the course includes laboratory practice 
in the manufacture of viscose rayon. 

Many of the difficulties which arose during the early days of the artificial silk 
industry were due to lack of knowledge of its properties and more or less persistent 
attempts to handle it in just the same manner as real silk. As soon as the textile 
manufacturer began to fully appreciate the fact that the various rayons were 
entirely different fibers from true silk and consequently must be handled by dif- 
ferent methods, then many extensive improvements were made in the processes 
of manufacturing textiles containing these fibers. In order to satisfactorily handle 
the different rayons they must receive a preliminary treatment with various oils 
and softeners, and as a result the problem of establishing the specifications for the 
best type of oil to use for this purpose and also the best methods of removing it 
from the material during the finishing process have been important problems in 
the development of the industry, and these among others are being studied in the 
Lowell Textile Institute at the present time. [Course IV.] 

Optional Subjects or Thesis during fourth year — C-52. Preparation: 
Satisfactory completion of all first and second year subjects in Course IV. 


46 

The value of undergraduate thesis work for all students has frequently been ques- 
tioned. There is no doubt that many senior students might take optional work of 
an advanced nature to greater advantage than devoting the same amount of time 
to specific thesis work. With this in mind beginning 1931-32 several options were 
introduced, each optional period being 45 hours per term and four of these being 
required during the year. 

If a student has indicated through the first three years of his work that he is 
capable of handling an original investigation, a definite thesis subject may be 
assigned to him which will require the entire 180 hours. At the discretion of the 
Head of the Department, thesis subjects involving one or more option periods 
may also be assigned. 

In all cases, ' however, 180 hours' work of an advanced nature, either of thesis 
work or optional subjects, will be required for graduation. 

Options: Textile Chemistry Laboratory. A laboratory course on some 
branch of textile chemistry varying from year to year. 

Photomicroscopy. A series of laboratory experiments followed by a research 
problem in photomicroscopy. Effects of the optical system, exposure, polarized 
light and dark ground illumination are studied and color photomicroscopy is 
included as far as time permits. 

Colloid Chemistry. A seminar course on general colloid chemistry with spe- 
cial applications to textiles. The colloid chemistry of dyeing, the action of 
detergents, and the swelling effects of various materials on the fibers are espe- 
cially emphasized. 

Microbiology I. This course gives a general survey of the effect of the vari- 
ous micro-organisms on textile materials. Consideration is given to the methods 
of studying molds and bacteria and the methods of preventing their growth on 
textiles. In the laboratory the isolation, identification and properties of the 
organisms are studied. The detection of micro-organisms on fibers and damage 
to fibers caused by their growth is studied in detail. Methods of testing anti- 
septics to be used on textiles are also studied. 

Microbiology II. A continuation of Microbiology I, laying special emphasis 
on the branch of microbiology in which the student is most interested. No lec- 
tures are given but each student is required to do certain reading and frequent 
conferences are held with the instructor. In the laboratory each student selects 
some problem and works it out as thoroughly as time permits. 

Rayon. Advanced study of rayon dyeing. 

Physical Chemistry. Measurement of molecular weights, heats of reaction, 
vapor pressure, surface tension, hydrogen ion concentration, electrical conduc- 
tivity, etc. 

Advanced Preparative Chemistry. The student is required to carry through 
certain preparations starting with a weighed minimum and handing in a weighed 
product. The preparations are so chosen as to review the principles of inorganic 
chemistry and at the same time develop the student's laboratory technique. By 
basing the grade on quantity as well as quality of product obtained, careful 
technique is encouraged. Conferences and quizzes are given before and after 
each preparation. The student is constantly required to apply the principles of 
previous lecture courses in analytical, inorganic and physical chemistry. 

TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING DEPARTMENT— D 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis — D-10. During the first year instruction 
is given in the subject of classification of fabrics, use of point or design paper, plain 
fabrics, intersection, twills and their derivation, sateen, basket and rib weaves, 
checks, and stripes, fancy weaves, including figured and colored effects; producing 
chain and draw from design, and vice versa ; extending and extracting weaves. 

This subject takes up in a systematic manner the analysis of samples illustrating 
the various cloth constructions for the purpose of determining the design of the 
weave and the amount and kind of yarns used, and forms the basis of calculation 
in the cost of reproducing any style of goods. The various topics discussed are 
reeds and setts; relation and determination of counts of cotton, woolen, worsted, 
silk and yarns made from the great variety of vegetable fibers; grading of yarns, 
folded, ply, novelty and fancy yarns; application of the metric system to yarn cal- 


47 

culation; problems involving take-up, average counts, determination of counts of 
yarn, and weight of yarn required to produce a given fabric. [First term, all 
courses.] [Second term, Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-20. For Cotton Goods — Prep- 
aration: D-10. During the second year consideration is given to fancy and 
reverse twills, diaper work, damasks, skip weaves, sateen fabrics with plain ground, 
backed fabrics, and multiple ply fabrics. Students are required to make original 
designs and put the same into the loom. Special attention is given to the con- 
sideration of color effect. 

During the first term free-hand drawing is taught by means of plates, and prac- 
tice in coloring is given in conjunction with this work. 

Practice in lettering, spacing and general arrangement of designs and sketches 
is given. The engineering alphabet is used in all work. 

During the second term instruction is given in drawing, sketching, coloring and 
designing, with reference to their application in textiles. Good examples of applied 
design in textiles, as well as in other branches, are used as a basis for modified 
designs selected and composed by the student. This stimulates originality as well 
as teaches the student to appreciate good designs and color. 

The analysis of these fabrics forms a part of the course in design. This also 
includes the necessary calculations required to reproduce the fabric or to construct 
fabrics of similar character. [Courses I, III, VI, Options C, D, S.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-21 . For Woolen and Worsted 
Goods — Preparation: D-10. During the second year the instruction given 
includes warp and filling backed cloth, figured effects produced by extra warp and 
filling, double cloths, multiple ply fabrics, cotton warps, blankets, bathrobes, 
crepes, filling reversible, Bedford cords, imitation furs, crepons, matelasse and 
imitations, double plain, ingrains, velvets, corduroys, overcoatings, trouserings. 

The analysis of these fabrics, together with the consideration of the shrinkages 
and dead loss in all fabrics, theory of diameter of yarns, and costs of blends and 
mixes is a part of this course. [Courses II, III, VI, W, D, S.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-22. Preparation: D-10. 
This is a short course covering the elementary principles of designing in general. 
Instruction is given in the theory of shrinkages and the lay-out of woolen and 
worsted fabrics, and at the same time similar instruction is given in the design and 
construction of cotton fabrics. [Course VI, General Option.] 

Jacquard Design — D-23. Preparation: D-10. This course, given during 
the second term, covers detail instruction of the Jacquard machine and the various 
tie-ups in common use, the layout for different kinds of fabrics, and the cutting of 
cards in accordance with prepared designs. The adaptation of various designs to 
woven fabrics through the aid of cross section paper and its correlation with the 
different types of looms and Jacquard machines are thoroughly covered. The 
student is encouraged in original designs and such of these as meet approval are 
carried out in woven goods. [Course III.] 

Power Weaving — D-24. Preparation: D-10. In connection with the work 
in Textile Design and Cloth Analysis practical work is carried on upon the power 
looms. This includes the preparation of warps, beaming, dressing, sizing, draw- 
ing-in and making of chains, the cutting and lacing of cards, spooling and quilling 
and the machinery for the same. A study is made of warpers and sizing machines, 
both for cotton and woolen. Lectures are given to correspond with the progress 
of the student in the Power Weaving Laboratory covering the following subjects: 
loom adjustments, chain building, shuttle changing looms, dobby looms, single and 
double acting dobbies, handkerchief motions, leno weaving, center selvedge motion, 
filhng changing looms, oscillating reeds, lappet motions, various shaker motions, 
towel and other pile cloth weaving, Jacquard looms, single and double lift leno 
Jacquards, Jacquards of special design, tying up Jacquard harness. [Courses I, 
II, III, VI.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-30. Preparation: D-20 or 
D-21. The advanced work takes up the more complicated weaves adapted to 
harness work, and leads into leno and Jacquard designs. The following is a brief 
list of the subject heads, which will give some idea of the course: double plain 
cloths, ingrains, tricots, chinchilla, tapestry, blankets, upholsteries, spot weaves, 


48 

pile or plush, crepon, matelasse and its imitations, pique, Marseilles, quilting, and 
miscellaneous designs for Jacquard, leno, fustian, tissue fabrics and lappets. 

Original designs and sketches for particular grades of goods and the study of 
color effects form an important part of the third-year course. It should be under- 
stood that work in decorative art is carried on in conjunction with textile con- 
struction and weaving, particularly on the Jacquard loom. Designs of merit are 
carefully developed in detail and woven into cloth. 

The work in cloth construction includes the application of the different weaves 
and their combinations in the productions of fancy designs, both modified and 
original; the calculation involved in the reproduction of standard fabrics changed 
to meet varying conditions of weight, stock, counts of yarn and value; and the 
discussion of the breaking strength of fabrics and relationship of the construction 
of the fabric to breaking strength. 

Instruction in this subject, which is given by classroom work, is intended to 
bring together the principles considered under the subject of design, cloth con- 
struction, weaving and yarn making of previous years, and to show the bearing each 
has in the successful construction of a fabric. [Courses III, VI, Options C, D, S.] 

Jacquard Design — D-31. This is a continuation of Jacquard Design D-23. 
[Course III.] 

Power Weaving — D-32. Preparation: D-20, D-21, or D-23. Instruction 
is given in weaving on fancy woolen and worsted looms, single and double acting 
dobbies, leno weaving, various shaker motions, lappet loom weaving, double and 
single lift Jacquard looms, tying up Jacquard harness, leno Jacquard, harness and 
box chain building; warp preparation for woolen and worsted and cotton; formulas 
for making up different kinds of sizing. Lectures are given to correspond with the 
same. [Courses I, II, III, VT.] 

Jacquard Design and Weaving — D-40. Preparation: D-23. Instruction 
bears particular stress on the sketching of original designs as applied to particular 
fabrics with reference to the more advanced forms of fabrics and warp tie-ups. In 
this work the student not only produces his own sketches but must carry his ideas 
through to the finished fabric. [Course VT, Options D, S.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-41. Preparation D-10, D-20, 
D-21. The work in this course is the application of the instruction received during 
the three years previous. Particular attention is given to the layout of designers’ 
blankets. Instruction in the production of new designs is given by the use of design 
suggestion sheets. As in the Jacquard work the student must not only lay out the 
blankets but must put them in the loom and work out the various effects for himself. 
[Course VI, Options D, S.] 

Decorative Art for Special Students. This course is planned to give a 
student a working knowledge and appreciation of design. The first and second 
years are devoted to a general study of design, color, perspective, lettering and 
rendering. Drawings are made in the historic styles for all materials, — wood, 
gold, silver, copper, brass, leather, fabrics, wall papers and glass. 

In the third year students should specialize and devote their attention to the 
material in which they expect to work. 

LANGUAGE AND HISTORY DEPARTMENT— E 

English — E-10. Preparation: Admission Requirements. A technically 
trained man should be able to express himself clearly, forcibly and fluently, as 
inability to do so will be a serious handicap to him in after life. The object of 
the English course is to develop the student’s power of expression by a thorough 
study of the principles of advanced rhetoric and composition, and by constant 
writing of themes illustrative of the four forms of discourse, viz., description, 
narration, exposition and argumentation. In addition to the study of rhetoric 
and composition and the writing of themes, several classics such as are not read 
in the preparatory schools are studied and discussed. [All courses.] 

Elementary German — E-ll. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
This course is intended for first-year students who do not offer German as an en- 
trance requirement and who desire to take the course in Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring. It may be selected by students taking the Textile Engineering course 
who have not fully met the entrance requirements in language. The work is ele- 


49 

mentary in character, and much time is devoted to the study of the rudiments of 
German grammar with practice in composition. During the latter part of the year 
considerable attention is given to the reading of ordinary German prose, which 
serves as an additional preparation to the student for the later reading of works 
along scientific and industrial lines. [Course IV.] 

English — E-20. Preparation: E-10. The curriculum of this course is based 
upon the sound belief that the young man about to enter business can profit much 
by the study of the principles and the rules of standard English as applied to busi- 
ness writing. The student is given a comprehensive remedial review of the funda- 
mentals of grammar in their relation to practical expression in writing letters and 
reports. Class discussions of actual quoted letters, collateral readings, and home 
preparation of written assignments afford the student abundant opportunity to 
enlarge his vocabulary and to improve his style. During the second semester, 
modern essays and other works of fiction are read and discussed. The course meets 
twice each week. [Course IV.] 

Advanced German — E-2I. Preparation: E-ll. For students taking the 
course in Chemistry and Textile Coloring the elementary course of the first year 
is continued throughout the second year. The work consists of the study of some 
of the more advanced principles of grammar, and especially of the reading of 
scientific German, dealing with a variety of subjects, and the translation of com- 
mercial German. [Course IV.] 

Economics — E-30. Preparation: E-10. This course, meeting three times 
a week, is conducted by means of lectures, discussions, and recitations, supple- 
mented by textbook reading and study of charts analyzing various phases of 
industrial problems. The character of the course is descriptive and practical 
rather than theoretical, and the aim is to acquaint the student with the accepted 
principles of economics and some of their applications to industrial conditions. 

The course will also deal briefly with economic history, showing how the present 
economic system has evolved from past systems and pointing out how the experi- 
ence of the past can aid in the solution of present problems. 

Besides the historical material, other topics discussed are the nature and scope 
of economics; the evolution of economic society; the three factors of production, 
land, labor and capital; the four elements in distribution, rent, wages, interest and 
profits; business organization; value and price; monopoly; money, credit and 
banking; international trade; protection and free trade; transportation; insur- 
ance; economic activities of municipalities; and public finance. In short, it is an 
outline course dealing with the fundamental principles that underlie a wide range 
of activities. [Courses IV, VI.] 

COTTON DEPARTMENT— F 

Cotton Carding — F-20. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-I4. This course ex- 
tends throughout the second year and includes instruction starting with the growth, 
classes and characteristics of cotton and^continues on through all the mill opera- 
tions preparatory to spinning. 

Cotton Production. — A study of the areas of the world producing cottons 
and the characteristics of the world’s commercial cottons forms the major por- 
tion of this division of the work. Particular emphasis is given to the various 
American cottons. The different methods of ginning and the by-products from 
the cotton seed are studied here. 

Cotton Marketing. — The customary methods of concentrating and distrib- 
uting raw cotton come under this heading, which includes a study of the handling 
of cotton for spot sales and through the exchanges. It includes also a study of 
the classing of cottons, which involves instruction regarding the Federal Stand- 
ards for classing and the terms commonly used by mills in handling purchases 
of cotton. 

Opening. — The various machines used in opening raw cotton are studied in 
considerable detail, following which, typical layouts of the various machines in 
series, as used by different mills, are taken as illustrations of how these machines 
can be arranged for various conditions. 

Picking. — Particular emphasis is used in instructing the student in the new 
arrangements being developed for the picker room. Such standard subjects as 


50 

eveners, lap measuring motions, grids and beaters are followed with illustrations 
of their application to the single process pickers. The effect of varying humidi- 
ties on proper lap weights and future results in the card room are clearly pointed 
out under this heading. Draft, production and waste calculations complete the 
instruction on pickers. 

Carding. — The process of carding is considered one of the most important, and 
proper time is devoted to the construction and operation of cards, that the stu- 
dent may be familiar with the various parts of the card and the function and 
design of each. The construction and application of card clothing, as well as the 
methods of grinding, form a part of the work. The proper procedure for oper- 
ating cards to get the proper size and production and to keep them in proper 
mechanical condition to produce good work occupy considerable of the time 
given to carding. The calculations for draft, production and percent of waste 
completely cover these subjects as connected with carding. 

Drawing. — Under this head is taken up the theory of doublings and their 
effect upon the quality of roving and yarn. Like previous and subsequent 
processes the machine construction forms an important part of the work. Proper 
stress is paid to such subjects as stop motions, drawing rolls and their covering, 
cleaners and evener motions. The calculations cover draft, production, roll crimp 
and improvement in uniformity. 

Combing. — This process is explained by lecture work and by operation and 
assembling of the various types of combs in service in the laboratory. The object 
of combing is fully considered, and the different means employed on the many 
types of combers on the market is studied. This includes such types as the 
Heilman, New Whitin and Nasmith combers. Considerable time is spent in 
studying the many comb adjustments, their purpose and how they should be 
used to produce the desired quality of work. The proper care of the comb is 
explained. The subject includes the necessary calculations for draft, noilage and 
production. 

Roving. — Under this heading the frames called the slubber, intermediate, fine 
and jack are studied. The numerous changes and adjustments necessary to pro- 
duce good work are stressed, with special emphasis on the less obvious subjects 
of lay and tension. Both English and American types of frames are used. The 
cotton system for sizing rovings and yarns is studied here, following which, such 
calculations as draft, twist, lay, tension and production complete the work of the 
roving operations. 

Laboratory. — An extensive series of laboratory projects are carried out simul- 
taneously with the lecture instruction. These laboratory classes illustrate the 
principles developed in the class room and extend the class room work to practi- 
cal application and operation. After work in classing raw cottons, cotton is 
processed using different adjustments, thus showing the results of the changes. 
Sufficient quantities of stock are processed so that the roving made is later spun 
into yarns and manufactured into cloth by the student. [Course I.] 

Cotton Carding — F-20a. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-14. This course is 
similar to Course F-20, except that there is much less time devoted to lecture and 
laboratory work. [Courses III, VI, Options G, C, D, S.] 

Cotton Spinning — F-30. Preparation: F-20. This course extends through- 
out the third year and includes instruction on spinning, spooling, winding, twisting, 
reeling and baling. 

Ring Spinning and Twisting. — This part of the course covers all kinds of 
ring spinning and twisting frames, their construction, principles of their actions 
and calculations. Particular emphasis is given to the production of yams for 
different uses, in order that the desirable characteristics may be obtained. As 
the twister so closely resembles the spinning frame in many ways, the two oper- 
ations are studied in succession to avoid duplication. The defects commonly 
found in yarns and methods of eliminating them require considerable attention. 
The methods of sizing yarns and the calculations for determining draft, twist 
and production are important factors in this work. 

Mule Spinning. — Although less common than formerly in American mills, the 
mule is still of sufficient importance to warrant a study of its major motions. 




51 

The advantages of mule yarns are clearly shown and the more common calcula- 
tions for draft, twist and production are given. 

Spooling and Winding. — These methods of preparing yarns for twisting and 
warping are fully explained. The machines are studied for the mechanical con- 
struction and adjustment. The calculations are largely in connection with pro- 
duction. 

Reeling and Baling. — This work covers the winding of yarns into skeins on 
various types of reels, the calculations for producing skeins of a desired size and 
the adjustment of stop motions for measuring the desired yardage. The pack- 
ing of skeins into bales follows the reeling. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work for this course consists of a series of proj- 
ects particularly intended to illustrate the important features of the various 
machines and their products. In addition, considerable time is spent in pro- 
ducing yarns in sufficient quantities to give the student some practical experi- 
ence in operating the machine and handling the rovings and yarns required. 
[Course I.] 

Cotton Spinning — F-30a. Preparation: F-20a. This course is similar 
to Course F-30 except that there is much less time devoted to laboratory work. 
[Courses III, VI, Options G, C, D, S.] 

Knitting — F-31. Preparation: B-12, D-10. This course, commencing with 
a study of hosiery yarns and their preparation for knitting, includes a study of the 
various stitches and their application in commercial fabrics ; a study of the different 
knitting machines, including circular and flat, spring and latch needle machines, 
used in the manufacture of stockings, sweaters and underwear; and a study of 
looping and sewing machines. Part of the work consists of the assembling and 
adjusting of different types of knitting machines. 

In addition, considerable time is spent in the analysis of knitted fabrics. [Courses 

I, II.] 

Knitting — F-31a. Preparation: B-12, D-10. This course embraces the 
same lectures as Course F-31 but does not include any laboratory work. [Course 
VI, Options G, C, W, SJ 

Cotton Organization — F-32. Preparation: F-20 or F-20a. This course 
correlates all the work in the Department of Cotton Yarns. The student is in- 
structed how cotton yarn mill organizations are made, by the study of actual mill 
organizations, showing the drafts, doublings and sizes in use. This is followed by 
the calculation of machinery necessary to equip a given plant and the arrangement 
of this machinery in the mill building. Some time is given to the study of special 
equipment not specifically covered in other classes. [Courses I, VI, Options G, C.] 

Thesis — F-34. Each student is required to present a thesis which is a report 
of some original work. This is sometimes the construction of some yarn or fabric 
to meet certain requirements. At other times the work is a study of some technical 
problem regarding the effect of certain changes in manufacturing conditions. 
[Course I.] 

WOOL DEPARTMENT— G 

Fiber Preparation — G-20. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-13. Raw Ma- 
terials. — A study of raw materials which enter into the manufacture of woolen 
or worsted yarns, or are made into yarns by processes similar to those employed 
in the manufacture of woolen and worsted yarns, would include silk, mohair, 
alpaca, vicuna, cashmere, earners hair, cotton, flax, hemp, jute and ramie. 

Wool Sorting. — Familiarity with the various grades and kinds of wool is 
obtained by lecture and by actual sorting of fleece wool under the direction of an 
experienced wool sorter. The various characteristics and properties are ex- 
plained, as are also trade names, such as picklock, XXX, XX, ^-blood, %-blood, 
%-blood, delaine, braid, etc. Some skill is acquired in the estimation of shrink- 
age and in judging the spinning qualities. 

Wool Scouring. — The object of scouring and the methods employed are ex- 
plained, and this involves the consideration of the soaps and chemicals used in 
washing; also the waste products and their utilization. Actual work is done in 
scouring a commercial quantity of wool by machines that are made similar in 
operation to regular commercial machines. A study is made of the effect of the 


52 

hardness of water upon soap; also tests are made to show this effect. At the 
same time the use of dryers, their operation and regulation, is taken up. 

Top Making and Combing. — This branch takes up in all detail the carding of 
wool on a worsted card, the preparing processes, back-washing and Vigoureaux 
printing, also gilling of the stock before and after combing. The construction of 
the gill boxes and combs is studied by lectures and by dismantling and assem- 
bling these machines in the laboratories. Later, quantities of stock are made 
into top and then into yarn. 

The Noble comb is studied, and the various calculations to determine draft, 
noiling, tear, productions, etc., are made. [Courses II, III, VI, Options G, W, 
D, S.] 

Woolen Yarn and Shoddy Manufacture — G-21. Preparation: B-10, 
B-12, B-13. Reworked Fiber or Shoddy. — Rags of all kinds are studied, sorted, 
and all processes necessary to convert them into fiber are covered in detail. 

Wool Blending, Oiling and Picking. — Mixing and shading of colors and 
qualities of wool are studied and practiced. The details of Burr Pickers and 
mixing pickers including the Fearnaught are studied in full. The importance of 
oils and emulsions is stressed in lecture and laboratory. 

Woolen Carding. — The system of carding wool for woolen yarn is fully ex- 
plained, as is also the construction, setting and operation of the cards. A part of 
the work is the reclothing and grinding of the cylinders, strippers, workers, etc. 
The carding of suitable and commercial quantities of wool, and the further 
manufacture of it into yarn, serves to fix the principles of carding in the mind 
of the student, as well as to give him some skill in handling machinery. 

Woolen Spinning. — The computations necessary in converting roping into 
yarn are fully explained. The details of construction and operation of the spring 
and cam type mule are well covered in lectures and practice. The theory and 
practice of continuous or ring spinning for woolen is also taken up. The con- 
ditioning of yarn after spinning by steaming is explained. 

Costs and details of a yarn mill are mentioned in brief as well as some causes 
of poor yarn and its effect on mill production. [Courses II, III, VI, Options G, 
W, D, S.] 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture — G-30. Preparation : G-20. Intersecting Gill 
Boxes and French Comb. — The equipment of the laboratory, offers opportunity 
for the production of dry-combed top and its comparison with oil-combed top 
produced on the Noble comb. The structures and uses of intersecting gill boxes 
and the study of combing and drawing blends is taken up at this point. 

Drawing and Spinning. — The laboratory equipment consisting of the Brad- 
ford (English) system of drawing, of both open and cone types, as well as the 
various processes of French drawing, followed by both worsted mule and ring 
spinning frame, make possible a thorough study of the manufacture of worsted 
yarn by all of the existing methods. 

The same method of study of mechanisms, calculations, and operations of the 
various machines is followed as in the case of previous methods of instruction. 
The student by pursuing this course can compare the different methods of yarn 
manufacture and note the results of each. 

Organization. — At the end of the course the layout of a properly balanced 
yarn mill is studied, and at the same time the cost of machinery, depreciation, 
labor costs and machinery arrangements. 

Thesis. — Before graduation the student must present visible evidence of his 
knowledge of woolen and worsted manufacture by the production of twenty 
yards of fabric from his own design (or reproduction or modification of some 
existing fabric) beginning with the raw material. 

A formal typewritten description, including all calculations and observations, 
together with samples from each machine, must be presented to the head of the 
department before the final examination. [Courses II, III, VI, Options G, W, 
D, S.] 

Textile Testing — G-31. Preparation: B-23, F-30 or G-30, D-24. The 

object of this course is to familiarize the student with present-day methods of 
determining the physical properties of textile fibers, yarns and fabrics. The ap- 
plication of physical laws and methods of measurements, as studied in the course 


53 

of Physics, is used in the study of physical characteristics of textile material. The 
work is given to students in advanced courses, and consists of lecture and labora- 
tory work. Reports are prepared from each experiment, giving the object of the 
experiment, method of procedure, observation and conclusions, in order that the 
student may acquire practice and understand the interpretation of data. A special 
testing laboratory is provided, and a considerable number of the best standard 
fiber, yarn and fabric testing instruments of foreign and American make have been 
installed and are used for instruction in the testing of textile materials. The labora- 
tory is equipped with means for making and keeping the humidity constant, so 
that tests can be made under uniform or standard conditions of humidity and 
temperature. [Courses I, II, III.] 

Technology of Wool and Allied Fibers — Lectures and Demonstrations — 
G-40. Preparation: C-21, C-32, D-10. This course is planned to supplement 
the instruction already given in design, cloth construction, chemical technology 
of fibers, scouring, dyeing and finishing, with sufficient lectures and demonstrations 
in sorting, scouring, backwashing, gilling, combing, top-making, English drawing, 
spinning, twisting, warping, and weaving, to make the processing of grease wool and 
allied fibers into ordinary worsted spun yarn fabrics, clear as to object and con- 
tinuity. 

The manufacture of virgin and reworked wool into woolen spun fabrics, with 
scouring, carbonizing, mixing, picking, carding, spinning, twisting, warping and 
weaving is also given. Illustrated descriptions of the manufacture of hardened, 
woven and needle loom felts are taken up. 

Mechanical details and calculations are subordinated to familiarizing the student 
with the nature and object of the several processes. [Course IV.] 

FINISHING DEPARTMENT— H 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing— H-30. Preparation: B-I2, C-10, D-10, 
D-24. The outline of this course, which is given by means of lecture and laboratory 
work, is as follows : — 

Burling and Mending. — Under this head is taken up for consideration the 
examination of flannel as it comes from the loom ; the construction, use and loca- 
tion of the perch; the methods used in marking defects, measuring, weighing and 
numbering of cloths; also the methods of inspection for fancies, single cloths and 
double cloths. The object of burling, mending and the types of tables employed, 
the method of removing knots, runners, etc., the object of back shearing and the 
use of burling irons, the replacing of missing threads and the importance of sew- 
ing as a part of the finishing process, are all considered in detail. The removal of 
oil and tar spots as well as stains of various kinds is studied. 

Fulling. — This branch covers a study of the conditions of the flannel as it 
comes from the loom, and the influence of oil, etc., upon the procedure. Con- 
siderable time is devoted to the various methods of producing a felt, the early 
types of stocks, hammer falling and crank stocks, and their modifications and 
development into the present type of rotary fulling mills of both the single and 
double variety. The details of construction in all machines are carefully taken 
up and include the design and composition of the main rolls, methods of cover- 
ing, regulation and means of adjusting the pressure of traps and rolls, considera- 
tion of the shoes, the use and regulation of the various types of stop motion, the 
different types of stretchers, guide rolls and throat plates. 

The theory of felt is taken up and the influence of pressure, moisture, heat, 
alkali and acid is considered, as well as the hydroscopic and felting properties of 
different wool fibers. The preparation of the flannel for the mill and the usual 
methods of determining shrinkages, as well as the various methods -of soaping, 
are given careful attention. The preparation of various fulling soaps and the 
value of each for the reduction of various degrees of felt as well as the determi- 
nation of the proper amount of alkali for various goods, are carefully studied 
and demonstrated. The manipulation of the various kinds of goods in the mill, 
viz., all wool, shoddies and mixed goods, is studied in classroom and by operation 
in the mill. 

The change in weight and strength for each operation is carefully considered, 
as is also the value of the flocks made in each. A study of the various methods 


54 

of flocking, such as dry and wet, is considered in both class and machine rooms. 
In each operation the defects likely to materialize are studied, as well as the 
cause thereof, and various methods of modifying or lessening them. 

Washing and Speck Dyeing. — This branch considers the scouring, rinsing 
and washing of goods both before and after the fulling process; the various types 
of washers; and the details of construction, such as suds box, rolls, etc. The 
theory of scouring, uses of Fuller’s earth, salt solutions and scours on the different 
kinds of goods are made clear by practical work in the machine room, where the 
effects due to improper scouring, such as stains, cloudy effects, wrinkles and un- 
clean goods, are demonstrated. The discussion of the necessity of speck dyeing 
follows naturally from the study of these matters, and includes methods of 
preparation, materials used, application and tests required. 

Carbonizing. — This is an important branch of finishing, and includes a study 
of the various carbonizing agents, methods of application, strength of solutions, 
and neutralizing, as well as the machines used. Stains and imperfections result- 
ing from carbonizing are also considered. The drying and tentering machines 
and extractors employed are taken up at this point. 

Gigging, Napping, Steaming, Singeing and Crabbing. — The construction in 
detail of the various types of gigs, nappers, steamers, wet gigs, rolling, stretch- 
ing, crabbing, and singeing machines is discussed, and their actions upon the cloth 
and the results obtained are explained. 

Various methods of obtaining luster and the production of permanent finish 
are considered in connection with steaming and sponging. 

Brushing, Shearing and Pressing. — This includes, as do the other branches, 
a careful treatment of the machine employed, the preparation of the cloth for 
each process, the action of each machine in producing its part of the resultant 
effect. In manipulation of the shear consideration is given to its setting, grind- 
ing and adjustment. With the brushing machine the effect of steaming and 
moisture upon the luster and feel of the goods is shown. A study of the action 
of the presses, both plate and rotary, involves consideration of pressure, steam- 
ing, etc. Special processes to obtain particular effects are taken up, and the part 
played by each machine is explained. The details involved in handling cloth on 
a commercial scale, as, for example, measuring, weighing, ticketing, numbering 
and rolling, are also explained. The necessary calculation and the methods of 
finishing all grades of goods are considered from time to time during the year. 
[Courses II, III, IV, VI, Options G, W, D, S.] 

Cotton Finishing — H-31. Preparation: B-12, C-10, D-10, D-24. The 
outline of the course in the finishing of cotton fabrics is as follows : — 

Cloth Room. — Instruction of the various goods and the object thereof; con- 
struction of the various types of inspecting and trimming machines. 

Shearing. — The object. A consideration of the various types of shares for 
treating one or both sides at the same time; also the use of the usual cleaning 
devices, such as emery, sand and card rolls, beaters and brushes; grinding and 
the adjustment of the various parts. 

The use of brushing and cleaning machines, rolling devices and calender attach- 
ments for gray goods. 

Singeing. — Developing and object of singeing; the construction of singers of 
all types and for various purposes; the use of cooling tanks; steaming devices, 
rolling and brushing attachments. 

Regulation of the flame for various goods, and adjustment of the parts; gas 
and air pressure, water-cooled rolls; the effect of moisture on the cost of singe- 
ing and use of dry cans in connection with singeing; electric singeing. 

Washing. — Open width and string washers, their construction and operation; 
soaps, temperature, squeeze rolls; washing of various goods and the object there- 
of; stains. 

Napping. — The object of napping and the usual method of treating goods; 
various types of nappers, single and double acting; felting nappers; construc- 
tion, grinding and adjustments of various types. 

Water Mangles. — Their objects and the construction of various types; vari- 
ous rolls, iron, husk, etc.; scutchers, their object and constructions. 


55 

Starch Mangles. — The object and construction of all types of starch mangles 
for pure starch and filled goods; various types of rolls, brass, rubber, wood; 
action of doctor blades, etc.; regulation and object of pressure. 

Methods of starching and finishing all standard goods, also a consideration of 
the various substances used, such as starch, softener and fillers; the preparation 
of starch and various methods of application. 

Dryers and Stretchers. — Both horizontal and vertical types of drying cans, 
tenter frames, clips, etc.; the swing motion and the finishes thus produced; ob- 
ject and construction of spraying machines, belt stretchers, short tenters, button 
breakers, etc. 

Calenders. — The object and construction of all types, including the regula- 
tion of pressure and nips for the production of various finishes; various types 
of rolls and their uses, — steel, husk, cotton, paper, etc., the use of hot and cold 
rolls; chasing, friction, embossing and Schreiner calenders, and the various 
finishes produced by each; production of watered effects; beetling machines and 
hydraulic mangles. 

Making-up room, — yarding, inspecting; different types of folds; pressing, 
papering, marking. [Courses I, III, VI, Options G, C, D, S.] 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

All members of the freshman class are required to take a course in physical 
training conducted in the gymnasium under the direction of an instructor in 
physical education. Two periods per week for the entire first year are devoted 
to this work. At the beginning of the year a full record is made of the physical 
examinations carried on by the instructor and a reputable physician that proper 
and beneficial exercise may be prescribed. ‘ 

The object is to give general instruction in the care and strengthening of the 
body, and to so guide the students that they may continue to give proper thought 
to their physical training that their mental development may have its greatest 
effect. 

Proper gymnasium clothing is required and all students must take a shower 
bath following each exercise. 


EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of machinery, inventoried at $330,850.00, is most varied for 
textile educational purposes, and is being constantly augmented. The builders 
of the various machines installed keep in close touch with the Institute, adding to 
the machines such improvements as are made from time to time, and each year 
some new machine will be added by a manufacturer who finds it to his advantage 
to be represented here. This operates to the mutual advantage of student and 
manufacturer. 

Cotton Yarn Department. — The opening and picking section of this depart- 
ment contains a 50-saw Pratt gin used for experimental purposes. For classing 
work, there is a specially equipped section with north light, where Universal 
Standard Grades and Government Staple Standards are available. 

The picking equipment consists of two Kitson pickers, one 40-inch two beater 
breaker lapper with an automatic feeder and one 40-inch finisher lapper with a 
Perham and Davis evener. There is an extra Kirschner patent carding beater to 
be used in this finisher picker. 

The card section has three standard revolving flat top cards, one each from 
Saco-Lowell, Whitin, and Howard and Bullough shops. One of these is equipped 
with a Chapman electric neutralizer to prevent trouble from static electricity. 

The combing section consists of a sliver lapper, one four-head ribbon lapper, one 
two-head comb, and one eight-head comb, all from the Whitin Machine Works. 
There is also one two-head Nasmith comb from John Hetherington and Sons of 
England. 

The drawing frames are all of the single head type. There are two four-delivery 
drawing frames and one railway head from the Saco-Lowell Shops. One frame is 
equipped with both common and metallic drawing rolls, electric stop motions and 
Ermine top roll clearers. The other frame and the railway head both are equipped 
with metallic rolls and mechanical stop motions. Another frame of two deliveries 


5 6 

is from the Howard and Bullough shops. It has electric stop motions and metallic 
drawing rolls. 

The roving section has a complete equipment, slubber, intermediate, fine and 
jack frame from the Saco-Lowell Shops. In addition, there is an intermediate 
frame made by the Woonsocket Machine and Press Company, and a fine frame 
from Howard and Bullough. The last named serves to illustrate the common 
English construction and how it differs from the American construction as illus- 
trated in the other roving machines. 

The spinning equipment is quite varied both with respect to builders and with 
respect to types and sizes. The Saco-Lowell Shops have supplied five different- 
frames varying from 36 to 216 spindles. They are suitable to spin counts from 3s 
to 80s. One is equipped with the LeBlan Roth long draft system, while another 
has a special five roll long draft system built in the Institute. A sixth Saco-Lowell 
frame was supplied by the Acme Machine Company equipped with Chapman ball 
bearing spindles. Four of these frames are equipped with individual motor drives, 
— one chain drive, one Texrope drive, one gear drive and one Washburn clutch 
drive. The Whitin Machine Works is represented by three frames on which counts 
from 3s to over 100s can be spun. One of these frames has an auxiliary equipment 
of SKF roller bearing spindles and is fitted on one side with Casablanca long draft 
equipment. The Howard and Bullough shops have one spinning frame suitable for 
counts from average to fine. This is equipped with an English type of builder 
which distinguishes it from the other frames. One Fales and Jenks frame is present, 
equipped on one side with the Casablanca long draft system. This machine is 
equipped with an individual alternating current motor with a chain drive. One 
spinning mule has been retained to illustrate this peculiar type of spinning. It is 
from Asa Lees Company of England and is suitable for counts above 30.* 

There is one short spooler from the Saco-Lowell Shops. There are two winders 
from the Foster Machine Company, one for single ends either on cones or tubes, 
the other for one, two, or three ends parallel wound, especially for preparation for 
twisting. There is also a one gang Universal No. 50 winder suitable for winding 
ordinary tubes or Franklin Process packages. 

The twisters are suitable for all counts. There is one each from the Saco-Lowell, 
the Howard and Bullough, and the Fales and Jenks Shops. These are all equipped 
for either wet or dry twisting of average and fine counts. There are two twisters 
from the Draper Corporation. These are equipped for wet or dry twisting for 
coarse counts or heavy plies. 

The department has a complete coder waste system as made by the Saco-Lowell 
Shops, consisting of a 40-inch single coder side delivery breaker card; a 40-end 
derby doubler; a 40-inch four coiler finisher card; a combination slubber-inter- 
mediate and a waste spinning frame. This equipment is suitable to spin coarse 
numbers from cotton wastes to be used in such materials as coarse sheeting, osna- 
burgs, twine and mop yarns. 

To prepare mid wastes for re-use there is one single cylinder roving waste opeher 
and one thread extractor, both from the Saco-Lowed Shops. 

With the exception of the opening-picking room the humidity in this department 
is controded automaticady by a system instaded by the American Moistening Com- 
pany. Seven high duty heads supply the necessary moisture and air circulation. 
An adjustable automatic control regulates the humidity to the desired percent. 

The experimental laboratory is equipped with a power driven skein tester for 
determining yarn strength and a Moscrop single thread tester for single end 
strength. There are twist counters for determining the amount of twist and the 
twist contraction. For fine work and for fiber study, there is an analytical balance 
and a Spencer microscope equipped with three objectives, three oculars, ocular 
micrometer, mechanical stage and. Abbe condenser. In addition, there is a gas 
conditioning oven to use in determining moisture content and regain. A number 
of scales and balances, together with yarn reels, roving reels and measuring boards 
make up the equipment for routine mill sizing tests. 

Knitting Section. — The winders for this section include a six-spindle Uni- 
versal winder for cones and tubes and a Payne bobbin winder. 

The machines in the following group are equipped with special attachments 
for producing high splicing, double soling and striped work. The hosiery machines 


57 

include two Acme full automatic, one arranged for 160 needles and the other for 
200 needles; also a Mayo Model C full automatic arranged for 220 needles. Scott 
& Williams have placed in this section four of their machines, Models B-5, K, HH 
and HI. There are three Banner machines, all full automatic, two of which are 
arranged for 220 needles each and one arranged for 160 needles. There is one 
Brinton full automatic arranged for 176 needles and one Branson hand machine 
arranged for 80 needles. For hosiery legs and tops there are five ribbers, made by 
the Wildman Company, with cylinders varying from 33^-534 and arranged for 
needles varying in number from 160-240; two Brinton ribbers-, one arranged for 
176 needles and the other 200 needles; one Brinton tie machine, 1%-inch cylinder 
100 needles and 49 needles; one Universal Ribber 33^-inch diameter, 160 needles. 
To illustrate the fully fashioned type of knitting hosiery there is an 18 section, 39 
gauge Reading legger, with topping stand. 

The underwear machinery consists of one Crane spring needle machine, one Scott 
& Williams ribber, and one Wildman ribber. 

Under the group of flat machines there are three Lamb machines, one arranged 
for knitting gloves and one arranged for knitting sweaters. In addition to these 
there is also a Grosser sweater machine, a Jacquard machine, and a link and link 
machine; a Dubied scarf machine; and a Raschel warp knitter. 

For finishing work this section includes a Grosser 2-thread looper, one Hepworth 
looper, two Beattie loopers; five Union Special sewing machines for overseaming, 
double stitch covering, seaming and welting and vest finishing; six Merrow sewing 
machines, including two shell stitch machines and three overseaming and crocheting 
machines; three Singer machines; three Wilcox & Gibbs sewing machines, including 
a flat lock machine. 

The Philadelphia Metal Drying Form Company has installed a table of six forms 
including men’s, women’s and children’s. 

For instruction in the manufacture of braids the New England Butt Company 
has installed one 24-line Hercules braider, one 12-line braider, one tubular braider, 
and one soutache braider. 

Woolen Yarns Division. — The following machinery and equipment is avail- 
able for use in the manufacture of yarn on the woolen principle. 

Installed by Davis & Furber Machine Company of North Andover, Mass.: 
One wool mixing picker equipped with hopper feed (George S. Harwood & Son), 
one modern 60x40 three cylinder set of cards, single breaker and double finisher, 
each driven by Westinghouse variable speed motors through silent Whitney chains, 
improved Bramwell breaker feed by Harwood & Sons, Davis and Furber Broadband 
intermediate feed and 80 end four bank single apron tape condenser with all change 
gears and pulleys; one set 48x40 cards with single breaker, intermediate, and finisher 
cylinders, Bramwell breaker feed, latest type Apperly-Harwood transfer feeds with 
40 end ring doffers and two apron condenser; one Model B latest type woolen ring 
spinning frame, motor driven, with 60 spindles 2}^-inch rings; one 120 spindle 
spring mule with bobbin holders by the American Bobbin Holder Company; one 
mule headstock mounted on trucks for instruction purposes ; one fancy yarn twister 
with chain and gear equipment; one filet winding drum stand with tension bars, 
wind, etc., for applying card clothing. 

Installed by C. G. Sargent’s Sons Corporation, Graniteville, Mass.: One mul- 
tiplex burr picker for medium wools, one yarn conditioning machine with motor 
drive. 

Installed by Johnson and Bassett, Inc., of Worcester, Mass.: One 120-spindle 
cam mule complete; one mule headstock mounted on trucks for instruction 
purposes. 

Installed by Torrance Manufacturing Company: One sample mixing card for 
blending and matching wool. 

Installed by B. S. Roy & Son, Worcester, Mass.: One card grinding stand with 
two traverse grinders complete. 

Equipment: Modern ferrule type fiber head jack spools and bobbins by U. S. 
Bobbin and Shuttle Company of Lawrence; yarn baskets by Steele Supply Com- 
pany, Cambridge, Mass.; hand cards by Howard Brothers of Worcester and Davis 
& Furber Machine Company; ring travellers by Victor Company; static suppressors 
by Chapman Neutralizer Company. 


58 

Shoddy or Reworked Fiber Division. — Installed by C. G. Sargent's Sons 
Corporation: One cypress screw acid dip tank; one single apron dryer (baker) ; one 
cone carbonizing duster with crush rolls. 

Installed by Schaum & Uhlinger, one steam hydro-extractor. 

Installed by C. S. Dodge of Lowell, one ball bearing rag picker with condenser, 
one bagging stand. 

Installed by John T. Slack Corporation are hundreds of samples of reworked 
wool in all stages from rags to fiber. 

Wool Preparing Division. — Wool sorting and grading is carried on under ex- 
cellent conditions with the following equipment: sorting bench, baskets, bagging 
stands, etc. 

Installed by C. G. Sargent's Sons Corporation: One grease wool cone duster, 
one four bowl scouring train with large hopper feed; one single apron dryer with 
large feeder. 

Top Making Division. — Top for the Bradford or French system is made with 
the following machinery: One double cylinder worsted card (four licker-in) with 
can coder and bading head, complete, by Davis & Furber Machine Company, and 
with a Bramwell automatic feeder supplied by George S. Harwood & Sons. An 
electric neutralizer is furnished on card by the Chapman Electric Neutralizer Com- 
pany. This section also includes a double bowl, 5-cylinder backwasher, with gill 
box, Taylor- Wordsworth & Co., Leeds, England, equipped with blueing motion, 
oiling motion, and Layland patent pressure motion; a weigh gill box and creel and 
one doubling balling head gill box (with double screws) made by the Saco-Lowed 
Shops of Biddeford, Me.; two worsted combs with bailer punch, one made by 
Crompton & Knowles, Worcester, and the second made by James Smith & Sons, 
of Worcester, Mass.; two finishing gill boxes, one known as a can gill box and the 
other a balling head gill box, both made by Hall & Stell, Keighley, England. 

Worsted Yarn Division. — Bradford or English System: For the manufac- 
ture of yarns under the Bradford System of Drawing, Spinning, and Twisting, the 
following machinery as made by Prince Smith & Son, Keighley, England, make up 
the equipment: one revolving creel for 12 balls, one 2-spindle drawing box, one 
4-spindle first finisher, one 12-spindle dandy reducer, one 12-spindle cap spinner, 
one double head can gill box, one 2-spindle gill box, one 2-spindle flyer spinner, one 
12-spindle ring spinner, one 12-spindle 2-fold cap twister, one 12-spindle 6-fold 
ring twister. In addition to this the Saco-Lowell Shops, Biddeford, Me., have in- 
stalled the following machinery to carry on similar work: one 2-spindle drawing box, 
one 6-spindle second finisher, one 24-spindle dandy rover, one 6-spindle cone re- 
ducer, one 8-spindle cone rover, one 48-spindle cap spinner, 5-foot end, one 48- 
spindle cap spinner, 4-foot end, one 48-spindle Boy ring twister. The Universal 
Winding Company has installed one of its 6-gang winders, equipped for cones or 
straight tubes. The Lindsay-Hyde Company has installed a modern skein winder. 

The humidity in the laboratory of the woolen yarns and of the English system 
of worsted yarns is maintained by the American Moistening Company's system 
through its automatic control. In this laboratory are installed six humidifiers 
and four Comin's High Duty heads, which are supplied from an electric-driven 
triplex power pump located in the power house. This same pumping equipment 
supplies the American Moistening Company’s humidifiers operating in the Cotton- 
Yarn Department. 

French System. — For the manufacture of worsted yarns under the French 
System of Drawing and Spinning, the machinery has been made by the Society 
Aisacienne de Constructions Mechaniques, Mulhouse, France, and the equipment 
consists of the following: Model P. L. B. comb with creel for 24 doublings, inter- 
secting gill box (2 heads), gill box (2 heads), first drawing (2 heads), second drawing 
(2 heads), third drawing (2 heads), reducer (4 porcupines), slubber ( 8 porcupines), 
first intermediate (8 porcupines), second intermediate (8 porcupines), rover (8 
porcupines), finisher (16 porcupines), self-acting worsted mule (150 spindles). 

The Saco-Lowell Shops built and installed a ring spinning frame of 60 spindles 
for worsted yarns equipped with individual General Electric Company's motor 
and a Reeves Variable Speed Transmission. 

Twelve turbo humidifier heads automatically controlled by a humidity regulator 
have been furnished by the G. M. Parks Company, Fitchburg, Mass. The com- 


59 

pressed air for these heads is supplied by an Ingersoll-Rand 8 by 8 steam-driven 
air compressor. 

Textile Testing Division. — Complete equipment is available for testing all 
kinds of fibers and fabrics under controlled conditions for breaking strength, 
elasticity, elongation, physical structure, moisture content, oil content, thickness, 
bursting strength, count of yarn, yards per pound, twist, resistance to abrasion and 
other tests of commercial or experimental importance. This equipment includes 
the necessary microscopes and micrometers, a skein-testing machine, and electric 
conditioning oven made by the Emerson Apparatus Company of Boston; single 
yarn and fabric strength-testing machines made by G. R. Smith & Company, 
Bradford, England; a strength-testing machine, capacity 500 kilograms, for testing 
twines and fabrics; a fiber-testing machine for testing fibers and fine yarns with 
capacity, 1 gram to 1.5 kilograms; a yarn strength-testing machine with capacity 
1,000 to 5,000 grams; and a yarn strength-testing machine with capacity 5 to 30 
kilograms, all of which have been made by Louis Schopper, Leipzig, Germany. 
In addition to these there is a standard yarn and fabric testing machine made by 
Henry L. Scott & Company of Providence, R. I., a Mullen Tester, a special abrasion 
machine for testing the resistance to wear of carpets and other pile fabrics, also an 
abrasion machine for testing resistance to wear of twines, tapes, and all stripped flat 
fabrics, one General Electric mercury vapor lamp with stand for top inspection. 
For the automatic control of temperature and humidity there has been installed by 
the American Moistening Company, of Boston, one of its automatic humidity and 
temperature regulators. 

Design and Power Weaving Department. — In the fabric analysis section 
there have been provided chemical balances made by Voland & Sons and Christian 
Becker, necessary twist testers, microscopes, reels, etc., as well as a Torsion cal- 
culation balance made by the Torsion Balance Company of New York. 

In the warp preparation department there has been installed by the Saco- 
Lowell Shops one of its spoolers, besides a slasher for preparing cotton warps; a 
high speed warper, by T. C. Entwistle Company of Lowell. The Whitin Machine 
Company, Whitinsville, Mass., has supplied a 180-spindle, long chain quiller, and 
the Johnson & Bassett Company, Worcester, Mass., a quiller of its make. The 
Universal Winding Company has supplied a winder for cop and bobbin winding 
and an 8-spindle doubler. Also a winder for the high speed warper. 

The woolen and worsted warp preparation department contains two 40-end 
jack spoolers, two spool racks for 12 spools each, one pattern dry frame dresser, 
one pipe and cylinder dresser, one 60-inch reel, one 82-inch reel, and one double 
head beamer, all supplied by the Davis & Furber Machine Company of North 
Andover, Mass. 

The Weaving Department contains four looms supplied by the Draper Cor- 
poration of Hopedale, Mass., which include a plain Northrup, an 8-harness cor- 
duroy, an improved Northrup, a Northrup with dobby. The Stafford Loom Com- 
pany of Readville, Mass., has installed one plain, one cam, one dobby loom and 
one broad sheeting loom, all equipped with individual motors; the Whitin Machine 
Works, Whitinsville, Mass., a side cam twill, a plain print cloth loom, equipped 
with Kip-Armstrong electric warp stop motion; Crompton & Knowles Loom Works 
a jean loom and a plain loom with individual drive. Four of these looms are 
equipped with Abbott cleavers made by the Abbott Wire and Cast Steel Warp 
Cleaving Company, Lisbon Falls, Maine. The Hopedale Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Milford, Mass., has recently installed one of its high speed looms with 
individual motor. 

The fancy loom section includes a Stafford Ideal 16-harness automatic shuttle- 
changing loom, a Whitin 20-harness dobby loom, and the following furnished by the 
Crompton & Knowles Loom Works: Knowles gingham 4 by 1 boxes, Crompton 
gingham 4 by 1 boxes, one Crompton towel 2 by 1 boxes, two Terry towel and one 
huck towel looms, a 16-harness lappet loom, a 20-harness dobby 4 by 1 boxes, 
fancy leno loom, and a Crompton fancy cotton single cylinder 20-harness dobby. 

The woolen and worsted section contains a Knowles 20-harness Gem, a Crompton 
24-harness worsted 4 by 4 boxes, a Crompton 6 by 1 double cylinder 20-harness 
dobby, one heavy 20-harness 4 by 4 boxes, one 20-harness and one 25-harness 
blanket, seven intermediate woolen 25-harness 4 by 4 boxes tfnd two 90-inch 25- 
harness heavy woolen looms. 


60 

The Jacquard loom section includes one Stafford silk loom, 1,200-hook, Halton 
head; one 400-hook, single-lift Schaum & Uhlinger Jacquard, mounted for 4-bank, 
narrow fabric loom; one Skinner Brussels carpet loom, three-quarters wide, equipped 
with 1, 280-hook Jacquard head presented by the Bigelow-Hartford Carpet Com- 
pany, Clinton, Mass. The Crompton & Knowles Loom Works has furnished one 
Knowles fancy loom, single-lift Jacquard; one Knowles fancy loom, double-lift 
Jacquard; one Knowles fancy loom, Jacquard tied up for leno, one Knowles loom, 
4 by 4 boxes, 54-inch, with 600-hook, double-lift, double-cylinder McMurdo 
Jacquard head, tied up for damask napkin designs; one Crompton & Knowles 72- 
inch tapestry loom, with 2,600-hook Halton Jacquard head, one 840-hook, double- 
lift, single-cylinder Jacquard on Crompton & Knowles 4-bank ribbon loom, one 
800-hook, double-lift Knowles Gem silk brocade Jacquard machine, 4 by 4 boxes. 

The silk loom section includes one Stafford silk loom, 20-harness dobby, 2 by 1 
box motion, sliding bar warp stop motion, filling feeler, extended beam stands, 
motor drive; one Crompton & Knowles silk loom, 4 by 4 box motion, 20-harness 
head motion, individual motor drive. 

For the purpose of card cutting there has been furnished one Jacquard fine 
index card-cutting machine by John Royle & Sons, Paterson, N. J.; one Jacquard 
French index card-cutting machine by the same concern. 

Chemistry and Dyeing Department. — The Chemistry Laboratory consists 
of one to give instruction in General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis and 
provides facilities to take 120 students. The Quantitative Laboratory takes care 
of some 50 students and contains the necessary drying closet, steam bath, elec- 
trolytic table, with ample facilities to provide distilled water through the use of a 
Barnstead Water Still. The Balance Room, which is adjacent to the laboratory, 
has eleven analytical balances made by such concerns as Christian Becker, Eimer 
& Amend, and H. L. Becker’s Sons & Company. The Organic Laboratory has 
facilities to take care of approximately 25 students having the necessary equipment 
required in the preparation of basic organic compounds and instruments used in the 
manufacture of dyes such as autoclaves, electric and gas combustion furnaces. 

The Engineering Chemistry Laboratory contains the following equipment: a 
Becker chainomatic Westphal balance, a Stormer viscosimeter, a Doolittle visco- 
simeter, an Engler viscosimeter, Saybolt viscosimeters, Pensky-Martin flash 
tester, Cleveland open cup flash tester, Mahler oxygen bomb calorimeter, Emerson 
oxygen bomb calorimeters, Parr peroxide bomb calorimeter, Parr sulphur bomb, 
New York State closed testers, carbon residue apparatus, Orsat flue gas apparatus, 
Hempel gas analysis apparatus, and the usual chemical apparatus and analytical 
balances. 

The Chemical Textile Testing Laboratory contains the following: a Scott seri- 
graph strength tester, a Scott single strand strength tester, a Freas drying oven and 
Becker analytical balance for moisture determinations, a mercury arc lamp for 
ultra violet, a fadeometer, a launderometer, yarn reels, a twist counter, an extrac- 
tion apparatus, a centrifuge, a Scott regain indicator, a barometer, a Hygrodeik 
hygrometer, Sling psychrometers, a DuNuoy tensiometer, a Zeiss dipping refracto- 
meter, an Abb6 refractometer, a Gaertner spectroscope, a polariscope, a MacBeth 
color matching lamp, a Mackay cloth oil tester, a Duboscq colorimeter, a Lovibond 
tintometer, and the usual chemical apparatus and analytical balances. 

The Microscopy Laboratory has been equipped with the following: a polarizing 
chemical microscope, twelve ordinary microscopes, a Minot rotary microtome, a 
Spencer table microtome, a Zeiss comparison ocular, Chalet lamps, individual 
lamps, Silvermann illuminators, mechanical stages, dark ground illuminators, a 
vertical illuminator, a camera lucida, polarizing equipment, an arc lamp, stools, 
microscope tables, and the usual auxiliaries. 

The Photography and Photomicroscopy Laboratory equipment is as follows: 
Bauschfand Lomb horizontal photomicrographic apparatus, Leitz vertical photo- 
micrographic apparatus, Lucas vertical photomicrographic apparatus, Wratten 
filters, Klieg lamps, dark-room lamps, a projection printer, a graphic camera with 
focal plane shutter; also much small apparatus such as tanks, trays, washers, etc. 

The Chemical Museum has been provided with cases and representative dye- 
stuffs all^furnished by various dyestuff manufacturers of this country and abroad. 
This offers an unparalleled opportunity for students to study and experiment with 
almost all of the representative dyes which are used in the textile industry. 


61 

The Experimental Dyeing Laboratory is equipped with individual benches, 
small dyeing apparatus, reels, balances, apparatus for dye testing, such as frames 
for exposing dyed material to light, and a complete collection of dyestuff samples 
and sample cards. There are also fifty-six steam coil experimental dyeing baths, 
a drying chamber and ageing chamber, in addition to a Hurricane Dryer, Class D, 
made by the Philadelphia Drying Machinery Company, Pennsylvania. Adjacent 
to the Experimental Dyeing Laboratory there has been provided a well-lighted 
room for the storage of a great variety of dyestuffs. Steel shelving has been ar- 
ranged so that the samples are easy of access. All samples are catalogued in a 
card file, thus facilitating their use. 

The Industrial Chemistry Laboratory contains the following: one filter press, 
Type E. T. Shriver & Company; a single-acting triplex plunger pump, Goulds 
Manufacturing Company; a vacuum drying apparatus, a surface condenser, a 
Packard vacuum pump, Norman Hubbard’s Sons; a vacuum evaporator, Swenson 
system, American Foundry and Machine Company; a centrifugal, C. H. Chavant 
& Company; a double jar mill, F. I. Stokes & Company. 

The Experimental Printing Laboratory is equipped with a power-driven, full- 
sized, two-roll calico printing machine, and a smaller one-roll, power-driven print- 
ing machine, both made by Rice, Barton & Fales, Worcester, Mass., a small hand- 
driven, laboratory printing machine, an iron-jacketed steaming chamber, and a 
set of steam-jacketed copper kettles. 

To give instruction in dyeing on a basis which is more comparable with com- 
mercial practice there is provided a laboratory which includes the following equip- 
ment: a small kier, fitted with E. D. Jefferson’s circulating device, a Permutit filter, 
the Permutit Company, New York City; a mercerizing machine, raw stock and 
yarn dyeing machines, Klauder-Weldon Dyeing Machine Company; a jig dyeing 
machine, the Textile-Finishing Machine Company, Providence, R. I.; a set of 
drying cans by the same concern; a chain dyeing machine, T. C. Entwistle Com- 
pany, Lowell, Mass.; a raw stock drying table, Proctor & Schwartz, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; a padding mangle, Arlington Machine Works, Arlington, Mass.; a hydro- 
extractor,- W. H. Tolhurst & Son, Troy, N. Y.; a Psarski experimental dyeing 
machine, a Hussong experimental dyeing machine, equipped for raw stock or 
yarns, a Rodney Hunt sample piece dyeing machine, equipped with an automatic 
temperature and pressure-regulating apparatus, made by C. J. Tagliabue Manu- 
facturing Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. The Franklin Process Company, Provi- 
dence, R. I., has furnished a 25-pound bronze dyeing machine. Of the various dye 
tubs, one is equipped with a Monel metal lining to withstand the action of various 
chemicals and dyes. 

Finishing Department. — The Woolen and Worsted section includes a motor- 
driven Clipper cloth 4-string washer, a fulling mill, and a combination fulling and 
washing mill for jersey fabrics, furnished by the Rodney Hunt Company, Orange, 
Mass. ; a sample fulling mill, a kicker mill, furnished by James Hunter & Company, 
North Adams, Mass. ; an up and down dry gig, a rolling and stretching machine, an 
up and down wet gig, a steam finishing machine, a 60-inch, 3-burner singeing 
machine, adapted for cotton, silk or worsted goods, a 2-cylinder double-acting 
brushing machine. Curtis & Marble Machine Company of Worcester has furnished 
a 60-inch 4-cylinder sanding and polishing machine; a mantle steaming and air- 
cooling machine, equipped with a direct connected motor and a Nash pump; and a 
66J^-inch motor driven, single woolen shear, equipped with list saving motion; 
6-4 double shear, an A. W. C. measuring and weighing machine, furnished by Parks 
& Woolson, Springfield, Vt.; a dewing machine, a 6-4 Voelker rotary press, fur- 
nished by G. W. Voelker & Co., Woonsocket, R. I.; a tentering and drying machine 
furnished by John Heathcote, Providence, R. I.; a single crabbing machine, H. W. 
Butterworth & Son, Philadelphia, Pa. ; a 72-inch woolen napper donated by Davis & 
Furber, North Andover, Mass.; a 32-inch basket hydro-extractor, W. H. Tolhurst, 
Troy, N. Y. ; a Lintz & Eckhardt cloth numbering machine, from Durbro w & Hearne 
Company, New York; a steam press for underwear, United States Hoffman Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y.; a sewing machine, Birch Brothers, Somerville, Mass.; a 
trimming and overseaming machine, The Merrow Machine Company, Hartford, 
Conn. 

The Cotton section includes a 40-inch inspecting and brushing machine, a 


62 

44-inch No. 25 railway sewing and rolling machine, a 44-inch cotton shearing 
machine, Type No. 34, a 44-inch No. 3 steam calender rolling machine, a 40-inch 
cloth folder, a 40-inch winder and measurer, a set of 44-inch shear blades for grinding 
purposes, furnished by Curtis & Marble Machine Company, Worcester, Mass.; 
a 48-inch No. 4 opening, sewing and rolling machine, a No. 1 hand power portable 
railway sewing machine, furnished by Dinsmore Manufacturing Company, Salem, 
Mass. ; a 40-inch 4-tank open soaping machine equipped with patent flushing rolls, 
brass and rubber squeeze rolls and spiral openers, furnished by Birch Brothers, 
Somerville, Mass.; an 84-inch 36-roll, ball bearing, double acting napper, equipped 
with a 7J/£-horsepower General Electric motor drive, furnished by Davis & Furber, 
North Andover, Mass, (the ball bearings were donated by the Fafnir Bearing Com- 
pany, New Britain, Conn.); an 8-inch belt lacer furnished by the Clipper Belt 
Lacer Company of Grand Rapids, Mich.; a 40-inch, 3-roll water mangle, with 
husk and brass rolls and usual attachments and equipped with a 48-inch Mycock 
scutcher, and a 40-inch Mycock cloth expander made by Thomas Leyland & Com- 
pany, Boston; a 40-inch, 2-roll starch mangle, a 40-inch upright drying machine 
with 10 copper cylinders equipped with Files dry can system, Files Engineering 
Company, Inc., Bridgeport, Conn.; a 40-inch sprinkler, a 40-inch, 5-roll Universal 
calender with chasing attachment and equipped with a 40-inch Mycock cloth 
expander, a pasting table with plate, furnished by the Textile-Finishing Machinery 
Company, Providence, R. I.; a 16 by 24 inch bronze-covered stretcher for the 
drying cans, C. A. Luther & Company, Providence, R. I.; a 40-inch double bristle 
stretcher for drying cans, American Finishing Machinery Company, Boston, Mass.; 
a trimming and overseaming machine, The Merrow Machine Company, Hartford, 
Conn.; a 40-inch Tommy Dodd starch mangle, and a 44-inch, 50-foot vibratory 
tentering machine, H. W. Butterworth & Sons Company, Philadelphia, Pa. This 
machine is directly driven by a 7J^-horsepower variable speed motor and is 
equipped with a Schwartz automatic electric guider, made by L. H. A. Schwartz 
& Company, Boston, Mass. 

Engineering Department. — The Steam Engineering Laboratory contains 
the following equipment arranged for experimental purposes: A 50-horsepower 
Allis-Chalmers Corliss steam engine direct connected to an Alder absorption 
dynamometer, and piped to exhaust its steam to the atmosphere, to a Wheeler 
surface condenser or to the Kerr turbine; a Kerr seven-stage turbine driving 
directly a 25-kilowatt Richmond Electric Company’s alternating current generator 
and piped to exhaust either to the atmosphere or the condenser. It may be operated 
either as high pressure or low pressure turbine, and the generator has special con- 
nections to illustrate various commercial phases. In addition there are a 4 by 6 
Deane triplex power pump, two 2-inch centrifugal pumps made by Lawrence 
Machine Company, Lawrence, Mass., a Clayton air compressor and necessary 
tanks, scales and measuring instruments. For the measurement of flow of air 
there are a steam-driven Sturtevant fan and a motor-driven Massachusetts fan 
with heater combined for heating and drying experiments. 

The Electrical Engineering Laboratory consists of two sections, one of which is 
devoted to instruction in the generation and transmission of power, and contains 
the necessary switchboard and instruments to control a 25-kilowatt alternating 
current turbo generator and a 15-kilowatt motor generator set arranged to supply 
either direct or alternating current. In addition there are a 24-horsepower direct 
current Allis-Chalmers motor and a 10-horsepower direct current General Electric 
motor, also a 10 and a 7.5 horsepower General Electric alternating current motor 
besides a General Electric 3-Kilowatt rotary transformer and three Westinghouse 
stationary transformers. The other section of the laboratory is known as the 
instrument laboratory and is for the purpose of giving instruction in the measure- 
ment of current voltage, resistance, and in the calibration of instruments. It con- 
tains a 5-kilowatt Crocker- Wheeler balancer, a 160-ampere hour storage battery, 
a 5-kilowatt 220-volt to 440-volt General Electric transformer, a Westinghouse 
portable wattmeter with current and potential transformers, three wattmeters, two 
ammeters and a voltmeter, all of the General Electric portable alternating current 
type, a 30-volt alternating current Roller Smith voltmeter, a 5 to 10-scale Weston 
ammeter (electro-dynamometer type), a Weston millivoltmeter with 2, 20, 50 and 
200 ampere shunts, three 250-volt direct current Weston voltmeters, a 150-ampere, 


63 

two model 45, two model 260, Weston portable ammeters, a Weston model 260 
voltmeter, a Thompson 50-ampere recording wattmeter, a General Electric rotating 
standard wattmeter, two General Electric induction type watt hour meters, an 
Esterline portable curve drawing wattmeter, a 100-ampere Leeds & Northrup 
Standard Resistance, a Leeds & Northrup Ayrton shunt, a Weston laboratory 
standard voltmeter with 600-volt multiplier, a Leeds & Northrup potentiometer, 
a D’Arsonval wall type galvanometer, a Wheatstone bridge with galvanometer, 
a slide wire bridge and electro-dynamometer, Weston Standard cell, potential phase 
shifter, a standard Leeds & Northrup photometer with Lummer-Brodhun screen, 
and Macbeth illuminometer made by the same concern. 

Machine Shop. — The equipment of the machine shop is as follows: Four 
standard engine lathes, 13-inch swing, 6-foot bed, and an engine lathe, 18-inch 
swing, 10-foot bed; three standard engine lathes, 14-inch swing, 6-foot bed, from 
Flather & Company, Nashua, N. H.; a standard engine lathe, 15-inch swing, 6-foot 
bed, from F. E. Reed Company, Worcester, Mass.; an engine lathe, 18-inch swing, 
6-foot bed from Champion Tool Works, Cincinnati, Ohio; a standard engine 
lathe, 15-inch swing, 6-foot bed, from S. H. Putnam Sons, Fitchburg, Mass.; one 
No. 1 Universal milling machine, with all three feeds automatic, from Kempsmith 
Manufacturing Company, Milwaukee, Wis.; one 24 by 24 inch, 6-foot planer, 
from the Mark Flather Planer Company, Nashua, N. H.; one 23-inch upright drill, 
with back gears and power feed, from J. E. Snyder & Son, Worcester, Mass.; one 
14-inch single sensitive drill, from the Stanley Manufacturing Company, Lawrence, 
Mass.; one No. 1 Universal grinder, from Landis Tool Company, Waynesboro, Pa.; 
five speed lathes, 17-inch swing, 5-foot bed, one 20-inch wet tool grinder, and one 12- 
inch, 2-wheel dry grinder, from J. G. Blount, Everett, Mass. ; an American twist drill 
grinder, from the Heald Machine Company, Worcester, Mass. ; one Type IB port- 
able electric grinder from the Cincinnati Electric Tool Company, Cincinnati, Ohio ; 
one 30-inch grindstone and frame, from the Athol Machine Company, Athol, 
Mass.; a single spindle centering machine, from D. E. Whiton Machine Company, 
New London, Conn.; one 15-inch shaper, from Potter & Johnson, Pawtucket, R. I.; 
one power hacksaw, from the Fairbanks Company, Boston, Mass. ; one cold saw, 
from John T. Burr & Son, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; one Eureka metal power saw, Manning, 
Maxwell & Moore; one Type CC electric drill, Cincinnati Electric Tool Company; 
one Universal milling attachment for Kempsmith milling machine, and one Hisey 
Type B ^-horsepower tool post grinder, Taylor Machinery Company; one No. 2 
Cory bench straightener, Manning, Maxwell & Moore; one No. 3 Universal cutter 
and reamer grinding machine, Browne & Sharpe; a well-equipped tool room con- 
taining a selected stock of the best makes of small tools, such as drills, taps and dies, 
milling cutters, reamers, gauges, micrometers, etc. 

Power, Light, Heat and Ventilating Plant. — In the powerhouse there is 
located the main power-generating apparatus for supplying light, heat and power 
to all departments of the Institute. The equipment here consists of: two 250- 
horsepower Heine water tube boilers, one equipped with a Jones stoker and one 
with Perfection grate, a 300-horsepower Aultman & Taylor horizontal water tube 
boiler, equipped with United States rocking grates, two boiler feed pumps — one a 
Knowles and the other a Deane — a 40,000-pound Cochrane metering open-feed 
heater, which is provided with a Lea recorder, and a Cochrane oil extractor which 
heats and measures all feed water, a 3-inch Venturi meter in feed line with indicating 
manometer as made by the Builders Iron Foundry, Providence, R. I. In the Engine 
Room are located: a Payne 14 by 14 automatic high speed engine, 125-horsepower 
direct connected to 75-kilowatt, 220-volt, direct-current Bullock generator, a 
93 ^ by 11 Nash gas engine of 50-horsepower, 4-cycle type, direct connected to a 
30-kilowatt, 220-volt, direct-current Bullock generator, a 65-kilowatt motor 
generator set, consisting of a direct current motor and an alternating current 
generator made by the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company. A 
steam-driven Ingersoll-Rand 8 by 8 air compressor, for use with Turbo heads, in- 
stalled in the French Spinning Department by the G. M. Parks Company, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. The station switchboard is of marine-finished slate, 90 inches in 
height, and consists of three generator panels and two circuit panels. 

The powerhouse is connected with the main school buildings by a tunnel through 
which all wires, steam and water pipes are carried. 


64 

GRADUATES WITH TITLES OF THESES 


June 6, 1933 

Bachelor of Textile Chemistry 


As thesis is now optional in the Department of Textile Chemist ry and Dyeing : 
no thesis subjects have been listed. 


Edward Babigax . 

Phillip Edward Dempsey 
Haig Markariax .... 
Johx Joseph Murphy . . 

Joseph James Pizzuto, Jr. . 
Gerald Adelbert Rob i liard . 
Aime Albert Savard, Jr. . 
Kexxeth Lawrexce Stearxs 
David Hexry Turcotte . 
Hexry Alfred Wells, Jr. 
Staxley Edward Wojas . 
Edmuxd Joseph Youxg, Jr. . 


Lowell, Mass. 

, Monson, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Elizabeth. X. J. 

Lowell, Mass. 
. Lowell, Mass. 


Bachelor of Textile Exgixeerixg 

Albert Richard Dudley, Lowell, Mass. “A Study of the Possibility of Using 
the Yerigraph to Determine the Regain of Textile Fabrics.” 

Jesus Fortuxato Echecopar, Lima. Peru. '‘The Effect of Regain on the Tensile 
Strength and Elongation of Woolen Yarns.” 

Morris Liflaxd, Roxbury, Mass. “A Study of the Measurement of Luster of 
Textile Fabrics.” 

Theodore Recher, North Providence, R. I. "The Determination of the Rela- 
tion between the Weave and the Strength of Cotton Textile Fabrics.” 


Diploma Graduates 
Wool Manufacture 

Eugexe Fra x cis Craxe, Lowell, Mass. "The Manufacture of a Fancv 
Worsted.” 

Judsox~ Pickerixg Morse, Danvers, Mass. “The Manufacture of a Melton 
Overcoating.” 

Textile Design 

Cabot William Pexxey. Methuen, Mass. “The Evolution of Color from White 
to Multicolors in a Piece of Dress Goods.” 


Prizes awarded in June, 1933 

The Medal of the Xational Association of Cotton Manufacturers awarded to the 
student taking course in Cotton who maintains the highest average in scholarship 
throughout this course. To Cabot William Penney. 

Louis A. Olney Prizes (in the form of books). 

$10 to the student graduating from the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course, 
who, in the opinion of the instructing staff of the department, shall have main- 
tained the highest scholarship through the course. To Joseph James Pizzruto , Jr. 

$10 to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course who 
shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship during his second 
year. To Ernest Lorenzo Dion . 

$5 to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course who 
shall be considered as having attained the second highest scholarship during his 
second year. To James Campbell de Grttchy, Jr. Honorable mention, Joseph Shain 
and Howard Xathaniel Stolzberg. 

$10 to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile Coloring course 
who shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship in first-year 
Chemistry'. To Lee Gale Johnston. 

$o to the student taking the regular Chemistry' and Textile Coloring course who 
shall be considered as having attained the second highest scholarship in first-year 
Chemistry'. To Herbert Alvin Wormwood. Honorable mention, Bernard James 
Tyler and' Moushy Markarian. 


65 


REGISTER OF DAY STUDENTS 


Candidates for Degree 

Class of 1934 

Home Address Lowell Address 

Allen, Grover Stanley, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Beigbeder, Edgar Raymond, IV, Roslindale, Mass. Omicron Pi House 
Birtwell, John Lincoln, IV, East Chelmsford, Mass. - 


3 Osgood Avenue 
49 Butterfield Street 


359 Beacon Street 
18 Marlborough Street 


198 West Sixth Street 


Omicron Pi House 
Phi Psi House 
Omicron Pi House 


86 White Street 


Omicron Pi House 
40 Riverside Street 


53 Mt. Hope Street 
84 Cambridge Street 
24 Belmont Street 


Bukala, Mitchell John, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Donohoe, Edward Joseph, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Dunlap, Parker Frank, VI, Billerica, Mass. 

Forsythe, George, VI, Andover, Mass. 

Fox, David James, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Gifford, Alden Ives, Jr., VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Gillespie, Francis Clifford, IV, North Andover, 

Mass. 

Glowienski, Mitchell, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Graham, Robert Theodore, IV, North Andover, 

Mass. 

Gregory, Robert Crockett, VI, Rockland, Me. 

Hallissy, John Joseph, VI, Manchester, Mass. 

Henderson, Robert James, IV, Swampscott, Mass. 

Kidder, Glen Mortimer, IV, Ayer, Mass. 

Lawson, Russell Munroe, VI, Andover, Mass. 

Leblanc, Gerald Alderic, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Leslie, Kenneth Everett, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Matthews, Raymond Lewis, IV, Gardner, Mass. 

Moody, Leon Eugene, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Morrison, Roland Charles, IV, Dracut, Mass. 

Shah, Shantilal Hiralal, IV, Bombay, India 
Shapiro, Simon, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Smith, Harold, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Thomas, Benjamin, Jr., VI, Nashua, N. H. 

Thomas, Robert Joseph, IV, Lowell, Mass. 24 Loring Street 

Wilkie, Robert Campbell, VI, Newton Centre, Mass. Omicron Pi House 
Wynn, William Joseph, IV, Lowell, Mass. 4 Ames Place 

Class of 1935 

*Abrahamian, Aram, IV, Watertown, Mass. 

Alcott, Albert Stephen, Jr., IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Beattie, John Silas, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Bogdan, John Francis, VI, Nashua, N. H. 

Bradford, Edward Hosmer, VI, Andover, Mass. 

Burke, Joseph Thomas, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Cobb, Joseph Calvin, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Cogswell, Frederick William, IV, Maynard, Mass. 

Connolly, Daniel Francis, Jr., VI, Salem, Mass. 

Cowan, Raymond Bernard, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Curtin, William John, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Daley, Charles Lincoln, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
deGruchy, James Campbell, IV, Stoneham, Mass. 

Diehl, Fred Anton, VI, East Paterson, N. J. 

Dion, Ernest Lorenzo, IV, Lawrence, Mass. 

Dunn, Austin Pember, VI, Shirley, Mass. 

Echavarria, Luis, VI, Medellin, Colombia 
Eismann, Edmund, IV, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Fairbanks, Evan Hobbs, VI, Wakefield, Mass. 

Freeman, Arthur Samuel, VI, Chelsea, Mass. 

Gagnon, Roland Octave, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

*Died Dec. 20, 1933. 


59 Canton Street 
285 Foster Street 


109 Tyler Park 
5 Dover Street 


Phi Psi House 
28 White Street 
49 Second Street 
239 Stevens Street 


Phi Psi House 


Phi Psi House 
9 White Street 


28 White Street 
279 Liberty Street 


66 


Home Address Lowell Address 

Garner, John William, IV, Kezar Falls, Me. Omicron Pi House 

Greenbaum, Hyman Herbert, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Griffin, Vernon Harcourt, IV, Swampscott, Mass. Omicron Pi House 
Grossman, Edward, VI, Providence, R. I. 28 White Street 

Harwood, Ralph, IV, Bronx, N. Y. 28 White Street 

Heffernan, John Vincent, IV, North Smithfield, 

R. I. Phi Psi House 

Holden, Arthur Newton, VI, North Billerica, Mass. 

Jarek, Walter Julius, IV, Lowell, Mass. 74 Eleventh Street 

Kopatch, Chester Marion, IV, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lauder, Robert William, VI, Haverhill, Mass. Omicron Pi House 
Lokur, Swamirao Ramrao, B.S., IV, Ahmedabad, 

India 53 Mount Hope Street 

Morena, Emilio Gomez, Jr., VI, Graniteville, Mass. 

Parechanian, James Humphrey, IV, Lowell, Mass. 1 Summer Court 
Phelan, Leonard John, IV, Ipswich, Mass. 137 Riverside Street 

Plovnick, Max David, IV, Roxbury, Mass. 

Poremba, Leo Louis, IV, Lowell, Mass. 4 Oak Street 

Schoelzel, Herman Walter, IV, Methuen, Mass. 

Shain, Joseph, IV, Roxbury, Mass. 35 White Street 

Stein, William Joseph, VI, East Haven, Conn. 28 White Street 

Stolzberg, Howard Nathaniel, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 28 White Street 
Storey, Edwin Gerald, VI, Chatham, N. J. 43 Plymouth Street 

Sullivan, Joseph Augustus, VI, Lowell, Mass. 28 Grove Street 
Thompson, George Robert, IV, Lowell, Mass. 39 Roper Street 


Class of 1936 

Anthony, Henry Steere, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Basdikis, Charles Apostolos, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Bates, Wesley Elliot, VI, East Milton, Mass. 

Berg, Abraham David, VI, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clarke, John Thomas, VI, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Conant, Gilman Wright, VI, Newtonville, Mass. 
Crawford, Robert Thomas, VI, Boston, Mass. 
Crowley, Margaret Helen, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Farkas, Zoltan Roland, IV, New York, N. Y. 
Fuller, Roland Monroe, VI, Tewksbury, Mass. 
Georgacoulis, George, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Hirsch, Emanuel Herman, VI, Weehawken, N. J. 
Hodgman, Richard Albert, VI, Stoneham, Mass. 
Holgate, Benjamin Alexander, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Ireland, Wilson Gerard, VI, Melrose, Mass. 
Johnston, Lee Gale, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Kaiser, John Raymond, VI, Bloomfield, N. J. 
Kennedy, Robert Gilman, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Landau, David, IV, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Langis, Paul Henri, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

LeBel, Claude Merwin, VI, New York, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Charles Ernest, IV, Mattapan, Mass. 
Luescher, Frank Oscar, IV, Pawtucket, R. I. 
McQuade, Allan John, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Markarian, Moushy, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Muller, Paul John, VI, Weehawken, N. J. 

Olcott, Harry Depew, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Olshinski, Matthew John, VI, North Chelmsford, 
Mass. 

Redmond, James Reynolds, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Roarke, John James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Schaller, Joseph Gregory, IV, Wellesley, Mass. 
Shah, Kanti Kiralal, VI, Bombay, India 


20 Loring Street 
8 Lagrange Street 


28 White Street 


100 Riverside Street 


611 Stevens Street 
32 Mt. Washington Street 

336 Suffolk Street 
43 Plymouth Street 


97 Grove Street 
137 Riverside Street 


65 Sterling Street 

223 Pine Street 

28 White Street 

115 Mt. Washington Street 

43 Plymouth Street 

43 Plymouth Street 

9 White Street 

600 Andover Street 

103 Lawrence Street 

43 Plymouth Street 

56 Mont view Avenue 


84 Bartlett Street 
75 Viola Street 
11 White Street 
53 Mt. Hope Street 


67 


Home Address Lowell Address 

Shann, William Edwin, VI, Putnam, Conn. Phi Psi House 

Stevens, Dexter, Jr., VI, Warwick Neck, R. I. 124 Riverside Street 

Thompson, Henry Albert, IV, North Tewksbury, 

Mass. 

Tyler, Bernard James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 30 Epping Street 

Tyler, Stanley Noyes, VI, Lowell, Mass. 338 Fairmount Street 

Urbanetti, Anthony Joseph, IV, Manchester, Conn. 65 Sterling Street 
Valentine, Preston Sumner, IV, Cochituate, Mass. 53 Mt. Hope Street 
Welch, William Paul, IV, Lowell, Mass. 76 South Highland Street 

Wormwood, Herbert Alvin, IV, North Wilmington, 

Mass. 


Class of 1937 

Allard, Frederick Pratt, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Bassett, Louis Loss, VI, New Haven, Conn. 

Berg, Bernard Robert, VI, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Carroll, Hugh Francis, IV, Medford, Mass. 
Churchill, Harry Coburn, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Cutrumbes, Demosthenes John, IV, Dracut, Mass, 
Daly, William James, VI, Andover, Mass. 

Depoian, Vasken John, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Dick, Kenneth Paul, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Dupee, George Richardson, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Elliott, Charles Henry, VI, Leicester, Mass. 
Fisher, Thomas Nathan, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Hakanson, Gustave Warren, IV, Winchester, Mass. 
Kahn, Seymour James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Kelsey, Winfield Frederick, VI, Middletown, Conn. 
Kiszka, Boleslaw Kazimierz, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Laurence, George Clough, VI, Summit, N. J. 
Lemkin, Uriel William, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Leonard, William Wheeler, Jr., IV, Norwich, Conn. 
Lyle, Robert Keith, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Megas, Charles, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Moushegian, Richard, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Natsios, Basil Andrew, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Nerney, Francis Xavier, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Redman, Howard Bliss, IV, Dracut, Mass. 

Reed, Harold Ernest, IV, Nashua, N. H. 

Regan, Paul William, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Rosenberg, Jacob, VI, Westerly, R. I. 

Sadlier, William Francis, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Spanos, James Peter, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Stanley, Donald Edward, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Stokes, Alfred Roscoe, VI, Rumford, R. I. 

Tonis, James William, IV, Brockton, Mass. 
Vaniotis, Socrates Vasilios, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Wagner, George Frederic, Jr., VI, Lowell, Mass. 
White, William Sayles, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Wilkinson, Herbert William, Jr., IV, Providence, 
R. I. 

Wright, George Ward, Jr., IV, Newton Centre, 
Mass. 


104 Eleventh Street 
28 White Street 
28 White Street 


214 Third Street 


8 Gates Street 
22 Wetherbee Avenue 
213 Branch Street 
137 Riverside Street 
100 Sanders Avenue 


714 Gorham Street 
50 Standish Street 
211 Lakeview Avenue 
37 Varney Street 
24 D Street 
Omicron Pi House 
86 Orleans Street 
114 Rock Street 
400 Central Street 
98 Lewis Street 
46 Dana Street 


16 Linden Street 

28 White Street 
385 Gorham Street 

14 West Bowers Street 
706 Stevens Street 
11 White Street 
142 Riverside Street 
13 Willie Street 
42 Marlborough Street 

29 Monadnock Avenue 

137 Riverside Street 
65 Sterling Street 


Diploma Students 

Class of 1934 

Bridges, Herbert Gardner, II, West Newbury, Mass. 43 Plymouth Street 
Doyle, Kenneth Barr, II, Springfield, Mass. Phi Psi House 

Huyck, William Francis, II, Lowell, Mass. 157 Nesmith Street 

Stevens, William Edwin, I, West Warwick, R. I. 137 Riverside Street 


68 

Class of 1935 

Home Address 
Bogacz, John, III, Lowell, Mass. 

Boynton, Bradford Lewis, II, Andover, Mass. 
Jessen, Robert Frederick, I, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Salpas, Cosmos George, III, Lowell, Mass. 


Lowell Address 
53 Melrose Avenue 

Omicron Pi House 
232 Adams Street 


Class of 1936 

Beattie, Ralph William, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Dursin, Louis Jules, II, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Finlay, Harry Francis, Jr., II, Holbrook, Mass. 
Gould, Charles Edwin, II, Portland, Me. 
Raymond, Gardner Lawrence, III, Bedford, Mass. 
Robbins, Lucy Wiley, III, Lowell, Mass. 

Wilson, Raymond Bachmann, II, Pawtucket, R. I. 


285 Foster Street 
793 Merrimack Street 
150 Riverside Street 
148 Riverside Street 


102 South Loring Street 
146 Parkview Avenue 


Special Students 

Athanasopoulos, Louis Peter, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Baranowski, John, III, Lowell, Mass. 

Bliss, Dorothy Myrtle, III, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Campbell, Raymond Mellnotte, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Corlew, Rufus Edward, Ph.B., Ill, Lowell, Mass. 
Cwiklik, John Edward, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Dalphond, Alphonse, III, Dracut, Mass. 

Dewey, William Tarbox, B.A., II, Quechee, Vt. 
Dudley, Albert R., B.T.E., III, Lowell, Mass. 
Dupuis, Lucien Romeo, III, Lewiston, Me. 
Kwarciak, Benjamin, III, Southbridge, Mass. 
Laramy, Edwin, III, Concord, N. H. 

Liebmann, Herman, IV, New York, N. Y. 

Lord, Howard Foxon, B.C.E., III, Stoughton, Mass. 
Mueller, Arthur John, III, Lawrence, Mass. 
Nathan, Emanuel Geoffrey, A.B., II, Boston, Mass. 
Papaconstantinou, Fotoula Argyres, IV, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Ripley, Franklin Fuller, B.A., II, Troy, N. H. 
Schoonmaker, Weld Day, B.A., II, Ware, Mass. 
Small, Raymond Lionel, IV, Waterville, Me. 


235 Adams Street 
4 Joiners Court 


85 Hastings Street 
390 Wilder Street 
84 Common Street 


Marlborough Hotel 
126 Coburn Street 
486 Merrimack Street 


43 Plymouth Street 
Phi Psi House 


798 Rogers Street 

Marlborough Hotel 
43 Plymouth Street 
Omicron Pi House 


69 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF GRADUATES 

The following list has been corrected in accordance with information received 
previous to February 1, 1934. Any information regarding incorrect or missing 
addresses is earnestly solicited. 

B.T.C. indicates the degree of Bachelor of Textile Chemistry; B.T.D. indicates 
the degree of Bachelor of Textile Dyeing; B.T.E. indicates the degree of Bachelor 
of Textile Engineering; D indicates a diploma; C indicates a certificate (covering 
a partial course only). Degrees were issued beginning with the year 1913. 

Abbot, Edward Moseley, II, ’04 (D). Manufacturer, Abbot Worsted Company, 
Graniteville, Mass. 

Abbott, George Richard, II, ’08 (D). Andover, Mass. 

Adams, Floyd Willington, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). 

Adams, Henry Shaw, I, ’05 (D). Assistant Treasurer, The Springs Cotton 
Mills, Chester, S. C. 

Adams, Tracy Addison, IV, ’ll (D). Vice-President and General Manager, 
Arnold Print Works, North Adams, Mass. 

Albrecht, Charles Henry, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.)* Chief Chemist, Atlantic Mills, 
Providence, R. I. 

Allard, Edward Joseph, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chemist, National Aniline & Chemical 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Almquist, George John Edwin, I, ’19 (D). Second Vice-President, Passaic- 
Bergen Lumber Company, Passaic, N. J. 

Anderson, Arthur Illman, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Associate, Department of Re- 
search, Laundryowners National Association, Joliet, 111. 

Anderson, Arthur Julius, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). Salesman, National Aniline and 
Chemical Company, 40 Rector Street, New York City 
Anderson, Clarence Alfred, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Cost Department, Manville- 
Jenekes Company, Manville, R. I. 

Anderson, Harold Robert, II, ’26 (D). Research and Time Study Department, 
Abbot Worsted Company, Forge Village, Mass. 

Annan, David, II, ’23 (D). 105 Almont Street, Winthrop, Mass. 

Arienti, Peter Joseph, IV, ’10 (D). Chief Chemist and Dyer, Sayles Finishing 
Plants, Inc., Saylesville, R. I. 

Arundale, Henry Barnes, II, ’07 (D). Textile Analyst for G. H. Heath & Co., 
Ltd., Macclesfield, England, East Orange, N. J. 

Atwood, Henry Jones, II, ’23 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Daniels Manufac- 
turing Company, East Brookfield, Mass. 

Babb, Charles Wilkes, Jr., II, ’31 (D). With Knox Woolen Company, Camden, 
Maine. 

Babigan, Edward, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 121 Bellevue Street, Lowell, Mass. 
Babigan, Raymond, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Associate Examiner, United States 
Patent Office, Washington, D. C. 

Bachelder, Charles Edward, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.) Superintendent of Acetate Yarn 
Division, Tennessee Eastman Corporation, Kingsport, Tenn. 

Bagshaw, Herbert Arthur Edward, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.) . With Wannalancit Tex- 
tile Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Bailey, Joseph W., I, ’99 (D). Agent, Booth Manufacturing Company, New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Bailey, Lester Harold, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, American Printing 
Company, Fall River, Mass. 

Bailey, Walter James, IV, ’ll (D). Bailey’s Cleansers and Dyers, Watertown, 
Mass. 

Baker, Franz Evron, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Cotton Yarn Department, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Baker, Maurice Sidney, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Merchant, Baker’s, Nonvood, Mass. 
Baker, William John, IV, ’16 (D). Supervisor, DuPont Rayon Company, Old 
Hickory, Tenn. 

Baker, William Samuel, I, ’26 (D). Assistant Systemizer, Nashua Manufactur- 
ing Company, Nashua, N. H. 


70 

Balch, Ralph Herman, YI , ’29 (B.T.E.). With Celanese Corporation of Amer- 
ica, Amcelle, Md. 

Baldwin, Frederick Albert, II, ’04 (D). Vice-President and Secretary, Walter 
Blue & Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Bard, Morry Arnold, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). President, Silver Line Dye Works, 
Inc., New York City. 

Barlofsky, Archie, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). Lawyer, Barlofsky & Barlofsky, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Barr, I. Walwin, I, ’00 (D). Second Vice-President, Buckley Brothers Company, 
881 Broadway, New York City. 

Barrett, Andrew Edward, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Field Engineer, Armour & Co. 
(Industrial Soap Division), North Bergen, N. J. 

Barry, Leo Joseph, II, ’27 (D). With Bell Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Barry, Marie Gertrude, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 31 Hoyt Avenue, Lowell, Mass. 

Bauer, Harold Conrad, III, ’28 (D). With Henry Bauer, Lawrence, Mass. 

Beck, Frederic Christian, II, ’24 (D). In business, Weld & Beck, Southbridge, 
Mass. 

Beeman, Earl, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Research Department, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, 

Mass. 

Bell, Edward Benjamin, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, The Buromin 
Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bennett, E. Howard, II, ’03 (C). Publisher, Frank P. Bennett & Co., 530 
Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Bentley, Byron, II, ’26 (D). With Joseph Bentley Hair Company, Methuen, 
Mass. 

Bergeron, Alvin Wilfred, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Celanese Corpora- 
tion of America, Amcelle, Md. 

Berry, Wilbur French, II, ’17 (D). 

Bertrand, Arthur Leon, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Dyeing Department, United States 
Bunting Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Bienstock, George Jerrard, III, ’24 (D). Styler, Yorkshire Worsted Mills, 
New York, N. Y. 

Billings, Borden Dickinson, I, ’29 (D). Industrial Engineer, Weybosset Mill, 
Providence, R. I. 

Bird, Clarence Henry, II, ’22 (D). Superintendent, George E. Duffy Manufac- 
turing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Bird, Francis John, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). 30 West Street, Attleboro, Mass. 

Blaikie, Howard Mills, II, ’ll (D). 17 Maywood Avenue, Maywood, N. J. 

Blake, Parker Gould, VI, ’14 (D). District Manager, Claude Denis & Co., Ltd., 
Toronto, Ont. 

Blanchard, John Lawrence, II, ’23 (D). Designer, Farnsworth Company, 
Lisbon Centre, Me. 

Bodwell, Henry Albert, II, ’00 (D). With Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, 
80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Booth, James Mooney, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.)* Salesman, The Huron Milling Com- 
pany, Inc., 9 Park Place, New York City. 

Bottomley, John, III, ’28 (D). Assistant Designer, Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Boyd, George Andrew, I, ’05 (D). Treasurer, Worcester Bleach & Dye Works 
Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Brackett, Martin Richard, II, ’22 (D). Selling Agent, 450 7th Avenue, New 
York City. 

Bradford, Harold Palmer, II, ’25 (D). 90 Beach Street, Malden, Mass. 

Bradford, Roy Hosmer, II, ’06 (D). Selling Agent, Textile Machinery, 161 
Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

Bradford, William Swan ton, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). Assistant Superintendent, Dress 
Goods Division, Lawrence Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Bradley, Raymond Frost, VI, ’14 (D). Garage Proprietor, Twin Light Garage, 
267 East Main Street, Gloucester, Mass. 

Bradley, Richard Henry, V, ’01 (C). Gasoline Salesman, Fairhaven, Mass. 

Brainerd, Arthur Travena, IV, ’09 (D). Manager, Ciba Company, 325 West 
Huron Street, Chicago, 111. 


71 

Brainerd, Carl Emil, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Superintendent of Dyeing, F. C. Huyck 
& Sons, Albany, N. Y. 

Brandt, Carl Dewey, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Head of Textile Engineering Depart- 
ment, Texas Technological College, Lubbock, Texas. 

Brannen, Leon Vincent, III, ’07 (C). 

Brickett, Chauncy Jackson, II, ’00 (D). Director, School of Textile Manufac- 
turing and Designing, International Correspondence School, Scranton, Pa. 

Brickett, Raymond Calvin, II, ’14 (D). Overseer, M. T. Stevens & Sons Com- 
pany (Marland Mills), Andover, Mass. 

Brigham, Howard Mason, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Wellington, Sears & 
Co., 65 Worth Street, New York City. 

Bronson, Howard Seymour, II, ’27 (D). Overseer of Knitting, Portage Hosiery 
Company, Portage, Wis. 

Brosnan, Willian Francis, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Vice-President and General Man- 
ager, Antipyros Company, 338 Berry Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brown, Gerald Marston, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). With Monomac Spinning Company, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Brown, Philip Franklin, II, ’23 (D). Manager, Special Products Section, 
DuPont Rayon Company, 350 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Brown, Rollins Golthwaite, IV, ’12 (D). 

Brown, Russell Lee, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Assistant Professor, Department of 
Woolen Yarns, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Brown, Will George, Jr., IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Hide & Leather 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Buchan, Donald Cameron, II, ’01 (D). Assistant Superintendent, M. T. 
Stevens & Sons Company, North Andover, Mass. 

Buchan, Norman Spaulding, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). 36 Joliet Street, Laconia, N. H. 

Burbeck, Dorothy Maria, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). See Garlick, Mrs. Dorothy M. 

Burger, Samuel Joseph, III, ’24 (D). President, Heat Maintenance Service, 
Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Burnham, Frank Erwin, IV, ’02 (D). Chemist and Dyer, Henry Klous Com- 
pany, Lawrence, Mass. 

Burns, Robert, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Celanese Corporation of America, 
Amcelle, Md. 

Burtt, Joseph Frederic, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). With Abbot Worsted Company, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Buzzell, Harry Saville, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Color Technician, Oxford Paper 
Company, Rumford, Maine. 

Callahan, John Joseph, Jr., II, ’26 (D). Color Chemist, Technicolor Motion 
Picture Corporation, Boston, Mass. 

Cameron, Elliott Francis, IV, ’ll (D). Attorney-at-law, Willard, Allen and 
Mulkern, 100 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

Campbell, Alexander, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Mechanical Engineer, Charles T. Main, 
Inc., Engineers, 201 Devonshire Street, Boston', Mass. 

Campbell, Allan, Jr., VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). 601 East Eighth Street, South Boston, 
Mass. 

Campbell, Louise Porter, Illb, ’03 (C). With Ginn & Co., 15 Ashburton Place, 
Boston, Mass. 

Campbell, Orison Sargent, II, ’03 (D). Manager, Industrial Felts, Ltd., 
Kitchener, Ont. 

Cannell, Philip Stuart, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Hotel Manager, Carlton Hotel, 
Malden, Mass. 

Carbone, Alfred John, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Sandoz Chemical 
Works, 36 Purchase Street, Boston, Mass. 

Carleton, Joseph Raddin, III, ’30 (D). Assistant Designer, The Bridgeport 
Coach Lace Company, Chelsea, Mass. 

Carr, George Everett, I, ’05 (D). Industrial Engineer, C. F. Mueller Company, 
180 Baldwin Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 

Carr, Paul Edward, II, ’24 (D). Designer, Cascade Woolen Mills, Oakland, Me. 

Carter, Robert Albion, IV, ’02 (D). District Sales Manager, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours & Co., Birdsboro, Pa. 


72 

Carter, Russell Albert, II, ’25 (D). Textile Engineer, Hampton Company, 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Cary, Julian Clinton, VI, ’10 (D). Branch Manager, The American Mutual 
Liability Insurance Company, 12 Haynes Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Casey, Francis Harold, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Hodges Finishing Company, 
East Dedham, Mass. 

Caya, Ferdinand Joseph, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Gotham Silk 
Hosiery Company, Inc., Wharton N. J. 

Chamberlin, Frederick Ellery, I, ’03 (D). Overseer of Spinning, Monument 
Mills, Housatonic, Mass. 

Chandler, Proctor, IV, ’ll (D). Manager, Chandler Manufacturing Company, 
56 Amherst Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Chang, Chi, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Chang, Wen Chuan, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Dah Sung Cotton Mill No. 1, Nantung, 
Kiangsu, China. 

Chapman, Leland Hildreth, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Vice-Principal, Hingham High 

School, Hingham, Mass. 

Chen, Shih Ching, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Shanghai, China. 

Chen, Wen-Pei, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). 

Chisholm, Lester Bury, I, ’ll (D). Textile Development, U. S. Rubber Com- 
pany, Providence, R. I. 

Church, Charles Royal, II, ’06 (C). Physical Director, San Diego High School, 
San Diego, Calif . 

Churchill, Charles Whittier, III, ’06 (D). Manager, Churchill Manufacturing 
Company, Inc., Lowell, Mass. 

Clapp, F. Austin, II, ’04 (D). Insurance Broker, White Plains, N. Y. 

Clark, Earl William. IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). Salem Depot, N. H. 

Clark, Thomas Talbot, II, ’10 (D). President and Treasurer, Talbot Mills, 
North Billerica, Mass. 

Clarke, George Dean, II, ’21 (C). Dyer, Seamans & Cobb Thread Mills, Hop- 
kinton, Mass. 

Clayton, Harold Edmund, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Manager, Brown Hosiery Com- 
pany, Lowell, Mass. 

Cleary, Charles Joseph, II, ’13 (D). Textile Technologist, United States Army 
Air Corps, Dayton, Ohio. 

Clement, David Scott, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Nashua Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Nashua, N. H. 

Cleveland, Richard Sumner, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Research, National 
Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C. 

Clifford, Albert Chester, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Western Electric 
Company, Inc., Kearny, N. J. 

Clogston, Raymond B., IV, ’04 (D). Superintendent of Dyeing, Merrimack 
Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Cluett, John Girvin, I, ’29 (D). Textile Analyst and Assistant to Superintendent 
at Bleachery, Cluett, Peabodv & Co., Inc., Peebles Island, V T aterford, N. Y. 
Coan, Charles Bisbee, IV, ’12 (D). 

Coffey, Daniel Joseph, III, ’28 (D). Quality Man on Blankets, F. C. Huyck 
& Sons, Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Cohen, Arthur Edward, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). 

Cohen, Raphael Edvab, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Sales Manager, Merrimack Paper 
Tube Company, Inc., Lowell, Mass. 

Colby, J. Tracy, VI, ’16 (D). Sales Manager, F. C. Huyck & Sons, Empire State 
Building, Room 3006, New York City. 

Colby, Willard Alvah, Jr., IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Utica Wdllowvale 
Bleaching Company, Chadwicks, N. Y. 

Cole, Edward Earle, IV, ’06 (D). Financial Agent, The Bradstreet Company, 
Boston, Mass. 

Cole, James Thomas, II, ’05 (D). 1357 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, Mass. 
Collonan, Herbert Joseph, II, ’22 (D). College Weavers, Inc., Northampton, 

Mass. 

Coman, James Groesbeck, I, ’07 (D). Manager, Mexia Textile Mills, Mexia, 

Texas. 


73 

Conant, Harold Wright, I, ’09 (D). Assistant Treasurer, United Elastic Cor- 
poration, Easthampton, Mass. 

Conant, Richard Goldsmith, I, ’12 (D). Sales Executive, Wellington, Sears & 
Co., 65 Worth Street, New York City. 

Conklin, Jennie Grace, Illb, ’05 (C). See Nostrand, Mrs. William L. 

Connor, Thomas Francis, II, ’28 (D). North Cohasset, Mass. 

Connorton, John Joseph, Jr., Ill, ’27 (D). Designer, Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Cook, Kenneth Bartlett, I, ’13 (D). Technical Manager ; Manville-Jenckes 
Company, Manville, R. I. 

Corbett, James Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Calco Chemical Company, 
Bound Brook, N. J. 

Cote, Theodore Charles, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Merrimack Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Craig, Albert Wood, IV, ’07 (D). Superintendent, Windsor Print Works, North 
Adams, Mass. 

Craig, Clarence Eugene, III, ’02 (D). 

Crane, Eugene Francis, II, ’33 (D). 517 Westford Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Creese, Guy Talbot, IV, ’14 (D). Leather Manufacturer, Creese & Cook Com- 
pany, Danversport, Mass. 

Crowe, Joseph Bailey, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Procter & Gamble 
Co., Ivory dale, Ohio. 

Culver, Ralph Farnsworth, IV, ’04 (D). Vice-President and Manager, Provi- 
dence Office, Ciba Company, Inc., 61 Peck Street, Providence, R. I. 

Cummings, Edward Stanton, VI, ’16 (D). Industrial Engineer, with Ralph E. 
Loper & Co., Greenville, S. C. 

Curran, Charles Ernest, III, ’02 (C). Head Designer, Wood Worsted Mills, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Currier, Herbert Augustus, I, ’06 (D). Vice-President, Waterman, Currier & 
Co., Inc., 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Currier, John Alva, II, ’01 (D). Superintendent of Fabrics Department, M. T. 
Stevens & Sons Co., North Andover, Mass. 

Curtis, Frank Mitchell, I, ’06 (D). Retail Lumber, Wm. Curtis Sons Company, 
10 Blue Hill Parkway, Milton, Mass. 

Curtis, William Leavitt, II, ’05 (C). 

Cutler, Benjamin Winthrop, Jr., Ill, ’04 (D). Department Manager, Worth 
Textile Company, 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Cuttle, James H., II, ’99 (D). Vice-President and General Manager, S. Stroock 
& Co., Inc., Newburgh, N. Y. 

Dalton, Gregory Smith, IV, ’12 (D). 

Danahy, Arthur Joseph, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Dyestuff Chemist, Ciba Company, 
325 West Huron Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Darby, Avard Nelson, II, ’28 (D). General Foreman, Plant No. 2, Merrimac 
Hat Corporation, Amesbury, Mass. 

Datar, Anant Vithal, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Secretary and Manager, The Pulgaon 
Cotton Spinning, Weaving and Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Pulgaon, C.P., India. 

Davidson, Sydney, III ’28 (D). 64 Devon Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

Davieau, Alfred Edward, VI, ’16 (D). 

Davieau, Arthur Napoleon, VI, ’13 (D). Superintendent, Kenwood Mills, 
Ltd., (F. C. Huyck & Sons), Arnprior, Ont. 

Davieau, Leon Arthur, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). With United States Rubber Company 
(Textile Section), Market and South Streets, Passaic, N. J. 

Davis, Alexander Duncan, VI, ’14 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Northeastern Uni- 
versity, Springfield, Mass. 

Dearborn, Roy S., VI, ’13 (D). Salesman, Dumas & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Dearth, Elmer Elbridge, IV, ’12 (D). General Plant Manager, The Fisk Rub- 
ber Company, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Del Plaine, Parker Haywood, IV, ’25 (B. T. C.). Southern Manager, Rohm & 
Hass Company, Inc., 1109 Independent Building, Charlotte, N. C. 

Dempsey, Phillip Edward, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Palmer Road, Monson, Mass. 


74 

Derby, Roland Everett, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Chemist, M. T. Stevens & Sons 
Company, North Andover, Mass. 

de Sa, Francisco, VI, ’18 (B.T.E.). Avenue da Graca, Bahia, Brazil. 

Dewey, James French, II, ’04 (D). President, A. G. Dewey Company, Quechee, 
Vt. 

Dewey, Maurice William, II, ’ll (D). Montpelier, Vt. 

Dillon, James Henry, III, ’05 (D). 

Dods, James Barber, II, ’27 (D). Vice-President and General Manager, The 
Dods Knitting Company, Ltd., Orangeville, Ont. 

Dolan, William Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Lowell Bleachery South, 
Griffin, Ga. 

Donald, Albert Edward, II, ’04 (D). Agent, H. T. Hayward Company, Frank- 
lin, Mass. 

Donovan, Joseph Richard, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). 

Doran, Wilbur Kirkland, II ’22 (D). 

Dorr, Clinton Lamont, VI, ’14 (D). Merchant, Raymond’s, Inc., 356 Wash- 
ington Street, Boston, Mass. 

Douglas, Walter Shelton, II, ’21 (D). Estimator, Douglas & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Dudley, Albert Richard, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). 126 Coburn Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Duggan, Paul Curran, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Assistant Chemist, Gotham Silk 
Hosiery Company, 580 First Avenue, New York City. 

Duguid, Harry Wyatt, I, ’24 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Maverick Mills, 
East Boston, Mass. 

Dunlap, Kirke Harold, Jr., VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Kenwood Mills, 
Ltd., Arnprior, Ont. 

Dunnican, Edward Tunis, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Instructor in Textile Work, 
Passaic Public Schools, Passaic, N. J. 

Durgin, William Ernest, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Geigy Company, 
Inc., 88 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

Duval, Joseph Edward, II, ’10 (D). Yarn Agent, 3701 North Broad Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dwight, John Francis, Jr., II, ’08 (D). Hazel Avenue, Scituate, Mass. 

Echecopar, Jesus Fortunato, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). ’ Moquegua 466, Lima, Peru. 

Echmalian, John Gregory, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). Director, State Trade School, 
South Manchester, Conn. 

Ehrenfried, Jacob Benjamin, II, ’07 (C). Manager, George Ehrenfried Com- 
pany, Lewiston, Maine. 

Elliott, Gordon Baylies, II, ’12 (D). Planning Department, Pacific Mills, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Ellis, Charles Albert, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). 901 Danforth Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Ellis, Dorothy Myrta, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Junior Cotton Technologist, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Ellis, James Oliver, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Purchasing Department, Sidney Blumen- 
thal & Co., Inc., Shelton, Conn. 

Emerson, Frank Warren, II, ’03 (D). 130 Butman Road, Lowell, Mass. 

Engstrom, Karl Emil, VI, ’12 (D). (S.B. 1916, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology.) 36 Fairfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Enloe, Winfred Paige, I, ’22 (D). Assistant Superintendent, The W. A. Handley 
Manufacturing Company, Roanoke, Ala. 

Evans, Alfred Whitney, III, ’03 (D). 

Evans, Paul Richard, II, ’29 (D). Salesman, United States Testing Company, 
Hoboken, N. J. 

Evans, William Robinson, III, ’03 (D). 309 Main Street, Bradford, Mass. 

Everett, Charles Arthur, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). Instructor, Dyeing Department, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Ewer, Nathaniel Trull, IV, ’01 (D). 

Fairbanks, Almonte Harrison, II, ’09 (D). President and General Manager, 
Fairwood Knitting Mills, Wakefield, Mass. 

Farley, Clifford Albert, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Research Engineer, F. C. Huyck & 
Sons, Rensselaer, N. Y. 


75 

Farmer, Chester Jefferson, IV, ’07 (D). (Ph.D. Harvard University.) Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, 111. 

Farnsworth, Harold Vincent, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Atkinson, 
Haserick & Co., 152 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. 

Farr, Leonard Schaefar, II, ’08 (D). Superintendent, No. 2 Mill, Farr Alpaca 
Company, Holyoke, Mass. 

Farwell, Claude Chapman, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Groton, Mass. 

Fasig, Paul Leon, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Thomas T. Davis & Son, Reading, 
Pa. 

Feinberg, Benjamin, II, ’27 (D). General Manager, Bradford Hat Company, 
Haverhill, Mass. 

Feindel, George Paul, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Union Bleachery, Green- 
ville, S. C. 

Feldstein, Martin Alexander, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Radio Engineer, Amplex 
Instrument Laboratories, New York City. 

Fels, August Benedict, II, ’99 (D). 190 Carroll Street, Paterson, N. J. 

Ferguson, Arthur Feiling, I, ’03 (D). 

Ferguson, Thomas Dickson, Jr., VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). With Gilbert Knitting 
Company, Little Falls, N. Y. 

Ferguson, William Gladstone, III, ’09 (D). Assistant Agent, Ludlow Manufac- 
turing Associates, Ludlow, Mass. 

Ferris, Arthur Leon, II, ’28 (D). Port Rowan, Ont. 

Finlay, Harry Francis, IV, ’10 (D). Chemist and Salesman, National Aniline 
and Chemical Company, Boston, Mass. 

Fisher, Russell Todd, VI, ’14 (D). ’25 (B.T.E.). Secretary, National Associa- 
tion of Cotton Manufacturers, 80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Fiske, Starr Hollinger, II, ’09 (D). Owner and Manager, Wing’s Cash Market, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Fitzgerald, John Francis, IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Golden Bell Cleaners, Inc., 
Malden, Mass. 

Fitzgerald, John Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, United States Finishing 
Company, Providence, R. I. 

Fleischmann, Meyer, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist, Real Silk Hosiery Mills, 
Inc., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fleming, Frank Everett, IV, ’06 (D). Superintendent, Dyeing and Finishing, 
Goodall Worsted Company, Sanford, Maine. 

Fletcher, Howard Varnum, III, ’25 (D). Sales Supervisor, Sun Oil Company, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fletcher, Roland Hartwell, VI, ’10 (D). Engineering Department, Pressed 
Steel Car Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Flood, Thomas Henry, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Chemist, National Aniline & Chemical 
Company, Toronto, Ont. 

Flynn, Thomas Patrick, IV, ’ll (D). With United States Testing Company, 
Hoboken, N. J. 

Ford, Edgar Robinson, IV, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Dyeing and Finishing, 
Sayles Biltmore Bleacheries, Biltmore, N. C. 

Ford, Stephen Kenneth, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Marden-Wild Corporation, 
500 Columbia Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Forsaith, Charles Henry, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Superintendent, Nashua Manu- 
facturing Company (Jackson Mills), Nashua, N. H. 

Forsaith, Ralph Allen, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). In charge of Textile Section, Anderson- 
Meyer Company, Ltd., Shanghai, China. 

Forsyth, Harold Downes, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Treasurer, Wm. Forsyth & Sons 
Company, Lynn, Mass. 

Foster, Boutwell Hyde, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). Manager, Textile Section, United 
States Rubber Company, Passaic, N. J. 

Foster, Clifford Eastman, II, ’01 (D). 35 Mt. Vernon Street, New Bedford, 
Mass. 

Fowle, Edwin Daniels, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Associate Editor, “Textile World,” 
330 West 42nd Street, New York City. 

Franks, Jerome, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). (M.S. 1929, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology.) 44 Midwood Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 


76 

Fredrickson, Charles Joseph, Jr., IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Chemist, White & Hodges, 
Everett, Mass. 

French, Wallace Howe, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Second Hand in Dye House, Law- 
rence Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Frost, Harold Benjamin, II, ’12 (D). Salesman, Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Fuller, Allen Reed, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, A. E. Staley Manufactur- 
ing Company, Decatur, 111. 

Fuller, George, I, ’03 (D). Consulting Textile Specialist, Cox and Fuller, 320 
Broadway, New York City. 

Gahm, George Leonhard, II, ’06 (D). Superintendent, Wood Worsted Mills, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Gainey, Francis William, IV, ’ll (D). 81 Como Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gale, Harry Laburton, III, ’10 (D). With J. P. Stevens Company, 44 Leonard 
Street, New York City. 

Gallagher, Arthur Francis, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Overseer of Dyeing, Hillsborough 
Mills, Wilton, N. H. 

Gallagher, John Waters, II, ’27 (D). 19 Robinson Avenue, Danbury, Conn. 

Garlick, Mrs. Dorothy M. (Burbeck, Dorothy M.), IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). 192 

Great Road, Maynard, Mass. 

Garner, Allen Frank, II, ’30 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Kezar Falls Woolen 
Company, Kezar Falls, Me. 

Gaudet, Walter Urban, II, ’29 (D). Resident Engineer, Liberty Mutual Insur- 
ance Company, Charlotte, N. C. 

Gay, Olin Dow, II, *08 (D). President, Gay Brothers Company, Cavendish, Vt. 

Gerrish, Walter, III, ’03 (D). 

Gillie, Stanley James, I, ’22 (D). Manager, Greensboro Sampling House of the 
United States Testing Company, Inc., 526 Walker Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 

Gillon, Sara Agnes, Illb, ’06 (C). 

Gilman, Ernest Dana, II, ’26 (D). Designer, Pacific Mills, Worsted Division, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Gleklen, Leo, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer and Chemist, Hope Knitting 
Company, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Glickman, Bernhardt Brecher, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). (B.S. 1931, Columbia Uni- 
versity.) Optometrist, 602 Fresh Pond Road, Ridgewood, N. Y. 

Glowacki, Joseph, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). 105 Salem Street, Andover, Mass. 

Godfrey, Harold Thomas, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Davis & Furber Ma- 
chine Co., North Andover, Mass. 

Goldberg, George, VI, *10 (D). Manufacturer’s Agent, Liberty Lace and Braid 
Company, 88 Bedford St., Boston, Mass. 

Goldenberg, Louis G., VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). Foreman of Knitting, Raynit Mills, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldman, Moses Hyman, IV, *20 (B.T.C.). Goldman’s Moleo Products Com- 
pany, 390 Cambridge Street, Allston, Mass. 

Golec, Edward Lucian, III, ’32 (D). Salem Depot, N. H. 

Goller, Harold Poehlmann, II, ’23 (D). Salesman, Greenville, S. C. 

Goodhue, Amy Helen, Illb, *00 (C). See Harrison, Mrs. Arthur. 

Gooding, Francis Earle, IV, *19 (B.T.C.). Superintendent, Calco Chemical 
Company, Bound Brook, N. J. 

Goosetrey, Arthur, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). 

Goosetrey, John Thomas, IV, *21 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, New York Mills 
Corporation, New York Mills, N. Y. 

Gottschalck, Lawrence William, VI, *28 (B.T.E.). With Scott & Williams, 
Inc., 366 Broadway, New York City. 

Gould, Norman Culver, VI, *19 (B.T.E.). Designer, F. C. Huyck & Sons, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Greenbaum, Herbert Baron, III, *29 (D). 

Greenberg, Archie, II, *21 (D). President and Treasurer, Archie Greenberg 
Inc Worcester Tvlass 

Greendonner, George John, Jr., IV, *30 (B.T.C.). With National Aniline & 
Chemical Co., Inc., Buffalo, N. Y. 




77 

Greenwood, John Roger, Jr., II, ’27 (D). Assistant Superintendent, D. N. 
Taft Manufacturing Company, Oxford, Mass. 

Gross, Herman Peter, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 94 Shanley Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Guild, Lawrence Winfield, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). With Guild Brothers, Inc., 75 
Kneeland Street, Boston, Mass. 

Gwinnell, George Harry, II, ’25 (D). Head Designer, Berkshire Woolen Com- 
pany, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Gyzander, Arne Kolthoff, IV, ’09 (D). With National Aniline and Chemical 
Co., Inc., 40 Rector Street, New York City. 

Haddad, Nassib, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, United States Rubber 
Company, Passaic, N. J. 

Hadley, Richard Francis, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). With Parks & Woolson Machine 
Company, Springfield, Vt. 

Hadley, Walter Eastman, IV, ’08 (D). Consulting Chemist, 5 Mountain 
Avenue, Maplewood, N. J. 

Hadley, Wilfred Nourse, II, ’22 (D). Manager, Parks & Woolson Machine 
Company, Springfield, Vt. 

Hager, Hazen Otis, II, ’21 (C). Treasurer, Suburban Gas and Equipment Com- 
pany, Portland, Maine. 

Hale, Alfred Sandel, IV *09 (D). Vice-President and Treasurer, Liondale 
Bleach, Dye & Print Works, Rockaway, N. J. 

Hale, Ralph Edgar, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, The Bell Company, 
Worcester IVTass. 

Hall, Frederick Kilby, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). (A.M. 1930, The George Washington 
University.) Economist, United States Department of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Hall, Stanley Arundel, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). 904 Main Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Halsell, Elam Ryan, I, ’04 (C). Assistant Superintendent, Whittenton Manu- 
facturing Company, Taunton, Mass. 

Hammond, Chester Twombly, II, *23 (D). South Acton, Mass. 

Hanscom, Edwin Thomas, II, *27 (D). Assistant Production Manager, Hart- 
ford Woolen Mills, Hartford, Vt. 

Hardie, Newton Gary, I, ’23 (D). Superintendent, Oconee Mills Company, 
Westminster, S. C. 

Hardman, Joseph Edwin, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 1102 Chelmsford Street, Chelms- 
ford, Mass. 

Hardy, Philip Lewis, VI, ’10 (D). Contractor, Andover, Mass. 

Harmon, Charles Francis, I, *99 (D). 

Harrington, Thomas, IV, *15 (D). Superintendent, Monarch Leather Com- 
pany, 1127 West Division Street, Chicago, 111. 

Harris, Charles Edward, I, *05 (D). Superintendent, Martin Rocking Fifth 
Wheel and Trailer Company, Westfield, Mass. 

Harris, George Simmons, I, ’02 (C). Treasurer, Springs Cotton Mills, Charlotte, 
N. C. 

Harrison, Mrs. Arthur (Goodhue, Amy Helen), Illb, *00 (C). R. F. D. No. 
2, Lowell, Mass. 

Hart, Arthur Norman, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). 

Hart, Howard Roscoe, I, ’23 (D). General Superintendent, Aiken Mills, Inc. & 
Seminole Mills, Langley, S. C. 

Haskell, Walter Frank, IV, *02 (D). Overseer of Dyeing, Dana Warp Mills, 
Westbrook, Maine. 

Hassett, Paul Joseph, IV, *12 (D). With L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters, 
Inc., Cortland, N. Y. 

Hathaway, William Tabor, II, ’26 (D). Civil Engineer, United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, Boston, Mass. 

Hathorn, George Wilmer, IV, *07 (D). Chemist, Lawrence Gas & Electric 
Company, Lawrence, Mass. 

Hathorne* Berkeley Lewis, IV, *24 (B.T.C.). Consulting Chemist, Hathorne & 
Green, 114 East 32nd Street, New York City. 

Hay, Ernest Crawford, II, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Monomac Spinning Com- 
pany, Lawrence, Mass. 


78 

Haynes, Amos Kempton, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Sales Representative and Demon- 
stratorj Rohm & Haas Co., Inc., 1109 Independence Building, Charlotte, N. C. 

Hegy, Gerard John Joseph, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). Hegy’s, Inc., Cleaners and 
Dyers, Holyoke, Mass. 

Hendrickson, Walter Alexander, II, ’ll (D). With National Knitting Com- 
pany, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hennigan, Arthur Joseph, II, ’06 (D). President, Bornemann Company, 229 
Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Hetherman, Patrick Joseph, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Chemist, 28 Rutland Street, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Hibbard, Frederick William, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Investment Broker, Andrews 
& Hibbard, 701 Bay State Building, Lawrence, Mass. 

Hildreth, Harold William, II, ’07 (D). Westford, Mass. 

Hillman, Ralph Greeley, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Assistant Superintendent, Samson 
Cordage Works, Shirley, Mass. 

Hindle, Milton, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Department of Textile Engineer- 
ing, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Hintze, Thomas Forsyth, I, ’06 (C). 

Hockridge, Stanley Squire, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Assistant, Arnold 
Print Works, North Adams, Mass. 

Hodge, Harold Bradley, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). 69 Summer Street, South Manchester, 
Conn. 

Hoffman, Richard Robert, II, ’21 (C). 

Holbrook, Ralph Wentworth, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist, Crompton 
Company, West Warwick, R. I. 

Holden, Francis Crawford, IV, ’09 (D). Chemist, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 1155 
Manhattan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Holden, John Sanford, II, ’20 (D). Manufacturer, Automatic Machine Prod- 
ucts Company, Attleboro, Mass. 

Holgate, Benjamin, III, ’02 (C). Agent, Boott Mills, Lowell, Mass. 

Hollings, James Louis, I, ’05 (D). 16122 84th Drive, Jamaica, N. Y. 

Hollstein, William Diedrick, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Student, New York University 
and Bellevue Medical College, New York City. 

Holmes, Otis Milton, VI, ’13 (B.T.E.). Draftsman, United Shoe Machinery 
Corporation, Beverly, Mass. 

Holt, Laurence Currier, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Textile Technician, Research 
Division, Celanese Corporation of America, Amcelle, Md. 

Hood, Leslie Newton, IV, ’12 (D). Bleachery Superintendent, Selma Manu- 
facturing Company, Selma, Ala. 

Hook, Russell Weeks, IV, ’05 (D). Textile Chemist, Arthur D. Little, Inc., 
30 Charles River Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

Hooper, Clarence, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Burlington Mills Company, 
Burlington, N. C. 

Horne, James Albert, I, ’24 (D). Salesman, Wellington, Sears & Co., 65 Worth 
Street, New York City. 

Horsfall, George Gordon, II, ’04 (C). Assistant Dyer, Interwoven Mills, Inc., 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Horton, Chester Temple, VI, ’14 (B.T.E.). Wilmington, Mass. 

Hosmer, Frank Barbour, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). 

Houghton, Robert Kingsbury, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist, Bigelow- 
Sanford Carpet Company, Thompsonville, Conn. 

Howard, Lome Fernley, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Salesman, George Mann & Co., 
Providence, R. I. 

Howarth, Charles Lincoln, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). Assistant Professor of Dyeing, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Howe, Woodbury Kendall, I, ’10 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Merrimack 
Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Howorth, Harmon, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Development, Celanese Corpo- 
ration of America, Amcelle, Md. 

Hoyt, Charles William Henry, IV, ’07 (D). 27 Lenox Avenue, White Plains, 
N. Y. 

Hsu, Hsueh-Chang, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 


79 

Hubbard, Harold Harper, I, *22 (D). Salesman, J. H. Lane & Co., 250 West 
57th Street, New York City. 

Hubbard, Ralph King, IV, ’ll (D). President and Treasurer, Packard Mills, 
Inc., Webster, Mass. 

Huising, Geronimo Huerva, I, ’08 (D). 

Hunt, Chester Lansing, III, ’05 (C). 

Hun ton, John Horace, II, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Wool Department, Nashua 
Manufacturing Company, Nashua, N. H. 

Hurd, Ira Swain, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Plant Chemist, Glenjyon Print Works, 
Phillipsdale, R. I. 

Hurtado, Leopoldo, Jr., VI, ’10 (D). General Manager, Hurtado & Co., Uruapan 
Michoacan, Mex. 

Hurwitz, Jacob, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). 

Hutton, Clarence, III, ’03 (C). Proprietor, Central Garage, Quincy, Mass. 

Hyman, Wolfred, II, ’28 (D). Clothier, Hyman Brothers, Boston, Mass. 

Irvine, James Andrew, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). East Pepperell, Mass. 

Isaacson, George Franklin, II, ’26 (D). With Clarence S. Brown & Co., 40 
Worth Street, New York City. 

Ivers, Gerald Anthony, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Instructor, Lowell High School, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Jaeger, Robert William, Jr., IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Lubrication Engineer, Standard 
Oil Company (Indiana), 910 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Jarek, Julius, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Research Chemist, American Powder Company, 
Maynard, Mass. 

Jelleme, William Oscar, I, ’10 (D). With Pacific Mills, 214 Church Street, New 
York City. 

Jen, Shang Wu, I, ’21 (D). 

Jessop, Charles Clifford, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Louis Levy & Co., 
40 East 34th Street, New York City. 

Johnson, Arthur Kimball, IV, ’13 (D). (S.B. 1917, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology.) With George D. Millett, Andover, Mass. 

Johnson, George Henry, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Director of Research, American 
Institute of Laundering, Joliet, 111. 

Johnson, Norman Albin, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Editor, Howes Publishing Com- 
pany, 440 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Johnson, Philip Stanley, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). 

Jones, Bliss Morris, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Herrick & Voigt, 220 East 42nd 
Street, New York City. 

Jones, Everett Amos, III, ’05 (D). Superintendent, Nye & Wait Kilmarnock 
Corporation, Auburn, N. Y. 

Jones, Nathaniel Erskine, I, ’21 (D). Assistant Superintendent, E. L. Watkins 
Company, Portland, Maine. 

Joslin, Harold Wheeler, II, ’28 (D). Milford, N. H. 

Joy, Thomas, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Industrial Oils, Gulf Refining Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

Jury, Alfred Elmer, IV, ’04 (D). Agent, Winnsboro Mills, Winnsboro, S. C. 

Kaatze, Julius, VI, *22 (B.T.E.). 

Kao, Chieh-Ching, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Karanfilian, John Hagop, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). 

Kay, Harry Pearson, II, ’09 (D) . Associate Member, Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Kendall, Charles Henry, II, *23 (D). Superintendent, Bridgewater Woolen 
Company, Bridgewater, Vt. 

Kennedy, Francis Charles, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Product Development Depart- 
ment, The Fisk Rubber Company, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Kenney, Frederick Leo, II, *27 (D). Superintendent, Uxbridge Worsted Com- 
pany, Uxbridge, Mass. 

Kent, Clarence LeBaron, III, *06 (C). Manager, Standard Oil Company, South 
Portland, Maine. 


80 

Keough, Wesley Lincoln, II, ’10 (D). 491 Eldora Road, Pasadena, Calif. 

Killheffer, John Vincent, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Manager, E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Charlotte, N. C. 

Kilmartin, John Joseph, I, ’31 (D). Research Department, Bates Manufactur- 
ing Company, Lewiston, Me. 

King, Daniel Joseph, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 158 Pleasant Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Kingsbury, Percey Fox, IV, ’01 (D). 323 Terhune Avenue, Passaic, N. J. 

Knowland, Daniel Power, IV, ’07 (D). Chief Chemist, Geigy Company, Inc., 89 
Barclay Street. New York City. 

Knox, Joseph Carleton, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Sanitary Engineer, Massachusetts 
Department of Health, Boston, Mass. 

Kolsky, Samuel Irving, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.)* 

Konieczny, Henry, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 1276 Bridge Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Kostopoulos, Emanuel Arthur, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). 270 Adams Street, Lowell, 

Mass. 

Krishan, Maharaj, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Montgomery, India. 

Kuo, Limao, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). In charge of Quality Testing Division, Shanghai 
Bureau of Inspection and Testing of Commercial Commodities, Shanghai, 
China. 

Lamb, Arthur Franklin, II, ’10 (D). In business, Cleansing and Dyeing, Rock- 
land, Maine. 

Lamont, Robert Laurence, II, ’12 (D). Secretary, L. F. Grammes & Sons, Inc., 
Allentown, Pa. 

Lamprey, Leslie Balch, IV, ’16 (B.T.D.). 18 Holton Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lamson, George Francis, I, ’00 (D). 117 Westford Circle, Springfield, Mass. 

Lane, John William, I, ’06 (C). 

Lane, Oliver Fellows, IV, ’15 (B.T.D.). Chemist, Head of Color Making Depart- 
ment, Lowe Paper Company, Ridgefield, N. J. 

Larratt, John Francis, II, ’22 (D). Glenark Mill, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Laughlin, James Knowlton, III, ’09 (D). 

Laurin, Eric Thursten Lawrence, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Chemist and Colorist, 
Sayles Finishing Plant, Saylesville, R. I. 

Laurin, Sven Albert, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Student, Boston University, School of 
Theology, Boston, Mass. 

Leach, John Pelopidas, I, ’00 (C). Cotton Warehouseman, Littleton Cotton 
Warehouse. Littleton, N. C. 

Leavitt, George Herbert, II, ’26 (D). Time Study Engineer, F. C. Huyck & 
Sons, Albany, N. Y. 

Lee, William Henry, II, ’05 (C). Manager, Graves Hall & Co., Inc., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Leitch, Harold Watson, IV, ’14 (B.T.D.). General Superintendent, Worsted 
Division, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lemire, Joseph Emile, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Mathematics Instructor, Lowell High 
School, Lowell, Mass. 

Leonard, Leo Edward, I, ’27 (D). Designer, Worcester Textile Company, Valley 
Falls, R. I. 

Lewis, George Kenneth, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Traveling Salesman, Sonoco Prod- 
ucts Company, Plainfield, N. J. 

Lewis, LeRoy Clark, IV, ’08 (D). Raw Silk and Rayon Broker, 23 Ludington 
Avenue, Clifton, N. J. 

Lewis, Walter Scott, IV, ’05 (D). East Falls Church, Va. 

Lifland, Abraham, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Artistic Dyeing Company, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lifland, Bessie, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Mill Laboratory, Massachusetts Knitting 
Mills, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Lifland, Morris, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). General Manager, Brockton Webbing Com- 
pany, Campello, Mass. 

Lillis, Marvin Hale, IV, ’14 (D). 40 Lawrence Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lindsly, Walter Coburn, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Bigelow-Sanford 
Carpet Company, Thompsonville, Conn. 

Linsey, Edward, II, ’25 (D). 140 Boylston Street, Malden, Mass. 


81 

Logan, George Leslie, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Secretary, Tompkins Brothers Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lombard, Carleton Joshua, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 45 Walnut Street, Arlington, 
Mass. 

Loney, Robert William, II, ’22 (D). Production Manager and Assistant Super- 
intendent, Chautauqua Worsted Mills, Jamestown, N. Y. 

Longbottom, Parker Wyman, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Claremont Waste 
Manufacturing Company, Claremont, N. H. 

Loveless, Ever ton Hanscom, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.) . Research Engineer, Pacific Mills, 
Rayon Division, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lowe, Philip Russell, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Inspector, Associated Factory Mutual 
Fire Insurance Companies, Boston, Mass. 

Lucey, Edmund Ambrose, II, ’04 (D). Consulting Engineer, 791 Main Street, 
South Manchester, Conn. 

Lussier, Joseph Adrien, II, ’27 (D). Staff Superintendent, Hood Rubber Com- 
pany, Inc., Watertown, Mass. 

McAllister, Gordon Algeo, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). North Billerica, Mass. 

McCann, John Joseph, Jr., VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). 90 Beech Street, Lowell, Mass. 

McCool, Frank Leslie, IV, ’10 (D). Resident Manager, Sandoz Chemical Works, 
Inc., 930 New Industrial Trust Building, Providence, R. I. 

Macdonald, Hector Graham, IV, ’19 (B. T. C.). Superintendent of Dyeing, 
Franklin Process Company, Providence, R. I. 

McDonald, Gerald Francis, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). With Merrimack Hat Corpora- 
tion, Amesbury, Mass. 

McDonald, John Joseph, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Teacher of Testing and Dyeing, 
Textile High School, New York, N. Y. 

McDonnell, William Henry, I, ’06 (C). Lawyer, McDonnell & White, 40 Court 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

McDougall, Francis Gerard, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). U. S. Postal Department, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McGee, Francis Patrick, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Teacher, Lowell High School, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McGowan, Frank Robert, VI, ’15 (B.T.E.). Wool Technologist, Bureau of 
Agricultural Economics, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

McGowan, Henry Earl, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Lowell High School, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McGuire, Edward Perkins, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). With James McCreery & Co., 
6 West 34th Street, New York City. 

Mackay, Stewart, III, ’07 (D). Assistant Professor of Textile Design, Lowell 
Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

McKay, Benedict Josephus, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Stoughton, Mass. 

McKenna, Hugh Francis, IV, ’05 (D). Chicago Manager, United Indigo and 
Chemical Company, Ltd., 218 West Kinzie Street, Chicago, 111. 

McKinnon, Norman, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Chelmsford, Mass. 

McKinstry, James Bradley, II, ’25 (D). Superintendent, Millbury Woolen Com- 
pany, Millbury, Mass. 

McKittrick, Raymond Wellington, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). 15 Hawthorne Street, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McLean, Earle Raymond, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Industrial Fellow, Mellon Institute 
of Industrial Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MacPherson, Wallace Angus, III, ’04 (D). Designer, Wuskanut Mills, Inc., 
Farnumsville, Mass. 

McQuaid, Barton Mathewman, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). North Billerica, Mass. 

Macher, Henry, II, ’23 (D). Secretary, Central Importing Company, Inc., of 
New Jersey and New York, New York City. 

Maguire, James Joseph, II, ’28 (D). Assistant Designer, Glenark Mill (Ux- 
bridge Worsted Company), Woonsocket, R. I. 

Maher, Margaret Mary, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Hub Hosiery Mills, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Mahoney, George Stephen, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Superintendent, Franklin Cotton 
Mill Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 


82 

Mailey, Howard Twisden, II, ’08 (D). Manufacturing Superintendent, Worsted 
Manufacturing, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Manning, Frederick David, IV, ’10 (D). With Bigelow, Kent & Willard, Park 
Square Building, Boston, Mass. 

Marinel, Walter Newton, I, ’01 (D). Auto Mechanic, North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Mark, Aris Sawa, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Sales Department, Franklin Manufacturing 
Company, Inc., 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Markarian, Haig, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Drug Clerk, Arlington Mills, Lawrence, 

Mass. 

Marshall, Chester Stanley, II, ’22 (D). Assistant Superintendent, College 
Weavers, Inc., Northampton, Mass. 

Martin, Harry Warren, IV, ’ll (D). Manager, Canvas Footwear, Hood Rub- 
ber Company, Inc., Watertown, Mass. 

Mason, Archibald Lee, VI, ’09 (D). Concord Road, Billerica, Mass. 

Mason, Philip Edwin, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.)* Chemist, Watson Park Company, 470 
Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Mather, Harold Thomas, VI, ’13 (D). Inspector, Associated Factory Mutual 
Fire Insurance Companies, Boston, Mass. 

Mathieu, Alfred Jules, II, ’20 (D). Salesman, Wools and Commission Dyeing, 
Woonsocket, R. I. 

Matthews, Elmer Clark, II, ’17 (D). General Manager, Thermo Mills, Inc., 
West Sand Lake, N. Y. 

Matthews, Robert Jackson, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Woolen Salesman, Pacific Mills, 
261 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Mauersberger, Herbert Richard Carl, III, ’18 (D). Textile Consultant, 303 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Mazer, Samuel, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). In business, Dyer and Converter of Yarns, 
S. Mazer & Co., Mattapan, Mass. 

Meadows, William Ransom, I, ’04 (D). Cotton Registrar, Chicago Board of 
Trade, Chicago, 111. 

Meehan, John Joseph, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 35 Varney Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Meek, Lotta, Illb, ’07 (C). See Parker, Mrs. Herbert L. 

Meeker, Samuel, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Textile Dyeing & Printing Com- 
pany of America, Hawthorne, N. J. 

Meinelt, Herbert Eugene, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Ayer Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Merchant, Edith Clara, Illb, ’00 (C). Supervisor of Art, Public Schools, Lowell, 

Mass. 

Merrill, Allan Blanchard, IV, ’ll (D). Technical Superintendent, B. F. Good- 
rich Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Merrill, Gilbert Roscoe, VI, ’19 (B.T.E.). Professor of Textiles; in charge of 
Cotton Yarn Department, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Merrill, John Leslie, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). Instructor in Weaving, Lowell Textile 
Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Meyers, Chester William, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Associate Dyer, Massachusetts 
Knitting Mills, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Mid wood, Arnold Joseph, IV, ’05 (D). Salesman, Dyestuffs Corporation of 
America, 281 Franklin Street, Boston, Mass. 

Miller, Joshua, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Research Associate, Celanese Corporation of 
America, National Association of Dyers and Cleaners Institute, Silver Springs, 
Md. 

Minge, Jackson Chadwick, I, ’01 (C). 

Mirsky, Leon Robert, II, ’19 (D). 229 West 97th Street, Apartment 3-B, New 
York City. 

Mitchell, Charles Alvah, II, ’24 (D). Assistant Superintendent of Woolen De- 
partment, Roxbury Carpet Company, Saxonville, Mass. 

Moller, Ernest Arthur, II, ’22 (D). Eastern Representative, Petroleum Divi- 
sion, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Inc., Boston, Mass. 

Molloy, Francis Henry, II, ’16 (D). 35 Pope Street, Hudson, Mass. 

Moore, Edward Francis, II, ’25 (D). Superintendent, La Crosse Hosiery Com- 
pany, La Crosse, Wis. 

Moore, Everett Byron, I, ’05 (D). President and Treasurer, The Bridgeport 
Coach Lace Company, Chelsea, Mass. 


83 

Moore, Karl Remick, IV, ’ll (D). Industrial Engineer, American Printing 
Company, Fall River, Mass. 

Moore, William Joseph, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Colorist, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, 
Mass. 

Moorhouse, William Roy, IV, ’01 (D). Resident Manager, National Aniline 
and Chemical Company, Inc., 150 Causeway Street, Boston, Mass. 

Moran, Edward Francis, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Assistant Superintendent of Dyeing 
and Drying, Lawrence Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Morrill, Howard Andrew, VI, ’16 (D). 

Morris, Merrill George, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Chemist, National Aniline & Chemi- 
cal Co., 357 West Erie Street, Chicago, 111. 

Morrison, Haven Asa, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Overseer of Dyeing, The Barre Wool 
Combing Company, Ltd., South Barre, Mass. 

Morse, Judson Pickering, II, ’33 (D). With Draper & Co., Inc., 421 Summer 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

Mullaney, John Francis, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). 417 Fairburn Building, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Mullen, Arthur Thomas, II, ’09 (D). Industrial Manager, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, West Concord, Mass. 

Munroe, Sydney Philip, I, ’12 (D). Assistant to President, Cotton Textile 
Institute, Inc., 320 Broadway, New York City. 

Murphy, John Joseph, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Assistant, Bates Manu- 
facturing Company, Lewiston, Me. 

Murray, James, IV, ’13 (D). Chemist, Martin Cantine Company, Saugerties, 
N. Y. 

Murray, James Andrew, II, ’10 (D). President, Murray Chocolate Company, 
162 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 

Myers, Walter Flemings, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). With Talbot Mills, North Billerica, 
Mass. 

Najar, G. George, IV, ’03 (D). Dyer and Bleacher, Monument Mills, Housa- 
tonic, Mass. 

Nary, James Anthony, II, ’22 (D). Manager, United States Testing Company, 
Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Nelson, Roy Clayton, II, ’21 (C). Technical Superintendent, Assabet Mills, 
Maynard, Mass. 

Nelson, Russell Sprague, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). With Draper Corporation, Hopedale, 
Mass. 

Neugroschl, Sigmond Israel, I, ’21 (D). 

Newall, J. Douglas, IV, ’09 (D). Superintendent, Bondsville Bleachery & Dye 
Works, Bondsville, Mass. 

Newcomb, Guy Houghton, IV, ’06 (C). Manager, Philadelphia Office, E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours & Co., 128 South Front Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Neyman, Julius Ellis, IV, ’15 (B.T.D.). Furniture Dealer, Neyman Furniture 
Company, 193-199 Middlesex Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Nichols, Raymond Elmore, VI, ’10 (D). Draftsman, H. E. Fletcher Company, 
West Chelmsford, Mass. 

Niven, Robert Scott, VI, ’12 (D). Draftsman, General Electric Company, Lynn, 
Mass. 

Nostrand, Mrs. William L. (Conklin, Jennie Grace), Illb, ’05 (C). 

O’Brien, Philip Francis, II, ’15 (D). (B.S. New York University, M.A. 

Fordham University.) Chairman, Textile Department, Textile High 
School, New York City. 

O’Connell, Clarence Edward, IV, ’ll (D). Dyer, National Aniline and Chemi- 
cal Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 

O’Connor, Lawrence Dennis, VI, ’17 (D). With Beggs & Cobb, Winchester, 
Mass 

O’Donneil, John Delaney, I, ’04 (C). 

O’Hara, William Francis, IV, ’04 (C). 

Olson, Carl Oscar, II, ’24 (D). Scheduling Department, Cheney Brothers, South 
Manchester, Conn. 


84 

Orlauski, Anthony, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Textile Dyer, Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Orr, Andrew Stewart, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Manager, Storey & Co., Brockton, Mass. 

Osborne, George Gordon, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). (M. Sc. 1932, North Carolina 
State College.) Senior Research Fellow, The Textile Foundation, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Othote, Louis Joseph, I, ’23 (D). Salesman and Technician, Haywood, Mackay 
& Valentine, Inc., 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Palais, Samuel, IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). Purchasing Agent, Durrell Company, Gardner, 
Mass. 

Parigian, Harold Hrant, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Archer Rubber Company, 
Milford, Mass. 

Parker, Everett Nichols, I, ’05 (D). President, Parker Spool and Bobbin Com- 
pany, 27-53 Middle Street, Lewiston, Maine. 

Parker, Mrs. Herbert L. (Meek, Lotta L.), Illb, ’07 (C). 4 Brookside Circle 
Auburn, Maine. 

Parker, Hubert Frederic, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Engineer, New York & Pennsyl- 
vania Co., and Castanea Paper Company, Lock Haven, Pa. 

Parker, John George, Jr., IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chelmsford, Mass. 

Parkin, Robert Wilson, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). With Limerick Yarn Mills, Limerick, 
Me. 

Parkis, William Lawton, I, ’09 (D). 32 Summit Street, South Manchester, 
Conn. 

Parsons, Charles Sumner, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). With Hathaway Manufacturing 
Company, New Bedford, Mass. 

Peabody, Roger Merrill, II, ’16 (D). 

Pearlstein, Maxwell, III, ’28 (D). 37 Lawrence Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. 

Pearson, Alfred Henry, IV, ’ll (D). Salesman, Ciba Company, Inc., 93 Broad 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

Peary, John Ervin, III, ’31 (D). Assistant Designer, Pepperell Manufacturing 
Company, Biddeford, Me. 

Pease, Chester Chapin, I, ’09 (D). Agent, Columbian Mills (Otis Company), 
Greenville, N. H. 

Peck, Carroll Wilmot, IV, ’13 (D). Vice-President, George Mann & Co., Inc., 
Providence, R. I. 

Penney, Cabot William, III, ’33 (D). Night Superintendent, Wyandotte 
Worsted Company, Rochester, N. H. 

Pensel, George Robert, IV, ’13 (B.T.D.). Vice-President, Ritter Chemical 
Company, Inc., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Perkins, John Edward, III, ’00 (D). 24 Abbott Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Perkins, J. Dean, III, ’08 (D). Special Agent, Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Perlman, Samuel, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). 

Perlmuter, Barney Harold, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Treasurer, Mallon Mattress 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Pero, Richard Omer, II, ’31 (D). Farnsworth Company, Lisbon Center, Maine. 

Peterson, Eric Arthur, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chelmsford, Mass. 

Petty, George Edward, I, ’03 (C). 211 Ashe Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

Phaneuf, Maurice Philippe, III, ’20 (D). 122 Concord Street, Nashua, N. H. 

Phelan, Bernard Michael, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, National Aniline 
and Chemical Co., 351 Abbott Road, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Pierce, George Whitwell, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Superintendent of Dyeing and 
Finishing, Kramer Hosiery Company, Nazareth, Pa. 

Piligian, Hiag Nishan, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Bay State Thread 
Works, Springfield, Mass. 

Pillsbury, Ray Charles, I, ’13 (D). Manager, Project Department, Cheney 
Brothers, Manchester, Conn. 

Pizzuto, Joseph James, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 65 Circular Avenue, Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

Plaisted, Webster E., II, ’18 (D). Superintendent of Woolens, Pacific Mills, 
(Worsted Division), Lawrence, Mass. 


85 

Potter, Carl Howard, I, ’09 (D). Treasurer and Manager, Lola Manufacturing 
Company, Stanley, N. C. 

Pottinger, James Gilbert, II, ’12 (D). Director and General Purchasing Agent, 
Reliance Manufacturing Company, 212 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Powers, Walter Wellington, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Assistant Works Manager, 
Fiberloid Corporation, Springfield, Mass. 

Pradel, Alois Joseph, III, ’00 (D). Designer, Killingly Worsted Company, 
Danielson, Conn. 

Pradel, Mrs. Alois J. (Walker, Anna G.), Illb, ’03 (C). 78 Broad Street, 
Danielson, Conn. 

Precourt, Joseph Octave, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Chicago District Manager, Janvary 
& Wood Co. (Maysville Cotton Mills), 437 West Ontario Street, Chicago, 111. 

Prescott, Walker Flanders, IV, ’09 (D). Manager, Prescott & Co., Reg’d, 
774 Saint Paul Street, West, Montreal, Can. 

Preston, Harold Lawrence, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Salesman, York Ice Machinery 
Corporation, Boston, Mass. 

Prince, Sylvanus Cushing, VI, ’08 (D). 

Proctor, Braman, IV, ’08 (D). Dyestuffs Salesman, General Dyestuff Corpora- 
tion, 159 High Street, Boston, Mass. 

Putnam, George Ives, IV, ’16 (B.T.D.). Southern Manager, Rome Soap 
Manufacturing Co., Rome, N. Y. 

Putnam, Leverett Nelson, IV, ’10 (D). Dyer, Pacific Mills (Worsted Division), 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Putnam, Philip Clayton, IV, ’13 (D). Foreman Dyer, Apponaug Company, 
Apponaug, R. I. 

Quigley, Gerald Francis, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Bradford Hat Corporation, 
Haverhill Alass 

Quinlan, William Harold, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). 171 Highland Street, Worcester, 
Mass. 

Radford, Garland, II, ’20 (D). Vice-President, Oriental Textile Mills, Houston, 
Texas. 

Ramsdell, Theodore Ellis, I, ’02 (D). Cotton Manufacturer, Monument Mills, 
Housatonic, Mass. 

Rawlinson, Richard William, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.) Research Engineer, Nashua 
Manufacturing Company (Suffolk Mills), Lowell, Mass. 

Raymond, Charles Abel, IV, ’07 (D). Essex, Mass. 

Recher, Theodore, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.) . Development Division, Lastex Department, 
United States Rubber Company, Providence, R. I. 

Redding, Leslie Capron, II, ’26 (D). Assistant Designer, Dunn Worsted Mills, 
Woonsocket, R. I. 

Reed, Norman Bagnell, I, ’10 (D). President and Treasurer, Lowell Mills Com- 
pany, Lowell, Mass. 

Reinhold, Kurt Herman, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Statistician, Russell Manufacturing 
Company, Middletown, Conn. 

Reynolds, Fred Bartlett, II, ’08 (D). Purchasing Agent, M. T. Stevens & Sons 
Company, North Andover, Mass. 

Reynolds, Isabel Halliday, III, ’03 (C). Clerk, Pacific Mills Print Works, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Reynolds, Raymond, II, ’24 (D). Supervisor, DuPont Rayon Company, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rice, Josiah Alfred, Jr., Ill, ’20 (D). Manager, Wholesale Ginghams & Wool 
Goods, Marshall Field & Co., Chicago, 111. 

Rice, Kenneth Earl, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). With Sidney Blumenthal & Co., Shelton 
Looms, Shelton, Conn. 

Rich, Edward, IV, ’15 (B.T.D.). Manager, Jackson Caldwell Company, East 
Boston, Mass. 

Rich, Everett Blaine, III, ’ll (D). “Onacove,” Sewall Road, Wolfeboro, N. H. 

Rich, Milton Scott, II, ’22 (D). Assistant Purchasing Agent, Harvard Univer- 
sity, Cambridge, Mass. 


8G 

Richardson, George Oliver, IV, ’16 (B.T.D.). Resident Manager, National 
Aniline and Chemical Company of America, Tienstin, China. 

Richardson, Richardson Perry, I, ’13 (D). Salesman, H. F. Livermore Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

Riggs, Homer Chase, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). President, Riggs & Lombard, Inc., 
Lowell, Mass. 

Ripley, George Keyes, II, ’17 (D). Manufacturer of Textiles, Troy Blanket 
Mills, Troy, N. H. 

Rivers, William Anthony, II, ’24 (D). Resident Agent, Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company, Woodstock, Vt. 

Robbins, Walter Archibald, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). With Columbia Mills, Inc., 
Minetto, N. Y. 

Roberson, Pat Howell, I, ’05 (C). Vice-President, Union State Bank, Pell City, 
Ala. 

Roberts, Carrie Isabel, Illb, ’05 (C). Craft Work, 37 Grace Street, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Robillard, Gerald Adelbert, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 889 Moody Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Robinson, Ernest Warren, IV, ’08 (D). Director of Thread & Yarn Mills, Col- 
lingbourne Mills, Inc., Elgin, 111. 

Robinson, Russell, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Overseer, Manville-Jenckes Corporation, 
Manville, R. I. 

Robinson, William Albert, II, ’25 (D). Explorer and author. On expedition 
to the Galapagos Islands. 

Robinson, William Carleton, III, ’03 (C). With Durands Shoe Company, 
Auburn, Maine. 

Robson, Frederick William Charles, IV, ’10 (D). 

Rodalvicz, Francis Rudolph, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Woolen 
Company, Andover, Mass. 

Royal, Louis Merry, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Instructor of Mathematics, Pawtucket 
Senior High School, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Rundlett, Arnold Dearborn, VI, ’12 (D). Superintendent, Joseph Noone’s 
Sons Company, Peterborough, N. H. 

Runnells, Harold Nelson, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). 32 Franklin Street, Concord, N. H. 

Russell, Harold William, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). With Goodall Worsted Company, 
Sanford, Me. 

Russell, John William, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Lanolin Corpora- 
tion, Lawrence, Mass. 

Russell, William Samuel, Jr., VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Foreman, Johns-Manville 
Corporation, Manville, N. J. 

Ryan, David Louis, II, ’27 (D). Silk Salesman, Duplan Silk Corporation, 1450 
Broadway, New York City. 

Ryan, Lawrence Francis, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Chemist, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
& Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del. 

Ryan, Millard Kenneth Thomas, Jr., II, ’24 (D). Textile Adviser, Kwantung 
Provincial Government, Canton, China. 

Ryberg, Bertil August, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Research Chemist, American Associa- 
tion of Textile Chemists and Colorists, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Sadler, Thomas Sheridan, II, ’30 (D). Construction Work, Massachusetts 
State Infirmary, Tewksbury, Mass. 

Sampson, Clifford William, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Eastern Manager, Twitchell 
Process Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, 180 Pawtucket Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Sanborn, Frank Morrison, VI, ’19 (B.T.E.). Assistant Superintendent, Ameri- 
can Net & Twine Co., West Kennebunk, Maine. 

Sanborn, Ralph Lyford, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). Head of Cost, Production and Time- 
keeping Department, Manville-Jenckes Company, Gastonia, N. C. 

Sandlund, Carl Seth, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Research, Propper-McCallum Hosiery 
Company, Northampton, Mass. 

Sargent, Robert Edward, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Tubize Chatillon Corpora- 
tion, 2 Park Avenue, New York City. 

Sargent, Walter Ambrose, I, ’22 (D). Instructor, Textile Shop Practice, Board 
of Education, Passaic, N. J. 

Saunders, Harold Fairbairn, IV, ’09 (D). 301 West 8th St., Coffeville, Kans. 


87 

Savard, Aime Albert, Jr., IV, *33 (B.T.C.). With Lawrence Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Savery, James Bryan, II, ’23 (D). Assistant Sales Manager, Philgas Company, 
Windsor, Conn. 

Sawyer, Henry Severance, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). With Sawyer, Regan Company, 
Dalton, Mass. 

Sawyer, Richard Morey, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). (M.S., 1929, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology.) Cost Engineer, Firestone Cotton Mills, New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Scanlon, Andrew Augustine, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). 

Schaetzel, Andre Paul, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Associated Dyeing & Print- 
ing Corporation, Paterson, N. J. 

Schneiderman, Jacob, III, ’27 (D). Golf Professional, Fairview Country Club, 
Cumberland Center, Maine. 

Schreiter, Ehrich Ernest Max, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Assistant to New England 
Industrial Manager, Tide Water Oil Company, Boston, Mass. 

Schwarz, Herman Louis, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Color Chemist, Sandoz Chemical 
Works, Inc., 61 Van Dam Street, New York City. 

Scott, Gordon Maxwell, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). 

Shaber, Hyman Jesse, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.) (M.B.A., 1922, Harvard University.) 

With Spencer Chain Stores, Boston, Mass. 

Shanahan, James Edward, II, ’22 (D). Manager, Hygeia Ice & Coal Company, 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Shananquet, Mrs. Lee (Woodies, Ida A.), Illb, ’00 (C). Occupational Thera- 
pist, Sunshine Sanatorium, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Shea, Francis James, II, ’12 (D). 98 Pine Street, Florence, Mass. 

Shea, John Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Buffalo Electro-Chemical Co., 
Inc., 72 Granite Street, Boston, Mass. 

Shedd, Jackson Ambrose, III, ’28 (D). Designer, Lincolnfield Mill, Inc., 
Lincoln, Maine. 

Shelton, Charles Leopold, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.) . Assistant to Merchandising Man- 
ager, Mohawk Carpet Mills, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Shenker, Nahman, III, ’25 (D). 

Sidebottom, Leon William, IV, ’ll (D). Chemist, Boston Blacking & Chemical 
Company, East Cambridge, Mass. 

Sjostrom, Carl Gustof Verner, Jr., Ill, ’17 (D). 

Slamin, Alfred Francis, I, ’26 (D). Representative, Benjamin Franklin Paint 
Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sleeper, Robert Reid, IV, ’00 (D). Textile Colorist, Calco Chemical Company, 
Bound Brook, N. J. 

Smith, Allen Batterman, I, ’26 (D). Head of Mill Department, Turner Halsey 
Company, 74 Leonard Street, New York City. 

Smith, Doane White, II, ’10 (D). 15 Oakland Street, Natick, Mass. 

Smith, Frank Kenfield, II, ’24 (D). Designer Technician, Grout’s, Ltd., St. 
Catharines, Ont. 

Smith, Herbert Jeffers, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Overseer of Ring Spinning, Potter 
Fine Spinners, Inc., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Smith, Ralston Fox, I, ’04 (C). Sales Manager, W. H. Warner & Co., 1708 Union 
Trust Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Smith, Roger Dennis, II, ’27 (D). With Marland Mills, Andover, Mass. 

Smith, Theophilus Gilman, Jr., IV, ’10 (D). Farming, Groton, Mass. 

Smith, William Charles, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Research Associate, American Asso- 
ciation of Textile Chemists & Colorists, Bureau of Standards, Washington, 
D. C. 

Snelling, Fred Newman, II, ’03 (D). With the American Railway Express 
Company, Haverhill, Mass. 

Sokolsky, Henry, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). Time Study Supervisor, B. F. Sturtevant 
Company, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Somers, Benjamin, II, ’25 (D). 128 Pleasant Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Southwick, Charles Hudson, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Slatersville 
Finishing Company, Slatersville, R. I. 

Spalding, Arthur Ovila, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 84 D Street, Lowell, Mass. 


88 

Spiegel, Edward, II, ’03 (C). 647 West 169th Street, New York City. 

Stacey, Alfred Charles, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 9 Brook Street, Andover, Mass. 

Standish, John Carver, IV, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Albany Felt Company. 
Albany, N. Y. 

Stanley, John Prince, Jr., IV, ’29 (B.T.C.)* Chemist and Overseer of Bleach- 
ing, Certified Laboratories, Inc., Austin, Texas. 

Stass, John George, II, ’27 (D). Textile Analyst, United States Testing Com- 
pany, Inc., 1415 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. 

Stearns, Kenneth Lawrence, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 41 Grace Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Steele, Everette Vernon, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Purchasing Agent, Rohm & Haas 
Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stephens, Arnold George, I, ’29 (D). 34 Fremont Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Stevens, Dexter, I, ’04 (D). Vice-President, Utica & Mohawk Cotton Mills, 
Inc., Utica, N. Y. 

Stevens, Raymond Russell, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). Overseer of Dyeing, The Felters 
Company, Inc., Millbury, Mass. 

Stevenson, Murray Reid, III, ’03 (C). 

Stewart, Alexander, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). 134 Main Street, Andover, Mass. 

Stewart, Arthur Andrew, II, ’00 (D). Professor of Textiles; in charge of Fin- 
ishing Department, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Stewart, John Weeden, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, General Dyestuff 
Corporation, 230 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Stewart, Walter Lawrence, III, ’03 (D). 

Stiegler, Harold Winfred, IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). (M.S., 1922, Ph.D., 1924, North- 
western University.) Research Work, Rohm & Haas Co., Bristol, Pa. 

Stohn, Alexander Charles, III, ’06 (C). General Superintendent, Carl Stohn, 
Inc., Hyde Park, Mass. 

Stone, Ira Aaron, IV, ’09 (D). Vice-President, Royal Manufacturing Company, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Storer, Francis Everett, II, ’07 (D). President, Thames Bank and Trust Co., 
Norwich, Conn. 

Storey, Alvin Briggs, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Assistant Textile Superintendent, 
Celanese Corporation of America, Cumberland, Md. 

Stott, John Smith, III, ’28 (D). 10 Robinson Court, North Andover, Mass. 

Stronach, Irving Nichols, IV, ’10 (D). Superintendent, Hampton Company, 
Easthampton, Mass. 

S trout, Kenneth Edward, III, ’28 (D). Designer, American Mills Company, 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Sturtevant, Albert William, IV, ’17 (D). Automobile Mechanic, Lowell Motor 
Sales, Inc., Lowell, Mass. 

Sturtevant, Fred William, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Better Fabrics Testing 
Bureau, Room 1010, 461 8th Avenue, New York City. 

Suhlke, Waldo Eric, IV, *20 (B.T.C.). Teacher, Jefferson Junior High School, 
Meriden, Conn. 

Sullivan, John David, VI, ’12 (D). With Robert Gair Company, Bradford, Mass. 

Sullivan, Lambert William, II, ’23 (D). With Southwell Wool Combing 
Company (Silesia Mills), North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Sullivan, Willard David, II, ’23 (D). 39 Loring Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Sunbury, Herbert Ellsworth, VI, ’18 (B.T.E.). Mill Superintendent, Allbestos 
Corporation, 21st & Godfrey Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sutcliffe, Henry Mundell, II, ’25 (D). Overseer, Uxbridge Worsted Company 
(Granite Mills), Pascoag, R. I. 

Sutton, Leslie Emans, I, ’17 (D). Superintendent, Anniston Cordage Company, 
Anniston, Ala. 

Swain, Harry LeRoy, Jr., I, ’26 (D). Manager, Cotton and Fabric Laboratory, 
Cotton Mill, New Bedford, Mass. 

Swan, Guy Carleton, II, ’06 (D). Chemist in charge, Import Division, United 
States Department of Agriculture, 201 Varick Street, New York City. 

Swanson, John Harold, I, ’28 (D). Designer, Georgia Kincaid Mills, Experi- 
ment, Ga. 

Sweeney, George Hamilton, II, *24 (D). Salesman, Walker Stetson Company, 
157 Essex Street, Boston, Mass. 


89 

Swift, Edward Spooner, S. J., I, ’02 (D). Clergyman, Church of the Immacu- 
late Conception, Boston, Mass. 

Syme, James Francis, II, ’00 (D). Industrial Management, 27 Linnaean Street, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Symmes, Dean Whiting, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.) Salesman and Demonstrator, Na- 
tional Aniline and Chemical Company, 150 Causeway Street, Boston, Mass. 

Tamulonis, Edward William, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Time Study, Newmarket 
Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Tang, Hsiung-Yuan, I, ’30 (D). Assistant Manager, Sung Sing Cotton Mill, 
No. 3, Wusih, Kiangsu, China. 

Tarpey, Thomas Joseph, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.)* Chemist, National Aniline and 
Chemical Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Tarshis, Elias Aaron, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Head Dyer, Pohatcong Hosiery Mills, 
Washington, N. J. 

Teague, Charles Baird, II, ’26 (D). Civil Engineer, Highway Division, Massa- 
chusetts Public Works Department, Boston, Mass. 

Thaxter, Joseph Blake, Jr., II, ’12 (D). Vice-President, Ludlow Sales Corpora- 
tion, 80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Thomas, Roland Vincent, I, *05 (C). 

Thompson, Arthur Robert, Jr., IV, *22 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Ciba Company, 
Inc., 829 Providence Road, Charlotte, N. C. 

Thompson, Everett Leander, I, *05 (D). Salesman, Tropical Paint and Oil Co., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Thompson, Henry James, IV, *00 (D). 15 Greenleaf Street, Malden, Mass. 

Todd, Walter Ernest, III, *23 (D). Superintendent, Stanley Woolen Company, 
Uxbridge, Mass. 

Toepler, Carl, IV, *22 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Bellman Brook Bleachery Company, 
Fairview, N. J. 

Toher, Francis Luke, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 58 Concord Street, Providence, R. I. 

Topjian, Leon, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 

Toshach, Reginald Alexander, II, ’ll (D). 721 Broadway, Haverhill, Mass. 

Toupin, Stephane Frederick, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). 

True, William Clifford, II, ’22 (D). Industrial Engineer, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 
Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Turcotte, David Henry, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 523 Fletcher Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Tyler, Lauriston Whitcombe, II, ’16 (D). Manager, W. T. Grant Company, 
Medford, Mass. 

Valentine, Burnet, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Department Manager, Pepperell Manu- 
facturing Company, 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Varnum, Arthur Clayton, II, ’06 (D). Superintendent, Troy Blanket Mills, 
Troy, N. H. 

Villa, Luis Jorge, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Automobile Dealer, Hijos de Vicente, B. 
Villa & Co., Medellin, Colombia, S. A. 

Villa, William Horace, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Compania Colom- 
biana de Tejidos, Medellin, Colombia, S. A. 

Villeneuve, Maurice Arthur, II, ’26 (D). With Killingly Worsted Mills, Daniel- 
son, Conn. 

Vincent, William Henry, III, ’26 (D). 

Walen, Ernest Dean, VI, ’14 (B.T.E.). General Manager, Pacific Mills (Worsted 
Division), Lawrence, Mass. 

Walker, Alfred Schuyler, II, ’ll (D). 67 Park Avenue, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Walker, Anna Gertrude, Illb, *03 (C). See Pradel, Mrs. Alois J. 

Walker, Raymond Scott, II, ’23 (D). Engineer, Wood Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Walker, Samuel J., IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 334 Ridgeway Avenue, East Liverpool, 
Ohio. 

Wallace, Joseph Max, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). With Textile Dyeing Company of 
America, Hawthorne, N. J. 

Wang, Chen, IV, ’23 (B. T. C.). 

Wang, Cho, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 


90 

Wang, Tung Chuan, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Wang, Yun-Cheng, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). 

Wang, Yung Chi, II, ’21 (D). Factory Manager, Ching Yuen Silk Mill, Shanghai, 
China. 

Ward, George Chester, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Research Chemist, Celanese Corpora- 
tion of America, Cumberland, Md. 

Warren, E. Maybelle, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Hub Hosiery Company, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Warren, Philip Hamilton, II, ’05 (D). Superintendent, Hopeville Manufactur- 
ing Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Washburn, John Milton, Jr., IV, ’21 (B.T.C.) . Sales Promotion Department, 
New England Laundries, Inc., Somerville, Mass. 

Watson, William, III, ’ll (D). Real Estate, 50-54 Merrimack Street, Haver- 
hill, Mass. 

Webber, Arthur Hammond, IV, ’01 (D). Chemist and Colorist, L. B. South- 

wick & Co., Peabody, Mass. 

Webster, Joseph Albert, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Superintendent, Cloth Division, 
Aberfoyle Manufacturing Company, Chester, Pa. 

Weinstein, Edward Joseph, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Harrison Hardware Company, 
Harrison, N. Y. 

Wells, Ai Edwin, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Wells, Henry Alfred, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Manager, Warwick Print Works, 
Inc., Bound Brook, N. J. 

Westaway, John Chester, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). With W. J. Westaway Co., Ltd., 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Westbrooke, Clayton Colling ton, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Bigelow-Sanford 
Carpet Company, Thompsonville, Conn. 

Wetherbee, Francis Putney, I, ’28 (D). Plant Manager, Flint River Cotton 
Mills, Albany, Ga. 

Wheaton, Walter Francis, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Owner of Stationery Department, 
Genung & Leeney, Inc., White Plains, N. Y. 

Wheelock, Stanley Herbert, II, ’05 (D). President and Treasurer, Stanley 
Woolen Company, Uxbridge, Mass. 

Whitcomb, Roscoe Myron, IV, ’10 (D). Pharmacist, R. M. Whitcomb, Ash- 
land, N. H. 

White, Royal Phillip, II, ’04 (D). Agent, Stirling Mills, Lowell, Mass. 

Whitehill, Warren Hall, IV, ’12 (D). Textile Chemist, Talbot Mills, North 
Billerica, Mass. 

Wiech, Raymond Edward, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Assistant Chemist, United Mer- 
chants & Manufacturers Management Corporation, 377 Broadway, New York 
City. 

Wightman, William Henry, IV, ’06 (D). Salesman, Ciba Company, Inc., 
157 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Wilcox, Leonard Edward, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). With Gofkauf’s Stores, Inc., 
Lowell, Mass. 

Williams, Albert William, III, ’32 (D). 17 Belle Avenue, Lowell, Mass. 

Williamson, Douglas Franklin, I, ’22 (D). Superintendent, The Linen Thread 
Company, Inc., Blue Mountain, Ala. 

Wilman, Rodney Bernhardt, II, ’25 (D). Superintendent, New England Fibre 
Blanket Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Wing, Charles True, III, ’02 (D). Paymaster, Merrimack Woolen Corporation, 
Dracut, Mass. 

Wingate, Edward Lawrence, Jr., VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Service Manager, Russell 
Manufacturing Company, Middletown, Conn. 

Wingate, William Henry, IV, ’08 (D). Superintendent, Hodges Finishing Com- 
pany, Dedham, Mass. 

Wise, Paul Tower, II, ’01 (D). Vice-President, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 1155 Man- 
hattan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wojas, Stanley Edward, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Assistant Chemist, Massachusetts 
Mohair Plush Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Woo, Tsunkwei, VI, ’19 (B.T.E.). 


91 

Wood, Ernest Hadley, S.B., IV, ’ll (D). 

Wood, James Carleton, IV, ’09 (D). Sales Representative, R. T. Vanderbilt 
Company, New York City. 

Wood, Lawrence Burnham, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Pacific Print Works, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Woodbury, Kenneth Leroy, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Cost Finding and Production 
Engineering, The American Mills Company, New Haven, Conn. 

Woodcock, Eugene Close, II, ’07 (D). Mill Agent, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 1155 
Manhattan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Woodhead, Joseph Arthur, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Sales Department, Hess, Gold- 
smith & Co., Inc., New York City. 

Woodies, Ida Alberta, Illb, ’00 (C). See Shananquet, Mrs. Lee. 

Woodman, Harry Lincoln, I, ’02 (C). Assistant Superintendent, Construction, 
Merrimac Chemical Company, Woburn, Mass. 

Woodruff, Charles Beauregard, I, ’06 (C). 

Worthen, Clifford Tasker, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.) . Overseer, Dyeing and Bleaching, 
McLoughlin Textile Corporation, 203 Park Avenue, Utica, N. Y. 

Wotkowicz, Michael Joseph, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). 

Wright, Edward, II, ’05 (C). Sanitary Engineer, Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health, 141 State House, Boston, Mass. 

Wu, Clarence Wen-Lon, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). 

Wu, Tsung-Chieh, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). 

Yavner, Harry, II, ’12 (D). Merchant, Mayo’s Hardware Company, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Young, Edmund Joseph, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Puritan Company, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Yung, E-Zung, I, ’32 (D). Personal Secretary to Manager, Sung Sing Cotton 
Mill No. 3, Wusih, Kiangsu, China. 

Zalkind, Benjamin Joseph, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Saco-Lowell 
Shops, Boston, Mass. 

Ziock, LeRoy, II, ’25 (D). Agent and Superintendent, Aurora Woolen Mills, 
Aurora, 111. 

Zisman, Louis Samuel, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Head of Dyeing Department and 
Chief Chemist, Gotham Silk Hosiery Company, Inc., 580 First Avenue, New 
York City. 




LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

THIS SHOULD BE FILLED OUT AND SENT TO THE REGISTRAR 


Date 


Name in Full 


Date and Place of Birth 


Home Address i 


City or Town 


Street and Number 


State 


INDICATE COURSE DESIRED 


DEGREE COURSES 

DIPLOMA COURSES 

IV. 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

I. 

Cotton Manufacturing 

VI. 

Textile Engineering 

II. 

Wool Manufacturing 


1. General Course 

2. Cotton Option 

3. Wool Option 

4. Design Option 

5. Sales Option 

III. 

Textile Design 


Graduate of High School, Year 193 

Other High or Preparatory Schools attended 

If you have done collegiate work, give name and address of college or 
university 193 . . . — 193 . . . 


Signature 

Signatures of 

Parents or 

Guardian 

Citizen of 

City or Town State 









SERIES 37, No. 4 


May, 1934 


BULLETIN 

OF THE 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1934 


Entered August 26, 1912, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized on August 15, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2500. 6-’34 Order 1648. 


A STUDY OF THE CAUSE OF THE NUMBER OF OPERATIONS USED IN 

WORSTED DRAWING. 

By John C. Lowe, B.T.E., Assistant Professor of Textiles 

The object of this paper is to present the nature, extent, and results of two theses 
which have been prepared under the direction of Professor Herbert J. Ball, in 
charge of the Textile Engineering Department. The material for Experiment 1 
is selected from the undergraduate thesis by E. L. Wingate, B.T.E. 1928, and 
that for Experiment 2 is from the undergraduate thesis by John C. Lowe, B.T.E. 
1934. Both theses were a partial requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Textile 
Engineering. 

The purpose of both theses was to investigate the influence which an increase 
in the weight of the end after the Noble comb has upon the number of operations 
necessary to produce roving from comb sliver. 

The theory involved is outlined in three considerations : 

(1) Increasing the size of the end after it leaves the Noble comb increases the 
effective draft necessary to obtain the required reduction of the top to roving. 

(2) The effective draft controls the number of doublings necessary to maintain 
evenness. Fewer doublings are required when the effective draft is reduced. 

(3) The number of operations required to produce a satisfactory roving is 
governed by the effective draft necessary to obtain the required reduction from 
top to roving. 

Effective draft is that part of the draft which causes the reduction in the size 
of the end delivered as compared to the size of the end entering the machine. 
Draft is not effective when its action upon reduction is neutralized by doublings. 

Draft applied in successive operations to a single end will produce unevenness. 
It will be found that, in general, using no doublings approximately three operations 
will be required to reduce top to roving. This suggests that all operations exceeding 
three are made necessary by the doublings used to maintain evenness. It follows 
that if a lighter ounce top were used the total reduction, from top to roving, would 
be lessened, unevenness due to drafting would be reduced, and, therefore, fewer 
operations would be necessary to produce roving from it. The maximum benefit 
should be obtained when an increase in the weight of the end from the Noble 
comb is avoided in any of the following operations. 

To test the theory, two 2/32 yarns were processed in Experiment 1 from 
blood wool, and in Experiment 2 three 2/36 yarns were processed from % a blood 
recarded waste. The stock used in Experiment 1 was obtained from a mill in the 
form of Noble comb sliver, and came from four combs. 

Figure 1 presents a comparison of the three routines followed for Yarns 1, 2, and 3 
in Experiment 2. Routine 1 with the additional operation of fine drawing fol- 
lowing the weigh box, and Routine 3 were used for Yarns 1 and 3, respectively, in 
Experiment 1. 

Figure 2 shows graphically the changes in the weight of the end throughout each 
routine of Experiment 2. Plots A and B also fairly represent similar changes for 
Yarns 1 and 3 in Experiment 1, respectively. The horizontal line D, representing 
the weight of the end from the comb, intersects Plots A and C, indicating that for 
Yarn 1 six operations have been used before an actual reduction in weight is 
obtained. Thus practice considers that these six operations, with an enormous 
number of doublings, are required to make the end from the Noble comb fit to be 
reduced to roving, with nothing accomplished beyond blending, and evening. 

2 


These yarns were woven into cloth, and finished, care being taken to avoid any 
variations in processing so that any differences revealed in subsequent tests would 
be due to the different yarn routines only. 

To measure the physical properties the ply yarns were tested for yarn number 
or counts, turns per inch, breaking strength, both single strand and skein, and 
elongation. The fabrics were tested for breaking strength, using the strip test 
for Experiment 1 and the grab test for Experiment 2. The weight per square yard, 
the weight per linear yard, and the ends and the picks per inch were also determined. 

All tests were made under atmospheric conditions of 65% R.H. and temperatures 
ranging between 70° to 79.5° F., and after exposure of the samples for at least 
four hours to the same atmosphere. 

Due to differences existing in yarn number, and turns per inch, the actual 
strength test results could not be fairly compared. Within small limits the strength 
of a yarn varies indirectly as the count, and directly as the turns per inch. The 
same is also true for the strength of a fabric with the additional variable of ends 
per inch — warp and filling. 

To obtain comparison factors (C.F.) two conversion formulas were used: 

(1) Mean breaking strength x Mean yarn no. 

Mean turns = C - F - for y arns 

(2) Mean breaking strength x Mean yarn no . 

Mean turns x Mean ends per tested width ~~ * * or a ncs 

For reference, a Summary is presented on Page 4 which contains most of the 
important data and lists the actual results of tests, which may thus be compared 
where necessary with the comparison factor ratios. 

Comparison charts, Figures 3 and 4, are constructed from comparison factors 
for strength tests of both yarns and fabrics, and from actual results for elongation. 
To facilitate comparisons, it is to be noted that for all strength and elongation tests 
Routine 1 or Yarn 1 equals 100, and for comparison of the submean to the mean, 
the mean equals 100. 

In addition to the physical tests, both yarns and fabrics were examined by many 
mill executives. Their opinions follow. 

Yarns: Exp. 1 — There is very little difference if any between the two yarns in 
evenness. Yarn 3 is preferred for its elasticity. 

Exp. 2 — The consensus of opinion favored Yarn 3 as being the most 
even and most elastic. A few preferred Yarn 2, but none selected Yarn 1 
as being the best. 

Fabrics: Exp. 1 — The advantage is with Fabric 3 which has a better handle than 
Fabric 1. There is no choice as regards the general evenness. 

Exp. 2 — Decision was difficult. Fabric 1 was eliminated in the grey 
and finally Fabric 3 was selected as the best with Fabric 2 very close. 
For the finished fabrics there was not a unanimous opinion, except on one 
point, namely, that both Fabrics 2 and 3 are superior in elasticity. 

The deductions to be made both from the actual examinations and the results 
of the comparative studies are as follows: 

(1) Excessive processing seems to affect the physical properties of the fibre thus 
reducing both the strength and elasticity of the yarn, for in both experiments the 
ordinary yarn is inferior both in strength and elasticity. 

3 


(2) The superiority in strength of Yarn 2 over that of Yarn 3 in Experiment 2 
is wholly due to (a) the use of one intersecting gilling process instead of two ordinary 
gill boxes, and (b) the increase in the weight of the end after it left the Noble comb 
for Yarn 3. Therefore intelligent use of the intersecting gill box should lead to a 
reduction in the number of operations required to reduce top to roving for any 
system of worsted drawing. 

(3) Both experiments support the soundness of the theory that an avoidance of 
an increase in the weight of the end after it leaves the Noble comb would reduce 
the number of operations necessary to produce a satisfactory yarn, for in neither 
yarn nor fabric are the yarns processed by Routine 1 — ordinary procedure — 
superior to the yarns produced by Routines 2 and 3. 

SUMMARY 


Experiment No. 1 Experiment No. 2 


YARN DATA 


#1 

#3 

n 

#2 

#3 

Total doublings 


576,000 

2304 

1,198,080 

1536 

6912 

Ratio of doublings . 


250 

1 

780 

1 

4.5 

Total operations 


11 

7 

10 

6 

7 

Effective draft 


186 

58 

165 

40 

80 

Total draft .... 


63,600,000 

84,520 

45,980,000 

57,400 

279,936 

Mean yarn number 


2/31.5 

2/31.7 

2/34.6 

2/36.2 

2/34.3 

Mean turns per inch 


12.3 

12.0 

13.2 

12.1 

13.2 

Single strand tests — ply 

Mean breaking strength — grams 


353 

356 

232 

237 

248 

Mean elongation — % 


13.5 

13.9 

10.8 

11.7 

11.6 

Skein tests — ply 

Mean breaking strength — lbs. 

FABRIC DATA 


105.9 107.2 

Strip Tests 

95.0 90.0 

Grab Tests 

95.1 

Ounces per square yard . 


5.41 

5.16 

7.82 

7.85 

8.4 

Ounces per yard — 54" wide . 


8.12 

7.74 

11.73 

11.78 

12.6 

Mean breaking strength — lbs. 

Grey — warp 


41.2 

41.4 

121.3 

119.5 

129.2 

Grey — filling 


34.4 

34.8 

54.8 

61.5 

59.0 

Finished — warp 


48.6 

48.0 

102.1 

101.2 

109.6 

Finished — filling 

COMPARISON FACTOR RATIOS 

32.8 

33.4 

40.6 

40.0 

41.8 

Single strand breaking strength 


1.00 

1.04 

1.00 

1.16 

1.06 

Skein breaking strength . 


1.00 

1.05 

1.00 

1.08 

0.99 

Grey — warp breaking strength 


1.00 

1.06 

1.00 

1.12 

1.08 

Grey — filling breaking strength 


1.00 

1.05 

1.00 

1.12 

1.06 

Finished — warp brk. str. 


1.00 

0.99 

1.00 

1.13 

1.05 

Finished — filling brk. str. 


1.00 

1.05 

1.00 

1.07 

1.04 


4 


OPERATIONS USED IN YARN MANUFACTURE 



Figure 1 


5 



6 









Figure 4 


8 








SERIES 36. NO. 1. 


August , 1934 


BULLETIN 

of the 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1934-1935 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


DEPARTMENT 

OF 

LOWELL EVENING TEXTILE SCHOOL 


Publication of this Document approved bt the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2M. 7-’34. Order 1903. 


TRUSTEES OF THE LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 
Officers. 

ROYAL P. WHITE, Chairman 

FREDERICK A. FLATHER, CHARLES H. EAMES, 

Vice-Chairman. Clerk . 

Trustees 

On the Part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Dr. Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education. 

On the Part of the City of Lowell. 

Hon. James J. Bruin, Mayor of Lowell. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1934. 

Thomas T. Clark, North Billerica, Treasurer, Talbot Mills, class of 1910. 

Joseph A. Gagnon, Lowell, President of The Gagnon Company. 

George M. Harrigan, Lowell, President, Lowell Trust Compan\ r . 

Stanley H. Wheelock, Uxbridge, President and Treasurer, Stanley Woolen 
Company, class of 1905. 

Vincent M. McCartin, Lowell, Superintendent of Public Schools. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1935. 

Frederick A. Flather, Lowell, Treasurer, Boott Mills, Boston corporation, mills 
at Lowell. 

Henry A. Bodwell, Andover, Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, Boston, class of 
1900. 

Edward M. Abbot, Westford, Manufacturer, Abbot Worsted Company, class 
of 1904. 

Mrs. H. L. Boutwell, 209 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Irving Southworth, Andover, Agent, Pacific Mills, Boston Corporation, mills at 
Lawrence. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1936. 

Royal P. White, Lowell, Agent, Stirling Mills, class of 1904. 

Edward B. Wentworth, 165 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Philip S. Marden, Lowell, Editor-in-chief, Courier-Citizen. 

Charles W. Churchill, Lowell, Manager, Churchill Manufacturing Company 
Inc., class of 1906. 

Tracy A. Adams, North Adams, Vice-President and General Manager, Arnold 
Print Works, class of 1911. 


LOWELL EVENING TEXTILE SCHOOL. 


By Act of the Legislature of 1928, the name of the Lowell Textile School was 
changed to Lowell Textile Institute, and the evening classes are organized and are 
to be hereafter operated as a department of the Institute to be known as the Lowell 
Evening Textile School. 


September 27, Thursday 
October 4, Thursday . 
October 8, Monday 
October 12, Friday 
November 12, Monda} r 

November 29, Thursday 
November 30, Friday . 
December 21, Frida} r . 


January 3, Thursday . 
February 22, Friday . 
March 8, Friday 
April 9, Tuesday 


CALENDAR. 

1934. 

. Registration. 

. Registration 
. Opening of evening school. 

. Columbus Day — Holiday. 

. Holiday — Observance of Armis- 
tice Day. 

. Thanksgiving recess. No classes. 
. End of first term. 

1935. 

. Opening of second term. 

. Washington's Birthday — Holiday. 

Closing of evening school 
. Graduation. 


3 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 




Billerica. 


Charles Holmes Eames, S.B 

President. 

Louis Atwell Olney, S.B., M.S., ScD. . . . 118 Riverside Street. 

Professor of Chemistry; in charge of Department of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
Edgar Harrison Barker . . . . . .9 Mount Hope Street. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Wool Yarns. 

Arthur Andrew Stewart . . . . . . 124 Luce Street. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Finishing. 

Hermann Henry Bachmann .... 146 Parkview Avenue. 

Professor of Textile Design; in charge of Department of Design and Weaving. 
Lester Howard Cushing, A.B., Ed.M. ... 10 Walden Street. 

Professor of History and Economics; in charge of Department of Languages, 
History and Economics; Secretary of the Faculty. 

Herbert James Ball, S.B., B.C.S. . . . 119 Wentworth Avenue. 

Professor of Textile Engineering; in charge of Department of Textile Engi- 
neering and Accountancy. 

Gilbert Roscoe Merrill, B.T.E. .... 364 Varnum Avenue. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Cotton Yarns and Knitting. 
Stewart Mackay ....... North Chelmsford. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Design. 

John Charles Lowe, B.T.E .161 Dracut Street. 

Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

Martin John Hoellrich .... 30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence. 

Assistant Professor of Weaving. 

Elmer Edward Fickett, B.S 

Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Frederick Steere Beattie, Ph.B 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

Harold Canning Chapin, Ph.D 

Assistant Professor of General Chemistry. 

Charles Lincoln Howarth, B.T.C. 

Assistant Professor of Dyeing. 

Percy Charles Judd, B.S 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Harry Chamberlain Brown, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

James Guthrie Dow, A.B 

Assistant Professor of English. 

Cornelius Leonard Glen 

Assistant Professor of Finishing. 

A. Edwin Wells, B.T.E. . . 204 Franklin Street, Melrose Highlands. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 


162 Hovey Street. 


285 Foster Street. 


290 Pine Street. 


North Billerica. 


156 Methuen Street. 


272 Merrimack Street. 


11 Robbins Street. 


R.F.D. No. 1, Lowell. 


Russell Lee Brown, B.T.E. 

Assistant Professor of Textiles. 
Charles Harrison Jack 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 
Ruth Foote, A.B., S.B. 

Instructor and Registrar. 

Albert Greaves Sugden 
Instructor in Weaving. 

Arthur Joseph Woodbury . 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

Russell Metcalf Fox 

Instructor in Textile Design. 

Charles Arthur Everett, B.T.C. 

Instructor in Dyeing. 

James Harrington Kennedy, Jr. 

Instructor in Wool Yarns and Sorting. 
William George Chace, Ph.B. . 
Instructor in Chemistry. 


59 Bradstreet Avenue. 


R.F.D. No. 1, Pelham, N. H. 


46 Victoria Street 


673 School Street. 


41 Morey Street. 


359 Beacon Street. 


Chelmsford. 


177 A Street. 


7 Sanborn Street. 


4 


John Leslie Merrill, B.T.E. 

Instructor in Weaving. 

John Henry Skinkle, 8.B . 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Franz Evron Baker, B.T.E. 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

Charles Frederick Edlund, B.S. 

Instructor in Sales Engineering. 

Milton Hindle, B.T.E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 

Horton Brown, B.S. . 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Elmer Percy Trevors 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Paul David Petterson 

Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 
Kenneth E. Leslie, .... 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry, 
de Gruchjr, James Campbell . 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Walter Ballard Holt 
Bursar. 

Florence Moore Lancey . 

Librarian. 

Helen Gray Flack, S.B. 

Secretary. 

Mona Blanche Palmer 
Clerk. 

Miriam Kaplan Hoffman, S.B. 

Clerk. 

Howard Dexter Smith, Ph.D. 

Evening Instructor in General Chemistry. 
Harold Arthur Giffin 

Evening Instructor in Design. 

Henry Earl McGowan, B.T.E. . 

Evening Instructor in Mathematics. 

Clyde F. Barlow, B.S. 

Evening Instructor in Electricity. 

Edward W. Dooley .... 

Evening Instructor in Advertising Design. 

V ITTORIA ROSATTO .... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 

J. Raymond Bradley .... 

Evening Instructor in Advertising Design. 
James C. Buzzell .... 

Evening Instructor in Electricity. 

Glen Bowden Caswell, 

Evening Instructor in Machine Shop. 

Bertha C. Hoellrich .... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 

Gatenby, Frederick William 

Evening Instructor in Worsted Yarns. 
Emmons, Arlene .... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 


2026 Middlesex Street. 
7 Sanborn Street. 
Dalton Road, Chelmsford. 
272 Merrimack Street. 
24 Highland Avenue, Melrose Highlands, 
178 Atlantic Avenue, Marblehead. 

18 Rhodora Street. 


East Chelmsford. 


9 Nineteenth Avenue, Haverhill. 
61 Pleasant Street, Stoneham 


37 Albert Street. 
46 Victoria Street. 
445 Stevens Street. 

. 685 Westford Street. 
43 Hawthorn Street 
Dalton Road, Chelmsford 
785 Stevens Street. 
36 Varney Street. 
165 Fort Hill Avenue. 
799 Chelmsford Street, 
63 Bradstreet Avenue. 
. 29 Paige Street. 
26 Princeton Boulevard. 
32 Hampshire Street. 


30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence. 

Forge Village 


7 55 Westford Street. 


EVENING CLASSES 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Entrance Requirements 

All applicants to the evening classes must understand the English language and 
simple arithmetic. Those who are graduates of a grammar or high school are 
admitted upon certificate. Those who cannot present such a certificate are required 
to take examination in the subjects of English and arithmetic. In the examination 
in English a short composition must be written on a given theme, and a certain 
amount must be written from dictation. In the examination in arithmetic the 
applicant must show suitable proficiency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
division, common and decimal fractions, percentage, ratio and proportion. Oppor- 
tunity to register or to take these examinations is offered each year, generally on 
the Thursday evenings of the two weeks previous to the opening of the evening 
school. 

Registration 

Before entering the class a student must fill out an attendance card, which can 
be obtained at the office or from the instructors in the various departments. 

Any student who has filed an attendance card and who wishes to change his 
course must notify the office before making the change. 

Sessions. 

The evening classes commence the second Monday of October and continue for 
twenty weeks. The school is open on four evenings each week during the period 
mentioned, except when the school is closed for holiday recesses. 

Supplies. 

Students must provide their own books, stationery, tools, etc., and pay for any 
breakage or damage that they cause. 

Students’ supplies will be sold from the co-operative store every evening school 
night from 6.45 to 8.15 p.m. 

Fees and Deposits. 

All evening courses are free to residents of Lowell. To those outside of Lowell 
the fee is $10 per year for each course of two nights per week. Students taking two 
courses or attending courses requiring more than two nights per week are required 
to pay $15 per year for three nights and $20 for four nights. 

All fees and deposits must he paid in advance. 

All students, whether from Lowell or not, taking Course 411, Chemistry and 
Dyeing Department, are required to make a deposit at the commencement of the 
course — $5 for first-year students, and $10 for second-year students. A deposit of 
$10 will be required of all students taking Course 412, 413 or 414. This is to cover 
the cost of laboratory breakages, chemicals, apparatus, etc., and at the end of the 
year any unexpended balance is returned, or an extra charge made for the excess 
breakage. 

All students taking Machine-Shop Practice will be required to make a deposit 
of $5. Any unexpended balance remaining at the end of the year will be returned 
to the student. 

Report of Standing. 

A report of standing covering the year’s work is sent to all students who attend 
the entire year and take the necessary examinations. 

Certificates. 

The courses of the evening school are varied and arranged to meet the special 
needs of those engaged in the industry. They vary in length from one to four 
years, and at the completion of each course the certificate of the school is awarded, 
provided, however, that the student has been in attendance in the course during 
the year for which the certificate is granted. 


6 

GENERAL EVENING COURSES 

The object of these courses is to give young men of ambition an opportunity 
to obtain instruction in all the branches of science that are allied with their daily 
work. For example, one who is employed as a weaver in a textile mill may obtain 
knowledge of the manufacture of yam, the production of a design, and the methods 
of finishing a fabric, as well as the manner of its weaving or knitting. In like 
manner the dyer may augment his knowledge of the chemicals and materials he 
is daily handling. The engineer and machinist may acquire a knowledge of the 
mathematics, science of mechanics, electricity and drawing that underlie all the 
work of an engineer. 

It is recognized that the interests of such students lie in a particular field of 
industry, and these courses are designed to bear directly upon the special line, 
and supplement, as far as possible, the practical work in which the student is en- 
gaged during the day. 

In a word, any man having a common school education and the ambition to ad- 
vance in his line may now secure a broad and comprehensive training in the sub- 
jects which will be of vital importance to him in obtaining the goal of his ideal. 

A description of all courses follows. 

COTTON DEPARTMENT. 

110. Cotton Yarns — 2 Years. 

Because of the desire of students to be able to complete the course in Cotton 
Yarns in less than three years, the schedule has been rearranged to complete the 
work in two years. If a sufficient demand develops for additional w r ork, it may be 
possible to add a course on Mill Organization which will follow the course in Cotton 
Yarns. 

The first year work in cotton yarn manufacture includes a study of cotton and 
its preparation for market, followed by a study of opening, picking, carding and 
combing. This work consists of lectures on these operations combined with prob- 
lems that are peculiar to each operation such as the drafts used and the production 
of each process as well as the amounts of w r aste made. Special consideration is 
given to the adjustment and care of these machines and some laboratory demon- 
stration is used to show the manner of adjusting machines for the purpose of con- 
trolling the weight of the product, the amount of work done in a day and the con- 
trol of w r aste. 

Two evenings each week. 

Cotton. — Before taking up the details of manufacturing cotton into yarn, a 
careful study of its physical characteristics is made. The geographical distribution 
of the areas producing commercial cottons is explained and the characteristics of 
the cottons produced in each are studied. A general explanation of the cultivation 
and harvesting of cotton is made, especially emphasizing the effect of agricultural 
factors on the cotton fiber and how these ma} r serve to complicate manufacturing 
problems. 

The ginning of cotton is considered, showing the yield of lint, the uses of cotton 
seed and the various types of gins and which cottons are commonly ginned on each. 

The intricate system of buying and selling cotton is studied to illustrate the 
problems a mill may meet in procuring cotton. In this connection, special em- 
phasis is placed on the classification of cottons by staple, grade and character. 

Opening and Picking. — Instruction in the preliminary operation of opening 
and picking covers the mechanical construction of the machines, their parts and 
adjustments, as fully as the manufacturing results accomplished by the machines. 
This includes such construction details as evener, lap measuring and safety stop 
motions, grids, cleaning trunks and beaters, also operation details which involve 
the adjustment for waste, drafts and character of laps. Some time is devoted to 
mixing in its various phases, showing in addition to improvement in uniformity of 
the product, how cottons are mixed to obtain definite average prices and how dif- 
ferent percentages of color may be obtained by mixing, expecially on the pickers. 


7 

Carding. — The process of carding is considered one of the most important, and 
proper time is devoted to the construction and operation of cards that the student 
may be familiar with the various parts of the card and the function and design of 
each. The construction and application of card clothing, as well as the methods 
of grinding, form a part of the work. Some time is given to a discussion of the 
waste made in carding, the regulation of the amounts of each made and the calcu- 
lation of the percentages. New and special attachments for various purposes are 
brought to the attention of the class, illustrating possible ways of improving carding 
conditions. 

Combing. — The preparation of card sliver for combing by means of the sliver 
lap per and ribbon lapper is thoroughly considered. The combing operation itself 
is studied in considerable detail, emphasizing the general object and operations in 
combing and the specific means employed by various types of combs in performing 
the operations. The calculations in this connection involve the drafts and doub- 
lings necessary to produce the proper lap for the comb, the proper comb drafts, and 
the determination of the per cent of noil produced. 

The second year work in cotton yarn manufacture includes a study of the oper- 
ations of drawing, roving, spinning, spooling, winding and twisting. The work 
consists largely of lectures and problems with some laboratory demonstrations to 
make the student familiar with the machines and the points of adjustment. 

Two evenings each week . 

Drawing. — Under this head is taken up the theory of doublings and their effect 
upon the quality of roving and yarn. • Like previous and subsequent processes the 
machine construction forms an important part of the work. Proper attention is 
paid to such subjects as stop motions, drawing rolls and their covering, clearers and 
evener motions. 

Roving Process. — Under this head are studied the various machines known as 
the slubber, intermediate, fine and jack fly frames. Each of the various motions 
of these complicated machines is treated separately and then the group is taken as 
a unit, tying each operation in with the others. Particular attention is paid to the 
subjects of lay and tension because of their importance in producing perfect roving. 
The calculations in this subject involve draft, twist, lay and tension with particular 
attention to the derivation of constants and their use. 

Ring Spinning. — The consideration of spinning yarn by the ring frame method 
involves a knowledge of the uses to which the yarn is to be put and subsequent 
methods of handling, that proper roving may be selected, suitable amounts of 
draft and twist provided, correct size of rings and travelers selected, and building 
motions suitably adjusted. Yarn defects are studied with reference to the cause 
and remedy, necessitating references to many of the earlier operations. 

Spooling and Winding. — The discussions under this head cover the treatment 
of single yarns, in preparation for twisting, comparing the relative merits of spooling 
with multiple winding on tubes, and beaming for special twisters. Winders are also 
considered as a means of preparing yarn packages for sale yarns. 

Twisting. — Because of the similarity to ring spinning, the emphasis is more on 
the manufacturing part of the work, although there are a few peculiar features of a 
mechanical nature. The twisting of various regular ply yams, the making of 
numerous fancy yarns and the principles underlying the production of various 
patterns is taken up here. The use of special twisters and other apparatus for 
cords and ropes is considered under this heading. 

WOOLEN AND WORSTED DEPARTMENT. 

210. Worsted Yarns — 2 Years. 

During the first year instruction consists of a lecture course on the various kinds 
of wool fibers, trade terms, sorting, scouring, carbonizing, etc., also a course in 
carding and the calculations involved in the mechanism of the machines, and a 
course covering gilling and combing and the processes of top making. 

Raw Materials. — A study of raw materials which enter into the manufacture 
of woolen or worsted yarns, or are made into yarns by processes similar to those 
employed in the manufacture of woolen and worsted yarns, would include silk , 


8 

mohair, alpaca, vicuna, cashmere, camel’s hair and cotton. In connection with 
these are considered shoddy, noils and extracts. 

Wool Sorting. — Familiarity with the various grades and kinds of wool is ob- 
tained by lecture. The various characteristics and properties are explained, as 
are also trade terms, such as picklock, XXX, XX, 3^-blood, M-blood, J^-blood, 
delaine, braid, etc. Some skill is acquired in the estimation of shrinkage and in 
judging the spinning qualities. 

Wool Scouring. — The object of scouring and the methods employed are ex- 
plained, and this involves the consideration of soaps and chemicals used in washing; 
also the waste products and their utilization. A demonstration of a commercial 
quantity of wool is scoured by machines that are made similar in operation to 
regular commercial machines. A study is made of the effect of the hardness of 
water upon soap. At the same time the use of driers, their operation and regulation, 
is taken up, and the methods of carbonizing wool, noils, burr waste, rags, etc., are 
studied and explained. 

Carding. — The different systems of carding wool, depending on whether it is 
to be made into woolen or worsted yarns, are fully explained, as well as the con- 
struction, setting and operation of cards. A part of this work consists of a study 
of card clothing, its construction, application and grinding. 

Top Making and Combing. — This branch takes up, besides the carding of the 
wool on a worsted card, the preparing processes, backwashing, also gilling of the 
stock before and after combing. The construction of the gill boxes and combs is 
studied by lectures. Later, quantities of stock are made into top and then into 
yarn. 

Three evenings each week. 

The second year is devoted to detail study of the English and French systems of 
worsted yarn manufacture. 

The Noble, Lister and French combs are studied, and the various calculations 
to determine draft, noiling, productions, etc., are made. 

Drawing and Spinning. — The equipment in the laboratory offers opportunity 
to make worsted yarn by either the Bradford or open drawing system or by the 
French system. The process includes the various machines in the successive steps 
of making Bradford spun yarn, and the functions of the different machines are 
studied. In the latter, or French system, the stock is run through the drawing 
machines, and the roving spun into yarn on the worsted mule. The same method 
of studying the mechanism and operations of these machines is followed as in the 
case of previous methods of instruction. The student by pursuing this course can 
compare the different methods of yarn manufacture and note the results of each. 

With the instruction in spinning by the Bradford system is given work on the 
twisters and the effects that may be produced. 

Three evenings each week. 

211. Woolen Yarns — 2 Years. 

During the first year instruction consists of a lecture course on the various kinds 
of wool fibers, trade terms, sorting, scouring, carbonizing, etc. 

One evening each week. 

The second year covers all the operations in detail necessary to manufacture 
yarns from raw stock on the woolen principle, and includes lectures and laboratory 
work on burr picking, wool blending, mixing, picking, wool oils and emulsions, 
carding, spinning on both mule and ring frame, and plain and novelty twisting. 

Two evenings each week. 

TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING DEPARTMENT. 

311. Cotton Design — 3 Years. 

During the first year instruction is given in elementary designing, starting with 
all the foundation weaves which may be used in fabrics such as the plain weave, 
rib weaves, basket weaves, twill weaves, satin weaves, granite weaves, etc. Com- 


9 

bination and derivative weaves are made up from the aforesaid weaves. Fancy 
and figured weaves, in most cases originated by the student, are produced. Color 
effects, which are so essential in fabrics, obtainable from the different weaves, as 
stated above, in which the color arrangement of warp and filling create the pattern , 
are thoroughly considered. Not only the designing, but also harness drafting 
and the making of dobby chains for all type of weave is taken up. 

Cloth analysis is considered in conjunction with designing, as a designer must 
know the kind of fabric he is designing, what material and wh^t size of yarns are 
to be used, and how heavy and costly the cloth is to be. The various topics dis- 
cussed are the sizes or counts of yarns made from all kinds of fibers, such as cotton, 
woolen, worsted, silk, rayon, jute and yarns of other vegetable fibers. Their 
relative length to the pound is determined in the single two or more ply, mixed 
yarns, novelty yarns and fancy yarns, in the American or English system. The 
same is given in the metric system. Problems involving the take-up of yarns in 
the weaving and finishing process are given. Samples of cloth are picked apart 
to determine their weaves and general construction. 

Two evenings each week. 

In the second year cloth analysis and design are combined in lecture and practice, 
starting with plain and leading into the more fancy cotton dobby fabrics. A great 
variety of samples of cloth are used in class work to determine ends and picks per 
inch, shrinkage in warp and filling, and the number of reed and reed widths necessary 
for eventual reconstruction. The yarn numbers of warp and filling are determined 
by aid of fine balances. The amount of warp and filling necessary for a piece of 
goods is calculated and the weight of a whole piece as well as the number of yards 
per pound are determined. 

Two evenings each week / 

In the third year more elaborate cloths are considered, both in designing and 
analysis, cloths in which extra warp or extra filling, or both, are used. Warp 
backed, filling backed, double, triple or more plied fabrics are taken up, such as 
marseilles, quiltings, pique, suspenders, narrow webbings, velveteens, fancy vel- 
veteens, velvets, corduroys, Bedford cords, plushes, leno, in fact, anything a student 
may suggest which might help him in his work. 

Two evenings each week . 

312. Woolen and Worsted Design — 3 Years. 

This course covers the design and analysis of standard woolen and worsted fabrics 
and is intended for those who wish to specialize in this branch of textile fabric 
manufacture. Special and fancy fabrics are studied to the extent that time will 
permit. 

During the first year instruction is given in the subject of classification of fabrics, 
use of points or design paper, plain fabrics, intersection, twills and their derivation, 
sateen, basket and rib weaves, checks and stripes, fancy weaves, including figured 
and colored effects; producing chain and draw from design, and vice versa ; extending 
and extracting weaves. 

The analysis of samples is taken up in a systematic manner, illustrating the 
various cloth constructions for the purpose of determining the design of the weaves 
and the amount and kind of yarns used, and forms the basis of calculation in the 
cost of reproducing any style of goods. The various topics discussed are reeds and 
setts; relation and determination of counts of cotton, woolen, worsted, silk and 
yarns made from the great variety of vegetable fibers; grading of yarns, folded, ply, 
novelty and fancy yarns; application of the metric system to yarn calculation; 
problems involving take-up, average counts, determination of counts of yarn, and 
weight of yarn required to produce a given fabric. 

Two evenings each week . 

During the second year instruction is given in cotton warp goods, blankets, bath 
robes, filling reversible, extra warp and filling backs, figured effects produced by 
extra warp and filling, double cloths and plaid backs. 

The analysis work follows as closely as possible the type of fabrics taken up in 


10 

the designing and the reconstruction of these fabrics with the consideration of 
their shrinkage and composition. 

Two evenings each week. 

In the third year instruction is given in multiple fabrics, chinchilla, Bedford cords, 
crepon, matelasse and imitations, double plains, meltons, kersey, plush and suitings. 
At this time also is taken up the construction of designers’ blankets, suggestion 
cards, and the construction of samples. 

The construction of new fabrics from theoretical viewpoint together with the 
construction from suggestion cards is taken up. In connection with this work in- 
struction is given in making cost estimates for both woolen and worsted fabrics. 

Two evenings each week . 

314. Cotton Weaving — 1 Year. 

The Course in Cotton Weaving covers instruction on plain looms, Draper Auto- 
matic and Stafford Automatic looms. It includes instruction on the construction 
of shedding and picking motions, take-up and let-off motions together with the 
operation of the magazines and hoppers and methods of changing shuttle and 
bobbin. A study is also made of the preparation of warps, beaming, sizing and 
drawing-in. The Crompton and Knowles Automatic Towel Looms, and the 
various types of box looms, including chain building and work on multipliers, are 
also considered in this course. 

One evening each week. 

315. Woolen and Worsted Weaving — 2 Years. 

This course includes instruction on the Crompton and Knowles loom and takes 
up general construction, head motions, take-up, let-off, filling stop motion, etc. 
The preparation of warps, wet and dry dressing, is given in connection with this 
course. 

One evening each week. 

316. Dobby and Jacquard Weaving — 1 Year. 

This course considers the various types of Jacquard heads and dobbies, which 
includes single cross border dobbies and leno attachments on double lift dobbies, 
handkerchief motions, leno weaving, center selvedge motions, filling changing 
looms, oscillating reeds, lappet motions, various shaker motions, towel and other 
pile cloth weaving. The course on Jacquard looms includes general construction, 
card cutting, lacing, repeating and fixing. 

One evening each week. 

317. Art Course — 3 Years. 

The first year work consists of charcoal drawing from casts, models, and group 
arrangements of still life. 

Two evenings each week . 

During the second year instruction is given in color harmony — a study of true 
color and the variety of effects obtainable. 

Two evenings each week. 

In the third year the student chooses one of the following options: 

1. Design — Motifs suitable for fabric, wall paper, linoleum, etc. 

2. Costume Illustration — Drawing from the clothed figure. 

3. Oil Painting — A study of values and color using oil as a medium. 

Two evenings each week. 

318. Advertising Design — 2 Years. 

Lettering. — During the first year the student is taught to master the drawing, 
with pencil, of a few very plain alphabets, both upper and lower case letters, also 
plain figures. With the characteristics of plain letter alphabets well in mind, it is 
but a few steps to make any of the more intricate ones. Following this he will make 
simple “lay-outs” of plain card signs, and then take up the lettering, with brush 
and paint, of some of his simple card designs. 

Two evenings each week. 


11 

Show Card Design — The second year is simply a continuation of the latter part 
of the first year work, with the addition of advanced design in the “lay-out” and 
color-scheme of practical show cards and posters, such as are designed and lettered 
in the up-to-date Show Card Shop of to-day. 

Two evenings each week. 

CHEMISTRY AND DYEING DEPARTMENT. 

Hardly any branch of applied science plays so important a part in our industrial 
world as chemistry. Many large mills employ chemists as well as dyers, and with 
the great progress which is being made in the manufacture and application of dye- 
stuffs, a basic knowledge of chemistry becomes an absolute necessity to the dyer. 
Within a comparatively short distance from Lowell are establishments employing 
men who require some knowledge of chemistry but who may not necessarily use 
dyes. Some find a knowledge of analytical chemistry helpful in their everyday 
work. 

To meet these varying needs of our industrial community, the school offers a 
two-year course in general chemistry, organic and inorganic, which may be followed 
by any one of three courses, viz., textile chemistry and dyeing, analytical chemistry, 
and textile and analytical chemistry. In order to take Course 412, 413 or 414, 
candidates must have a certificate from Course 411, or show by examination or 
approved credentials that they have taken the equivalent of the work covered by 
this course. 

411. Elementary Chemistry — 2 Years. 

General Chemistry, including Inorganic and Organic. 

Qualitative Analysis. 

One lecture and one Laboratory Period per week in General Chemistry the first 
year, continued three nights a week during the second year, when the Elementary 
Organic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis is completed. 

Instruction in Elementary Chemistry extends through two years, and includes 
lectures, recitations and a large amount of individual laboratory work upon the 
following subjects: — 

Theoretical Chemistry. — Chemical action, chemical combination, combining 
weights, atomic weights, chemical equations, acids, bases, salts, Avogadro’s law 
molecular weights, formulae valence, periodic law, etc. 

Non-Metallic Elements. — Study of their occurrence, properties, preparation, 
chemical compounds, etc. 

Metallic Elements. — Study of their occurrence, properties, metallurgy, chem- 
ical compounds, etc. 

The students take up, as thoroughly as time will permit, the qualitative detection 
of the more common metals and non-metals, with practical work. 

This work, although necessarily elementary, is intended to prepare the student 
to study more understandingly the manufacture of dyestuffs and coal tar colors in 
the more advanced courses which follow. 

During the first year of the Elementary Chemistry course most of the time is 
devoted to the non-metals and theoretical chemistry, and the laboratory work 
covers briefly the non-metals. 

Two evenings each week . 

During the second year the classroom work is upon metals and the hydrocarbons 
and their derivatives, and the laboratory work consists entirely of Qualitative 
Analysis. While this course is necessarily taken up in an abbreviated and ele- 
mentary manner, it is so arranged that the students may become familiar with the 
separations and the detections of the common metals and acids. This course is 
also preliminary to the work given in Analytical Chemistry. 

Three evenings each week. 

412. Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — 3 Years. 

Lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Laboratory Work in Dyeing. 


12 

Covered by 60 lectures and two nights of laboratory work per week. 

The outline of the lecture course given in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing is as 
follows : — 

Technology of Vegetable Fibers. — Cotton, linen, jute, hemp, china grass. 
Chemical and physical properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, 
and their action with chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Animal Fibers. — Wool, mohair, silk. Chemical and physical 
properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, and their action with 
chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Artificial Fibers. — Study of the various forms of artificial 
silk, the process of manufacture, their properties and action with chemicals, acids 
and heat. 

Operations Preliminary to Dyeing. — Bleaching of cotton and linen; wool- 
scouring; bleaching, fulling and felting of wool; carbonizing; silk-scouring and 
bleaching, action of soap. 

The bleaching of cotton is studied with description of the various forms of kiers 
and machinery used; also the action of the chemicals used upon the material, 
and the various precautions that must be taken in order to insure successful work. 

Under this heading is included a study of the reagents used in the emulsive wool- 
scouring process, and their action upon the fiber under various conditions ; also the 
most successful of the solvent methods of degreasing wool. 

Water and its Application in the Textile Industry. — Impurities present, 
methods for detection, their effect during the different operations of bleaching, 
scouring, dyeing and printing, and the methods used for their removal or correction. 

The important subject of boiler waters is also studied under this heading, with a 
full discussion of the formation of boiler scale, its disastrous results, and the methods 
by which it may be prevented. 

Mordants and Other Chemical Compounds used in Textile Coloring, 
and Classified as Dyestuffs. — Theory of mordants, their chemical properties 
and application, aluminum mordants, iron mordants, tin mordants, chromium 
mordants, organic mordants, tannin materials, soluble oil, fixing agents, leveling 
agents, assistants, and numerous other compounds not dyestuffs that are exten- 
sively used in the textile industry. 

Under this heading are included the definitions of various terms and classes of 
compounds used by textile colorists, such as color lakes, pigments, fixing agents, 
developing agents, mordanting principles and leveling agents. 

Natural Organic Coloring Matters. — Properties and application of indigo, 
logwood, catechu or cutch, Brazil wood, cochineal, fustic, tumeric, madder, quer- 
citron bark, Persian berries, and other natural dyestuffs that have been used in 
recent years by textile colorists. 

Mineral Coloring Matters. — Under this heading are discussed the proper- 
ties of such inorganic coloring matters and pigments as chrome yellow, orange and 
green, Prussian blue, manganese brown, iron buff. 

Artificial Coloring Matters. — General discussion of their history, nature, 
source, methods of manufacture, methods of classification and their application 
to all fibers. 

Besides lectures and recitations upon the subject of Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing, practical laboratory work is required. By the performance of careful and 
systematic experiments the student learns the nature of the various dyestuffs and 
mordants, their coloring properties, their action under various circumstances, and 
the conditions under which they give the best results. The more representative 
dyestuffs of each class are applied to cotton, wool and silk, and each student is 
obliged to enter, in an especially arranged sample book, a specimen of each of his 
dye trials with full particulars as to the conditions of experiment, percentage of 
compounds used, time, temperature of dye baths, etc. 

For convenience and economy most of the dye trials are made upon small skeins 
or swatches of the required materials, but from time to time students are required 
to dye larger quantities in the full-sized dyeing machines. 


13 


413. Analytical Chemistry — 3 Years. 

Laboratory Work and Lectures in Quantitative Analysis. 

Three nights each week of class-room and laboratory work. 

The object of this course is to give the student a general idea of the underlying 
principles of Analytical Chemistry, with a sufficient amount of laboratory work to 
enable him to become proficient in performing the ordinary routine analysis of the 
textile plant. Frequent recitations are held for the discussion of methods and the 
solution of stoichiometrical problems. 

The work covered the first two years is based on Talbot’s “Quantitative Analy- 
sis,” and for the advanced work, consists of the analysis of soap, water, oils, cloth 
and other materials of particular interest to the textile chemist, special lecture notes 
and Griffin’s “Technical Methods of Analysis” is used as a text. 

414. Textile and Analytical Chemistry — 4 Years. 

Lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Laboratory Work in Analytical Chemistry. 

Combines all lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing with work of Course 413, 
but does not include any Dyeing Laboratory. 

Three evenings each week . 

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 
510. English Composition — 2 Years. 

Remedial English and Rhetoric— First year. Parts I and II. In order 
to write well it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of grammar. More- 
over, it is a great satisfaction to know why you are correct in speaking and writing 
a certain way. This course is designed to give a comprehensive survey of necessary 
grammatical and rhetorical principles. 

The following subjects are studied: The eight parts of speech — characteristics 
and use of each; the kinds and the structure of sentences; punctuation; the building 
up of the paragraph; the principles of composition; description, exposition, narra- 
tion, argumentation, and letter writing; study of difficult words; and selections 
from various authors to be read for general interest and for the purposes of illus- 
tration. 

10 assignments in each part with an examination at the end of each part. 

One evening each week . 

Problems in the Interpretation and the Appreciation of Literature — 
Second year. — This subject is offered for those who wish to enlarge their cultural 
background and to study the principles of literary appreciation and criticism. 
Altho there will be emphasis upon literary technique, the constant aim will be to 
keep this subordinate to the spirit and the message of the selection. 

The prose and the poetry studied will be treated analytically, with directed 
investigation of the various literary appeals — the intellectual, the sensory, the 
emotional, the aesthetic, the imaginative, and the philosophical. Emphasis will 
also be placed upon the value of an extensive reading program. (This course will 
not be given if the registration is less than twenty-five.) 

One evening each week. 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

This department has arranged to offer those courses of study which lie at the 
foundation of all engineering. These are designed to give to those engaged in the 
mechanical, electrical, and manufacturing departments of mills, factories and other 
industrial establishments an opportunity to learn something concerning the theory 
underlying the many practical methods which they use in their daily work. Those 
subjects for which there is usually a regular demand are listed and described below, 
but. similar and allied courses will also be arranged for provided there is a sufficient 
demand. In the case of all courses there must be an enrollment of at least ten 
properly qualified students to warrant giving the subject. 


14 


613. Mechanical Drawing — 3 Years. 

For one having occasion to make a sketch or detail drawing for the purposes of 
illustration or instruction, or for one who is daily required to work from a drawing 
or blueprint, the course in Mechanical Drawing is offered. It first lays a founda- 
tion of the principles of mechanical drawing, and follows this with two years’ work 
in drawing directly from parts of machines, preparing both the detail and the 
assembly drawing. 

This course is a complete course in drawing and requires two evenings per week 
for three years for its completion. The work is so planned that at its completion 
a man shall be thoroughly familiar with the making of a working or shop drawing. 
After a study of the underlying principles of projections and instruction in penciling, 
inking, lettering and tracing, the subject of sketching and the making of detail 
drawings therefrom is especially stressed. The preparation of assembly drawings 
is finally considered. 

614. Machine Shop Practice — 2 Years. 

This course offers an opportunity to learn the art of metal working and is equally 
valuable to the man who already has some knowledge of the methods employed as 
to one who has no knowledge of the same. Thus it becomes possible for one who 
may be working at the bench during the day to learn how to operate a lathe or other 
machine tool, or for a lathe hand to acquire a knowledge of a planer, shaper, milling 
machine, or grinder. A series of lectures is given on the care and management of 
tools, tool grinding, and the mechanism of the machines. A man who only has a 
knowledge of the special machine he operates may by means of this course become 
a more intelligent machinist. He should supplement this study with the courses 
in Mechanical Drawing, and in Mechanics and Mechanism, in order that his train- 
ing for an all-round machinist or mechanic may be more complete. The time 
required is two evenings each week. 

619. Mechanics and Mechanism — 2 Years. 

This is one of the most important of engineering subjects dealing as it does with 
the principles which underlie the transmission of force and motion through ma- 
chines and mechanical devices. Its principles are so fundamental and so widely 
used in more advanced subjects that the student should not consider himself qualified 
for further work until he has mastered the principles of this subject. 

Beginning with a discussion of such important topics as work, power, horse- 
power, energy and the like, the student then studies the fundamental mechanical 
principles which are exemplified by the lever, jackscrew, pulley block, inclined 
plane, wedge, differential pulley and other similar devices. This is followed by 
consideration of the simpler relations pertaining to uniform and accelerated motion 
and the course concludes with a study of pulleys, belting, gears and gearing, as far as 
time permits. No student should undertake this course who is not thoroughly 
familiar with elementary mathematics. This subject requires attendance two 
evenings each week with home problem work and the study of a text book. 

620. Mathematics — 2 Years. 

This course is designed to permit the student to pursue further by evening study 
the mathematics of his grammar or junior high school course. It includes algebra, 
elementary trigonometry, logarithms and slide rule, and requires attendance for 
two evenings each week. It should be taken by all who intend to study further into 
engineering subjects. Instruction is largely through problem work in class and 
at home, and the use of a text book. 

Some of the topics treated are — 

Elementary algebraic operations of — 

Addition. Linear equations. 

Subtraction. Radicals. 

Multiplication. Quadratic equations. 

Division. Logarithms. 

Factoring. Slide rule. 

Fractions . Trigo nometry . 

Graphical representation. 


15 


621. Strength of Materials — 1 Year. 

This interesting subject deals with those important principles whereby the person 
engaged in machine, engine, mill or building design may ascertain whether the parts 
are strong enough to carry the forces and loads which the nature of the construction 
imposes upon them. 

The fundamental stresses of tension, compression and shear are first considered, 
together with the ultimate strength of cast iron, wrought iron, steel, and timber. 
The practical use of this information is illustrated in the design 6f bolts, tie rods, 
columns, wall piers, boiler shells, riveted joints, etc. This is followed by a study 
of the stresses in and design of beams under various conditions of loading, and the 
course concludes with a discussion of the torsional stresses and twist in shafts. A 
knowledge of the principles of Mechanics and Mechanism is highly desirable to a 
satisfactory understanding of this subject. The time required is two evenings each 
week and the method of instruction is through lectures, recitations, problems, and 
the use of a text book. 

622. Steam — 1 Year. 

It is the purpose of this course to study the various methods of heat generation, 
transmission, and utilization in use at the present day and to learn the theoretical 
relationship which underlie these processes and transformations. 

The instruction covers, so far as time permits, the elements of steam engineering. 
The topics covered are heat and its measurement, use of steam tables, types of 
boilers, engines and turbines, boiler and engine room accessories, together with a 
study of the methods of testing the various types of apparatus. Actual tests on 
such equipment are made as the size of the class permits. Text books, laboratory 
and class work, and home problems are the methods of instruction used, requiring 
an attendance of two evenings each week. 

623. Direct Current Electricity — 2 Years. 

This popular course is planned to cover the fundamentals of direct current 
circuits and machinery. The lectures on electrical theory are supplemented by 
laboratory work and the use of a text book and problems. It requires for its com- 
pletion attendance for two evenings each week and a considerable amount of home 
study and preparation. Students who wish to take this subject must have studied 
one year of algebra. 

The fundamental properties of electrical and magnetic circuits are studied both 
in the classroom and laboratory. Other topics include the measurement of resis- 
tance, the calculation and measurement of power in direct-current circuits, and the 
relation between the electrical, heat and mechanical units of energy. A large 
amount of laboratory and class work is given to make the student familiar with 
methods of operation, testing and control of direct current machinery. 

624. Alternating Current Electricity. — 2 Years. 

This course is similar to Course 623 except that it deals with alternating current 
circuits and machinery. No student should plan to take this course unless he has 
previously taken at least one year of Course 623 or can show that he has had the 
equivalent. 

The fundamental properties of alternating current circuits are first considered, 
and are followed by a study of the operation of alternating current machinery. 
The study of electrical measuring instruments is also included in this course. The 
instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, and a large amount of labora- 
tory work. An attendance of two evenings each week is required. 

625. Power Plant Machinery — 1 Year. 

The purpose of this course is to teach the operating engineer how to test the va- 
rious units usually found in a power plant. Numerical calculations are introduced 
and the interpretation of the results is of primary importance. 

The following are some of the machines tested: engine, turbine, triplex pump, 
centrifugal pump, injector, etc. Various gages are also calibrated. 

A test book is required and the class is held two evenings each week. 


16 


626. Mill Illumination — 1 Year. 

Because of the demand by mill men, this course is now offered to evening 
students and requires an attendance of two evenings each week . 

Safety and production, factors entering into the design of lighting installations, 
industrial codes, costs and estimates are carefully considered. The laboratory 
exercises include the study of photometric curves of industrial units, study and use 
of the photometer, study of illumination by means of the Macbeth Illuminometer, 
and foot-candle meter. 

The concluding work will be the complete design of a lighting installation, using 
the Institute laboratories or a local mill room. 

Owing to limitations in apparatus, this course is open to a limited number of 
qualified men. 

627. Textile Marketing — 1 Year. 

An elementary course designed to acquaint the student with the principles of 
selling and merchandising of textiles. 

The selling agent, broker, converter, wholesaler, merchant, factor, and other 
intermediaries in the channels of distribution are studied as well as the fundamentals 
of salesmanship, advertising, styling, market research, pricing, retailing, whole- 
saling, and forecasting. 

The material is presented by means of lectures and class discussions on assigned 
problems. An attendance of two evenings each week is required. 

Accounting Classes (Division of University Extension") 

Classes in Elementary, Advanced and Cost Accounting have been offered in 
past years at the Lowell Evening Textile School under the auspices of the Division 
of University Extension, State House, Boston, Mass. Their continuance is de- 
pendent upon a sufficient expression of interest in them. Outlines of the courses, 
fees, etc., may be obtained by inquiry at the above address or by addressing the 
school. 

FINISHING DEPARTMENT. 

In these courses machine work is supplemented by lectures and discussions per- 
taining to the many finishes given to fabrics. The action of soaps, water, steam, 
heat and cold upon cloth containing one fiber or combination of fibers as used in 
commercial fabrics is carefully studied. These courses also help the finisher to 
broaden his knowledge of textile fabrics. Attendance is required for two evenings 
each week. 

710. Woolen and Worsted Finishing — 1 Year. 

The outline of this course, which is given chiefly by means of lecture work, is as 
follows : 

Burling and Mending. — Under this head are taken up for consideration the 
examination of flannel as it comes from the loom; the construction, use and location 
of the perch; the methods used in marking defects, measuring, weighing and num- 
bering of cloths; also the methods of inspection for fancies, single cloths and double 
cloths. The object of burling, mending and the types of tables employed, the 
method of removing knots, runners, etc., the object of back shearing and the use 
of burling irons, the replacing of missing threads and the importance of sewing as 
a part of the finishing process, are also considered in detail. The removal of oil 
and tar spots as well as stains of various kinds is studied. 

Fulling. — This branch covers a study of the conditions of the flannel as it 
comes from the loom, and the influence of oil, etc., upon the procedure. Consider- 
able time is devoted to the various methods of producing a felt, the various types 
of stocks and their modifications and development into the present type of rotary 
fulling mills of both single and double variety. The details of construction in all 
machines are carefully taken up and include the design and composition of the 
main rolls, method of covering, regulation and means of adjusting the pressure of 
traps and rolls, and the use and regulation of the various types of stopmotion, the 
different types of stretchers, guide rolls and throat plates. 

The theory of felt is taken up and the influence of pressure, moisture, heat, alkali 


17 

and acid is considered, as well as the hydroscopic and felting properties of different 
wool fibers. The preparation of the flannel for the mill and the usual methods of 
determining shrinkages, as well as the various methods of soaping, are given careful 
attention. The preparation of various fulling soaps and the value of each for the 
production of various degrees of felt, as well as the determination of the proper 
amount of alkali for various goods, are carefully studied and demonstrated. The 
manipulation of the various kinds of goods in the mill, viz., all wool, reworked 
wools and mixed goods, is studied in classroom and by operation in the laboratory. 

The change in weight and strength for each operation is carefully considered, as 
is also the value of the flocks made in each. A study of the various methods of 
flocking, such as dry and wet, is considered in both class and machine rooms. In 
each operation the defects likely to materialize are studied, as well as the cause 
thereof, and various methods of modifying or lessening them. 

Washing and Speck Dyeing. — This branch considers the scouring, rinsing and 
washing of goods both before and after the fulling process; the various types of 
washers; and the details of construction, such as suds box, rolls, etc. The theory 
of scouring, uses of Fuller’s earth, salt solutions and sours on the different kinds of 
goods are made clear by practical work in the machine room, where the effects due 
to improper scouring, such as stains, cloudy effects, wrinkles and unclean goods, 
are demonstrated. The discussion of the necessity of speck dyeing follows natur- 
ally from the study of these matters, and includes methods of preparation, ma- 
terials used, application and tests required. 

Carbonizing. — This is an important branch of finishing, and includes a study 
of the various carbonizing agents, methods of application, strength of solutions and 
neutralizing, as well as the machines used. Stains and imperfections resulting 
from carbonizing are also considered. The drying and tentering machines and 
extractors employed are taken up at this point. 

Gigging, Napping and Steaming. — The construction in detail of the various 
types of gigs, nappers, steamers, wet gigs, rolling, stretching, crabbing and singeing 
machines is discussed, and their actions upon the cloth and the results obtained 
are explained. 

Various methods of obtaining luster and the production of permanent finish are 
considered in connection with steaming and sponging. 

Brushing, Shearing and Pressing. — This includes, as do the other branches, 
a careful treatment of the machine employed, the preparation of the cloth for each 
process, the action of each machine in producing its part of the resultant effect. 
In the manipulation of the shear consideration is given to its setting, grinding and 
adjustment. With the brushing machine the effect of steaming and moisture upon 
the luster and feel of the goods is shown. A study of the action of the presses, both 
plate and rotary, involves consideration of pressure, steaming, etc. Special pro- 
cesses to obtain particular effects are taken up, and the part played by each machine 
is explained. The details involved in handling cloth on a commercial scale, as, for 
example, measuring, weighing, ticketing, numbering and rolling, are also explained. 
The necessary calculation and the methods of finishing all grades of goods are con- 
sidered from time to time during the year. 

Two evenings each week. 

711. Cotton Finishing — 1 Year. 

The outline of the course in the finishing of cotton fabrics is as follows: — 

Cloth Room. — Instruction of the various goods and the objects thereof; con- 
struction of the various types of inspecting and trimming machines. 

Shearing. — The object. A consideration of the various types of shears for 
treating one or both sides at the same time; also the use of the usual cleaning de- 
vices, such as emery, sand and card rolls, beaters and brushes; grinding and the 
adjustment of the various parts. 

The use of brushing and cleaning machines, rolling devices and calender attach- 
ments for gray goods. 

Singeing. — Developing and object of singeing; the construction of singers of all 


18 

types, and for various purposes; the use of cooling tanks, steaming devices, rolling 
and brushing attachments. 

Regulation of the flame for various goods, and adjustment of the parts; gas and 
air pressure, water-cooled rolls; the effect of moisture on the cost of singeing; the 
use of dry cans in connection with singeing; electric singeing. 

Washing. — Open width and string washers, their construction and operation; 
soaps, temperature, squeeze rolls; washing of various goods and the object thereof; 
stains. 

Napping. — The object of napping and the usual method of treating goods; 
various types of nappers, single and double acting; felting nappers; construction, 
grinding and adjustment of various types. 

Water Mangles. — Their object and construction of various types; various 
rolls, — iron, husk, etc., scutchers, their object and construction. 

Starch Mangles. — The object and construction of all types of starch mangles 
for pure starch and filled goods; various types of rolls, — brass, rubber, wood; action 
of doctor blades, etc.; regulation and object of pressure. 

Methods of starching and finishing all standard goods, also a consideration 
of the various substances used, such as starch, softener and fillers; the preparation 
of starch and various methods of application. 

Dryers and Stretchers. — Both horizontal and vertical, tenter frames, clips; 
the swing motion and the finishes thus produced; construction; spraying machines, 
belt stretchers, button breakers; their object and construction. 

Calenders. — The object and construction of all types, including the regulation 
of pressure and nips for the production of various finishes; various types of rolls 
and their uses, — steel, husk and paper; the use of hot and cold rolls; chasing, fric- 
tion, embossing and Shriner calenders and the various finishes produced by each; 
production of watered effects; beetling machines. 

Making up room, — yarding, inspecting; different types of folds; pressing, paper- 
ing, marking. 

Two evenings each week. 


EVENING GRADUATES OF 1934. 


Certificates awarded as follows, April 10, 1934: 

Cotton Yarns — 3 Years. 
Harold Anderson ...... 

Harry Gustaf Hjerpe ...... 

Worsted Yarns — 2 Years. 
Joseph Linwood Allen, Jr. . 

Leslie Newell Center ...... 

John Christison ...... 

Joseph Leo FitzGerald ..... 

Woolen Yarns — 2 Years. 

Harry Lawrence Edwards ..... 
William Edward Laskey ..... 
Herbert Hodgson Robinson .... 

Cotton Design — 3 Years. 

Leo Napoleon Cyr 

Lucien R. Dupuis ...... 

John Janas ....... 


Arlington 

Quincy 


Lawrence 
Wilton, N. H. 
Methuen 
Milford, N. H. 


Lowell 

Dracut 

Methuen 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Woolen and Worsted Design — 3 Years. 

David Alexander Stirling Doig ..... Andover 

Benjamin Kalinowski ...... North Andover 

James Venn ........ Forge Village 


19 

Freehand Drawing — 3 Years. 


Albert Milton Anderson 
Mary Blanche Bouffard 
Gabrielle Alice Clermont 
Albert Charles Cormier 
William Edward Hurrell 
Loyola Rita Kiernan . 
Delia Moses 

Katherine Arlene Redmond 
Rita Theresa Sullivan 


Show Card Design — 2 Years. 
George John Chrisostomedes .... 
Irene Elizabeth DeLorme ..... 
George Stuart Dickison ..... 

I var Eric Gustafson . . . 

Maurice Joseph Inamorati 

Dora May Laflamme ..... 

Omer Lafontaine ...... 

Anna Esther McErlane ..... 

Clifford Garner Marsden ..... 

Simon Harry Moreau, Jr. . 

Cotton Weaving — 1 Year. 
Harold Anderson ...... 

Chester Arthur Brown ..... 

David Mungall Brown ..... 

Harry Robert Buckley ..... 

Robert Theodore Charlton, Jr. 

Leander Forest Conley ..... 

Frank Cunha ....... 

Leo Walter Fitzgerald ..... 

Norman Garlington ...... 

Melvin Reade Hall ...... 

Harry Gustaf Hjerpe ..... 

Patrick Joseph Keegan ..... 

Harold Norman Logan .....' 

Fred Dean Manchester ..... 

Lionel Thiophile Pelletier ..... 

Kenneth Lawrence Stearns ..... 

Thomas Fletcher Thomson ..... 

Lionel Donat Turcotte ..... 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Dracut 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Dracut 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Dracut 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Arlington 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Dracut 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Quincy 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Woolen and Worsted Weaving — 2 Years. 


Philip Schubert Benoit ...... Methuen 

James Bernard Cousen ...... Lawrence 

Clement Freyre ........ Lawrence 

Harry Augustine Matthes, Jr. .... Lawrence 

Walter Edward Witalis ...... Lowell 


Dobby and Jacquard Weaving — 1 Year. 

Lionel Thiophile Pelletier ...... Lowell 


Chester Arthur Brown 
Charles Eugene Dube 
Graham Allard Giffin 
Ralph William Giffin . 
Fred Dean Manchester 
Fred Joseph Starke 


Loom Fixing — 1 Year. 


Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 




Woolen and Worsted Finishing — 1 Year. 


George Whitehouse Arthur . 


Methuen 

Walter Samuel Bean, Jr. 


Lowell 

Peter Borrows, Jr. 


Chelmsford 

Thomas Bruce .... 


Methuen 

Russell Wade Clarke . 


Lowell 

Stanley Joseph Dziadosz 


Lawrence 

Luis Echavarria 


Lowell 

Robert Augustine Girard 


Lawrence 

William Samuel Heffernan . 


Methuen 

Thomas Francis Killilea 


Lawrence 

Arthur Francis Kittredge, Jr. 


Melrose 

John Henry Lorigan . 


Lowell 

Joseph Miller, Jr. 


Lowell 

John Bernard Murphy 


Lowell 

Ernest Dobson Robinson ...... 

Elementary Chemistry — 2 Years. 

Methuen 

Norman Ashton 


Methuen 

Peter John Bandis 


Lowell 

Harold Francis Bradley 


Lawrence 

Alfred Calabrese 


East Boston 

Robert Martin Chenevert . 


Lowell 

Aristophanes Demetrius Gatzimos 


Lowell 

Nelson Fletcher Getehell 


Lowell 

Paul Roland Giroux . 


Lowell 

Otis Caton Gorman . 


Nashua, N. H. 

Lawrence Paul Hartigan 


Lowell 

Raymond Lucien Hebert 


Lawrence 

Raymond Louis Huard 


Haverhill 

Ralph Irving Kenyon 

. . 

Methuen 

Douglas Ormiston Lees 


West Medford 

George Augustine Molloy . 


Lawrence 

Frank Lewis Orrell, Jr. 


Lowell 

William Alexander Page 


Andover 

Carleton Prescott 


Lawrence 

Joseph Edward Reidy. 


Lowell 

Harry Richardson 


Lawrence 

Edward Wallace Rutyna 


Lowell 

Clifton Charles Timms 


Methuen 

William Murray Urquhart . 


Andover 

Raymond Widdop Wood 


Lawrence 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — 3 Years. 

John Bernard Moran . 


Methuen 

Earl Whitney Pulsifer ...... 

Analytical Chemistry — 3 Years. 

Nashua, N. H. 

Dumont Rudolph Vigneault 


Lowell 

Wilbur Lane Williams 


Lowell 


Textile and Analytical Chemistry — 4 Years. 

William Aloysius Kulpinski ..... Lawrence 

Raymond William Schernig ..... Lawrence 


James Badger . 
John Corriera, Jr. 
Leo Jerome Perry 
Dore Earle Tyler 


Mechanical Drawing — 3 Years. 

Nashua, N. H. 
Lowell 
Lawrence 
Lowell 


21 

Machine Shop Practice — 2 Years. 


Wilfred Bottomley 
James John Manikas . 
Michael William Schofield 


North Andover 

Lowell 

Lawrence 


Mathematics — 2 Years. 


Margaret Kennedy Burns . 
Thomas Francis Carden 
Caroline Mary DeNicola 
Mary Louise Donohoe 
James Edward Driscoll 
Lionel Ducharme 
Theodore Kapala 
Bernard Frank Lawson 
Donald McKeown 
Claire Anna Quigley . . . 

Stanley Waclaw Rasimowicz 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

North Billerica 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Steam — 1 Year. 


Frank Milton Campbell ...... Clinton 

Frank Matheson Stebbings ...... Lawrence 

Stephen Patrick Tobin, Jr. . . . . . . Lowell 

Randolph Carter Wills . . . . . Lowell 


Textile Marked 


Wilfred Leo Beauregard, Jr. 
Hyman Bebchick 
Francis Patrick Callahan 
Joseph Benedict Gallagher 
Andre Henry Gervais 
Caiman Hoffman 
Douglas Arthur Seed . 
Charles William Simpson 
Claude Alfred Taylor . 


ng — 1 Year. 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Salem, N. H. 

Lowell 

Methuen 





SERIES 38, No. 2 


November , 1934 


BULLETIN 

OF THE 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1934-1935 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized on October 21, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 


2200. 12-’34. Order 3118. 


2 


THE LUBRICATING POWER OF OILS ON WOOL FIBERS 
By John H. Skinkle, S.B., 

Instructor , Chemistry and Textile Coloring Department 
Assisted by Roland C. Morrison, B.T.C. 

The use of oils on scoured wool preparatory to the mechanical processes is in 
general use in the industry for the purpose of reducing the clinging power of the 
fibers for each other to the point where impurities and short fibers ma> be removed 
easily from the longer fibers. Most of the data on the use of oils for wool fiber 
lubrication is concerned with the ease of removal of the oil and the tendency of the 
oil to become rancid, and little or no work has been done on the effects of the oils 
on the lubrication of the fibers. It is generally supposed that olive oil is superior 
to other oils for this purpose, but that mineral oil would be satisfactory provided 
that it could be easily removed afterward; therefore the first work was done in 
the form of a comparison of olive oil and mineral oil. 

For mechanical reasons, the measurement of the coefficient of friction of fiber 
on fiber was impracticable so it was decided to measure the coefficient of friction 
of fibers on glass, glass being selected as being most easily reproducible. The 
apparatus used was a modification of that described by Mercier* and used by him 
to measure the coefficient of friction of fabrics. A simple relationship exists be- 
tween the angle of slide of a material and its coefficient of friction. 

Let p = coefficient of friction 

Let F = frictional resistance acting on a block 

Let N = force normal to the surface 

Let W = weight of the block 

Let A = angle of the inclined plane 


If we assume that a block is resting on an inclined plane so that it is just on the 
point of starting to slide, then the frictional resistance of the block is just equal to 
a moment of the gravitational force parallel to the surface of the plane and 

F = W sin A 


The force normal to the surface of the plane is 
N = W cos A 


By definition, 
Therefore, 


/*= F/N 



W sin A A . 
■iTT i tan A 

W cos A 


The apparatus consists of a baseboard which may be leveled, and hinged to it 
at one end is a board with an inset piece of glass to serve as the inclined plane. 
The angle of the plane was varied by moving a block of steel machined to exactly 
two inches in height along guides lengthwise of the baseboard. The tangent of 
the angle (or coefficient of friction) was then obtained by dividing 2.000 inches by 
the distance from the point of swing to the base of the steel block. . The fibers in 
the form of tops were held lengthwise of a wooden block and covering the bottom 
of the block. 

The block and fibers were placed on the inclined plane and the angle increased to 
the point where, with the assistance of light tappings, the block commenced to 
slide. The angle was then lowered slightly and the process repeated. After each 
determination, the glass plate was cleaned off with a volatile solvent. 

A sample of wool top large enough to give all the samples necessary was obtained 
from the Wool Department and extracted with gasoline until less than 0.1% oil 
was left. Fractions of this top were then soaked in solutions of the oils in petroleum 
ether of such strength as to give a series of values for each oil. 


* “American Wool and Cotton Reporter,” November 13, 1930. 






4 


Preliminary work showed that check results could not be obtained from the first 
slide of the block, presumably because a thin film of oil was then deposited on the 
glass. 

After the determination of the coefficient of friction of each sample of wool, the 
amount of oil present was determined by an extraction in the Soxhlet apparatus. • 
The oils used were of the following properties: 

OLIVE OIL: 

Specific gravity =0.914 at 60° F. 

Viscosit} r = 204 Saybolt seconds at 100° F. 

MINERAL OIL: 

Specific gravity = 0.895 at 60° F. 

Viscosity = 243 Saybolt seconds at 1 00° F. 

The following data were obtained and plotted in the accompanying graph: 


OLIVE OIL MINERAL OIL 


%oil 

Coefficient 

%oil 

Coefficient 

in wool 

of friction 

in wool 

of friction 

0.1 

0.520 

0.1 

0.520 

1.7 

0.513 

1.2 

0.500 

3.3 

0.247 

2.0 

0.315 

3.5 

0.242 

3.3 

0.256 

9.1 

0.247 

6.7 

0.255 

11.2 

0.250 

12.7 

0.276 


CONCLUSIONS 

1 . Practically identical results are obtained for both oils above three per cent. 

2. Below a concentration of three per cent, mineral oil is superior to olive oil 
in lubricating efficiency. 

3. There is no advantage, from the standpoint of lubrication, in adding more 
than 3-4% of either oil. This concentration is apparently enough to give a con- 
tinuous coating to the fibers. 




.. 



SERIES 38, NO 3. 


February , 1935 


BULLETIN 

of the 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1935 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917, authorized October 21, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 


6100. 2-’35. Order 3614, 




CALENDAR 

1934- 1935 

September 13-14, Thursday-Friday . . . Entrance Examinations 

September 17-22, Monday-Saturday . . . Re-examinations 

September 20, Thursday, 9.00 a.m Registration for Freshmen 

September 24, Monday Registration for upper-class students 

Classes begin for Freshmen 

September 25, Tuesday Classes begin for upper-class students 

October 12, Friday Columbus Day — Holiday 

November 12, Monday Holiday — Observance of Armistice 

Day 

November 27, Tuesday, 4.45 p.m Thanksgiving recess begins 

December 3, -Monday, 9.00 a.m Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 21, Friday, 4.45 p.m Christmas recess begins 

January 2, Wednesday, 9.00 a.m Christmas recess ends 

January 14, Monday First term examinations begin 

January 25, Friday End of first term 

January 28, Monday Second term begins 

February 22, Friday Washington’s Birthday — Holiday 

April 12, Friday, 4.45 p.m Spring recess begins 

April 22, Monday, 9.00 a.m Spring recess ends 

May 20, Monday Second term examinations begin 

May 30, Thursday Memorial Day — Holiday 

June 4, Tuesday Commencement 

June 6-7, Thursday-Friday Entrance Examinations 

1935- 1936 

September 12-13, Thursday-Friday . . . Entrance Examinations 

September 16-21, Monday-Saturday . . . Re-examinations 

September 19, Thursday, 9.00 a.m Registration for Freshmen 

September 23, Monday Registration for upper-class students 

Classes begin for Freshmen 

September 24, Tuesday Classes begin for upper-class students 

November 11, Monday Armistice Day — Holiday 

November 26, Tuesday, 4.45 p.m Thanksgiving recess begins 

December 2, Monday, 9.00 a.m Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 20, Friday, 4.45 p.m Christmas recess begins 

January 2, Thursday, 9.00 a.m Christmas recess ends 

January 13, Monday First term examinations begin 

January 24, Friday End of first term 


January 27, Monday 

April 3, Friday, 4.45 p.m 

April 13, Monday, 9.00 a.m 

April 20, Monday 

May 18, Monday 

May 30, Saturday 

June 2, Tuesday 

June 4-5, Thursday-Friday ....... 


Second term begins 
Spring recess begins 
Spring recess ends 
Holiday — Observance of Patriots’ 
Day 

Second-term examinations begin 
Memorial Day — Holiday 
Commencement 
Entrance Examinations 


3 

TRUSTEES OF THE LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

Officers 

ROYAL P. WHITE, Chairman 

FREDERICK A. FLATHER, Vice-Chairman CHARLES H. EAMES, Clerk 

Trustees 

On the Part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Dr. Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 

On the Part of the City of Lowell 
Hon. James J. Bruin, Mayor of Lowell 

For Term ending June 30, 1935 

Frederick A. Flather, Lowell, Treasurer, Boott Mills, Boston corporation, 
mills at Lowell 

Henry A. Bodwell, Andover, Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, Boston, class 
of 1900 

Edward M. Abbot, Westford, Vice-President, Abbot Worsted Company, Granite- 
ville, class of 1904 

Mrs. H. L. Boutwell, 209 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Irving Southworth, Andover, Agent, Pacific Mills, Boston corporation, mills at 
Lawrence 

For Term ending June 30, 1936 
Royal P. White, Lowell, Agent, Stirling Mills, class of 1904 
Edward B. Wentworth, 165 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Philip S. Marden, Lowell, Editor-in-Chief, Courier-Citizen 
Charles W. Churchill, Lowell, Manager, Churchill Manufacturing Company, 
Inc., class of 1906 

Tracy A. Adams, North Adams, Vice-President and General Manager, Arnold 
Print Works, class of 1911 

For Term ending June 30, 1937 

Thomas T. Clark, North Billerica, Treasurer, Talbot Mills, class of 1910 
George M. Harrigan, Lowell, President, Lowell Trust Company 
Stanley H. Wheelock, Uxbridge, President and Treasurer, Stanley Woolen 
Company, class of 1905 

Vincent M. McCartin, Lowell, Superintendent of Public Schools 
John A. Calnin, Lowell, Superintendent of Weaving, United States Bunting 
Company 


Royal P. White 
Frederick A. Flather 

Frederick A. Flather 

Stanley H. Wheelock 

Tracy A. Adams 

Charles W. Churchill 

Frederick A. Flather 

Edward M. Abbot 

George M. Harbiqan 


General Committees 

Finance Committee 

Henry A. Bodwell 

Thomas T. Clark 

Cotton and Knitting 

Irving Southworth 

Woolen and Worsted 

Thomas T. Clark 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Irving Southworth 

Designing and Finishing 
Edward B. Wentworth 

John A. Calnin 

Edward B. Wentworth 

Charles W. Churchill 

Edward M. Abbot 

Stanley H. Wheelock 

Mrs. H. C. Boutwell 

Engineering 

Henry A. Bodwell 

Thomas T. Clark 

Athletics 

Charles W. Churchill 

Philip S. Marden 

Evening School 

Vincent M. McCartin 

James J. Bruin 


4 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 
Charles Holmes Eames, S.B Billerica 

Department rfJSSWIS 

Edgar Harrison Barker. ...... • • • 9 . M°unt H° p e Street 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Wool Yarns^ ^ gtreet 

ART M™Twrin' charg; of D^nt of ^ 

H T£ofTSDS; ‘in charge of Department of Derignand Wea^ng 

LBS ProfesTof ffistoryand Eco^o^csj in charge ofDepartment of Languages 
His tory and Economics; Secretary of the Faculty; Director of Athletics 

„ ^SfSMca . 119 Wentworth Avenue 

Herbert James Ball b.B., B.O.B. V" ’ . . ToYtilo En«- 

Professor of Textile Engineering; in charge of Department of Textile mgi 

neering and Accountancy ,, 

GlLB profSsorof T^xtdes;’i?'chfrge of Department of Cotton Yarns and Knitting 

_ , , North Chelmsford 

Dracut Street 

Ma^W^=OH Terf " eS .... 30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence 

Assistant Professor of Weaving qtr - pf 

Elmer Edward Fickett, BS. 162 Hovey Street 

Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry 

Frederick Steere Beattie, Ph.B. 285 Foster btreet 

Assistant Professor of Orgamc Chemistry 

Harold Canning Chapin, Ph.D. . . 290 Pine btreet 

Assistant Professor^of General Chemistry North Billerica 

Charles Lincoln Howarth, B.I.O 

Assistant Professor of Dyeing 156 Methuen Street 

Percy Charles Judd, B.q. . •.•••. • . * 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineenng Mprrimack Street 

Harry Chamberlain Brown, S.B. ... • • • 272 Merrimack btreet 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics Street 

James Guthrie Dow, A.B. . 

oJSSt R. F. D. No. 1, Lowell 

A aw"S, f BTi fF,m8h, ° 8 . 204 Franklin Street, Melrose Highlands 

KrRTM e “. EDgm “ nnE • • 50 Bradstreet Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Textiles Canton gtreet 

Charles Harrison Jack • • • . 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice Victoria Street 

Ruth Foote, A.B., 

Instructor and Registrar 673 g chool street 

Albert Greaves Sugden 

Instructor in Weaving 41 Morey street 

Arthur Joseph Woodbury 

Instructor in Cotton Yams Beacon Street 

Russell Metcalf Fox . 

Instructor in Textile Design Chelmsford 

Charles Arthur Everett, 

Instructor in Dyeing 


5 


James Harrington Kennedy, Jr 177 A Street 

Instructor in Wool Yarns and Sorting 

William George Chace, Ph.B 7 Sanborn Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

John Leslie Merrill, B.T.E 2026 Middlesex Street 

Instructor in Weaving 

John Henry Skinkle, S.B 7 Sanborn Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Franz Evron Baker, B.T.E Dalton Road, Chelmsford 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Charles Frederick Edlund, B.S 272 Merrimack Street 

Instructor in Sales Engineering 

Milton Hindle, B.T.E 24 Highland Avenue, Melrose Highlands 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

Horton Brown, B.S 178 Atlantic Avenue, Marblehead 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Elmer Percy Trevors 18 Rhodora Street 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Paul David Petterson Chelmsford 

Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

Kenneth Everett Leslie 9 Nineteenth Avenue, Haverhill 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

de Gruchy, James Campbell 61 Pleasant Street, Stoneham 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Robert Frederick Jessen 298 Pawtucket Street 

Assistant Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Emilio Gomez Moreno, Jr 28 Loring Street 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

Walter Ballard Holt 37 Albert Street 

Bursar 

Florence Moore Lancey 46 Victoria Street 

Librarian 

Helen Gray Flack, S.B 445 Stevens Street 

Secretary 

Mona Blanche Palmer 685 Westford Street 

Clerk 

Miriam Kaplan Hoffman, S.B 43 Hawthorn Street 

Clerk 


HISTORICAL SKETCH 
of the 

LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 


of incorporation were s Kte^of the Lowell Textile School of Lowell, 

g trr b TbX"em»r <« «* from 

Sfe “tie Co~Sth otWaJUetts, and the control . md ran*™** 

“Khool was vested in a .Board of •W^,' 'jrirfSS 

all the powers, rights and privileges and subject to all the duties 01 tne orig. 

£SsaS£|p3S 

products of the great Merrimack VaRey textile chstnct^ Wo i cot t on Jan- 

Although the school was formaUyopenedby GovernoKogervv Jan 

SHSSfes 


PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE INSTITUTE 

kindred branches of industry. • • , • 1 1 „ ip„ r i; no - industry of New 

The plan was occasioned by the a PPf“* c ^ 

arts applicable to textile and kindred of these principles in the processes, 

SaMsa 

curriculum, its methods of instruction, a Q P • aI1 j as new demands are 
arose. This objective wdl be floor space. 

S°“f£ i nd poSi.^SS'»Vo experimental work which is of particular 
’•‘CS 5 of “etSd'iTlSd^d charaete, of instruction given, and b« 


i 


7 

of the standing and personnel of the instructing staff, the Institute has been placed 
by both Federal and State educational boards in the class of the higher technological 
schools of this country. 

The United States Civil Service Commission recognizes graduates from the 
degree courses of this school as proper applicants for the examination to the various 
positions requiring a knowledge of applied science and engineering, as well as a 
knowledge of textile manufacturing, in the different departments of the govern- 
ment. 

The day classes have been organized for those who can devote their entire time 
for three or more years to the instruction requisite in preparing to enter the textile 
industries. It has been found necessary to require of all such students educational 
qualifications equivalent to those given by a regular four-year course of a high 
school or academy of good standing. 

The evening classes are held for about twenty weeks of the year, and are for 
those who are unable to attend the day courses. These are similar to the day 
courses, but are aimed especially to meet the needs of students working during 
the day in the mills and shops. For entrance to these classes an applicant should 
have the equivalent of a grammar school education. A detailed description of 
these courses and requirements is given in another Bulletin, which will be sent 
upon request. 


BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The site is a commanding one, consisting of about 15 acres at a high elevation 
on the west bank of the Merrimack River. It extends to and overlooks the rapids 
of Pawtucket Falls, which was the first water power in America to be used on an 
extensive scale to operate power looms. It was contributed by Frederick Fanning 
Ayer, Esq., of New York City, and the Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on the 
Merrimack River. 

Southwick Hall, the main building, fronting on Moody Street, was contributed 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Frederick Fanning Ayer, Esq., and 
is a memorial to Royal Southwick, a leading textile manufacturer, a public man 
of earlier days, and a maternal ancestor of Mr. Ayer. It includes a central mass 
90 by 90 feet, having three stories and two wings 80 by 85 feet each with two 
stories and well-lighted basements. The building is pierced in the center by an 
arched way from which access is had to the wings and to the central courtyard. 
The northern wing is occupied by the General Offices, Engineering and Finishing 
Departments, and Library, while the southern wing is occupied by the Chemistry 
and Dyeing Departments. 

Kitson Hall, dedicated to the memory of Richard Kitson, was contributed by 
Charlotte P. Kitson and Emma K. Stott, his daughters; the Kitson Machine 
Company of Lowell, founded by Mr. Kitson, was also a generous contributor. 
This hall makes a right angle with Southwick Hall, is 70 by 183 feet, has two stories 
and a basement and houses the Cotton Yarn and Knitting Departments, the 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering laboratories and the Machine Shop. 

The Falmouth Street Building forms the third side of the quadrangle, and con- 
sists of three portions, one 60 by 75 feet, three stories, one 75 by 130 feet, three 
stories, and the head house 70 by 80 feet, three stories and basement. The build- 
ing is occupied by the picker section of the Cotton Yarn Department, the Design 
and Power Weaving Department and by the Woolen and Worsted Yarn Depart- 
ment, and contains on the lower floors an equipment for the manufacture of wool 
yarn from the fleece to the finished yarn: The upper floors are occupied by a great 
variety of plain, dobby and Jacquard looms, and in a section of the building are 
the students 1 lockers and recreation rooms. 

Colonial Avenue Building was erected in the summer of 1910 from plans pre- 
pared by the Engineering Department, which also had in charge the work of 
construction. The building completes the fourth side of the quadrangle, and in 
outward appearance corresponds to the architectural features of the other school 
buildings. It is a single-story building, and has the dimensions of 195 by 60 feet. 
Its interior is faced with cement brick made at the school during the progress of the 
work. These serve to give light-reflecting walls which are advantageous for the 
work of the Wool Manufacturing, Cotton Finishing and Chemistry and Dyeing 


Departments that occupy this building. The funds for this building were provided 

bv the State of Massachusetts. , , 

The buildings are of modem mill construction adapted to educational uses and 

contain approximately 180,563 square feet. 

CAMPUS 

Through the generosity of Mr. Frederick Fanning Ayer the Institute has been 
provided^ with a campus and athletic field of about 3 acres. This has been care- 
fully graded and laid out for baseball, football and track athletics. 

To enclose this field the Alumni Class Fence has been partly built. It is made 
of forged iron sections supported between brick columns. Each section is con- 
tributed by a class, so that in the course of a few years this fence will entirely 

^Onthe floor of the Falmouth Street Building there has been provided a 

recreation room for the use of the students at such times as their attendance is 

n0 In\Te ir basement S of this building there are rooms for the use of the athletic 
teams Connected to these are showers and dressing rooms. 

The upper hall of Southwick Hall has been equipped with gymnastic apparatus. 
Chest wdghts, wooden dumb-bells, Indian clubs, a set of traveling rings, a vaulting 
horse, parallel bars, a punching bag and several sets of foils and single sticks have 

b6 In order 1 to be sure that no student having any dangerous physical weakness 
takes part in any athletic contest, all candidates for the various athletic teams 
are obliged to pass a satisfactory physical examination. 


9 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Particular stress should be laid upon a thorough grounding in mathematics, 
including algebra, arithmetic and plane geometry, as these form the basis upon 
which the work of this school rests. While solid geometry is not required at the 
present time, the student will find a knowledge of this subject very valuable in his 
subsequent work, and is strongly recommended to include this subject as one of 
his electives. A preliminary course in science, including physics and chemistry, 
serves to prepare the student’s mind for the higher branches of these subjects and 
their application, but neither will be considered as the equivalent of the courses in 
these branches given in the Institute. 

Degree Courses 

Candidates for admission to either of the degree courses must be graduates of 
a school approved by the New England College Entrance Certificate Board or 
by the board of Regents of New York, and must present a certificate from the 
principal of the school last attended, reporting upon the subjects pursued and 
the points obtained according to the schedule of studies given hereafter. A total 
of fifteen points is required. 

A point represents satisfactory work in a year’s study in a specified subject in 


an approved secondary school. 

Required Subjects 

Algebra A1 . • 1 

Algebra A2 1 

English 4 

Language other than English 2 

Plane Geometry 1 

History (American, Medieval and Modern, or English) 1 

Physics 1 


11 


Elective Subjects 


Points 


Chemistry 1 

Elementary French (two years) orl 2 

Elementary German (two years) J 

Advanced French or German (one year in addition to requirements of Ele- 
mentary French A or Elementary German A) 1 

History: 

American 1 

Medieval and Modern 1 

English 1 

Latin 1 

Mechanical Drawing 1 

Mechanic Arts 1 

Solid Geometry 1 

Spanish 1 

Trigonometry 1 


An applicant may also be admitted on the basis of entrance examinations, in 
which case he must pass a sufficient number of the required subjects to make 
ten points and present certificates showing satisfactory courses in such of the 
elective subjects to make three additional points. 

The objective of the elective requirements is to encourage greater breadth of 
preparation than that covered by the required branches. Certificates covering 
other subjects than those listed as elective will be entertained. 


Diploma Courses 

Candidates for admission to the diploma courses are accepted upon presentation 
of properly vouched certificates showing the completion of a regular four-year 
course in a high school or academy of reputable standing. The certificate must 
specify that the applicant has satisfactorily passed the required subjects. 

A total of twelve points is required. 


10 

Required Subjects 


Algebra A1 
Algebra A2 
English 


Plane Geometry , • • * * *. 

History (American, Medieval and Modern, or English) 

Physics 


Points 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 


Elective Subjects 

Three may be selected from the list under Degree Courses. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

All students who are unable to present a certificate for either thedegreeorthe 
diploma courses must pass entrance examinations. Notification of mtention to 
take these examinations must be made in wjiting at least a week before the date 
of the examinations. These will be held as follows: 

Thursday, June 6, 1935; Thursday, September 12, 1935; Thursday, June 4, 1936:- 
Algebra, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

History, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

English, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Friday, June 7, 1935; Friday, September 13, 1935; Friday, June 5, 1936:— 

Plane Geometry, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

German or French, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Physics, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Candidates failing to pass the June examinations are allowed to try again in 
September; those who cannot attend the June examinations may present them- 
selves in September. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS FOR ENTRANCE 
Algebra Al. — Derivation and use of simple formulas, graphical representation, 
the meaning and use of negative numbers, linear equations with one or two un- 
known quantities, ratio and proportion, the essentials of algebraic techmque, 
simple cases of exponents and radicals. . 

Algebra A2— Numerical and literal quadratic equations in one unknown 
Quantity, the binomial theorem for positive integral exponents, arithmetic and 
geometric series, simultaneous linear equations in ^ r . ee \ ’ 

simultaneous equations consisting of one quadratic and including graphical 

^Plan^Geometoy.— ' Theusual theorems and constructions of good textbooks, 
including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures, the ^circle and l th 
measurement of angles, similar polygons, areas, regular po * mensura tion 

ment of the circle. The solution of original problems and problems in mensuration 

° f English!— As ^econd^y schools are following to a . greaterextent thanhere- 
tofore the requirements of the College Entrance Exammation Boa^ 
mended that the applicant to this school conform to the suggestions of this Board 
relative to English composition and literature. . „ . .. „ . 

The examination consists of two parts, both of which are given at the sam 

tU ?a) With the object of testing the student’s ability to express his Noughts 
in writing clearly and correctly he will be required to write upon subjects familiar 
to Win EmpSsis will be laid upon the composition punctuation grammar 
idiom and formation of paragraphs. He will be judged by how well he wn 
rather^han^by how^much Jie examination Js prepare d with the vie w °[, a . SC p^nmg 

the extent of the student’s knowledge of good literature ^ and to > test this 
tion questions will be based on the books adopted by Natema C^erence 
Uniform Entrance Requirements. Any course of equivalent amount if made up 
of standard works will be accepted. 


11 

History. — Applicants may offer a preparation of American history, English 
history, or medieval and modern history. 

In American history applicants should be familiar with the early settlements 
in America, the colonies, their government, the customs of the people, and events 
which led to the establishment of the United States. They should be informed 
concerning the causes and effects of the principal wars in which the country has 
been involved. They should be prepared to consider also questions requiring an 
elementary knowledge of civil government, as well as historical facts connected 
with the growth of this country up to the present time. 

For the subject of English history or medieval and modern history the course 
given in any reputable secondary school should give proper preparation. A course 
extending over a full year with not less than three periods a week will be accepted. 

Physics. — The applicant should be familiar with the fundamental principles of 
physics, particularly those considered under the headings of mechanics, heat, light, 
electricity and magnetism. Textbook instruction should be supplemented by 
lecture table experiments. Wherever possible, the student should pursue a lab- 
oratory course, but for the present no applicant will be conditioned in this subject 
if he has not been able to carry on a laboratory course. Where a laboratory course 
is offered by a secondary school, it should cover at least twenty-five of those exper- 
iments listed in the syllabus of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Modern Languages. — Required for degree courses only. It is expected that 
the work in these subjects has covered a period of at least two years of preparatory 
school training or the equivalent. Importance should be given to the ability to 
translate into good idiomatic English, but attention should also be paid to gram- 
mar and construction, that greater care may be used in translation. 

Elementary German A. — The entrance examination is composed of two 
parts, both taken, however, at the same time. 

(а) Translation of simple German prose into good idiomatic English. 

(б) Questions to test proficiency in grammar, and simple English sentences to 
be rendered into German. 

The requirements include the declension of articles, adjectives, pronouns and 
nouns; the conjugation and inflection of weak and strong verbs; the simpler uses 
of the subjunctive; the use of the modal auxiliaries; the prepositions and their 
uses; the principal parts of important verbs; and the elementary rules of syntax 
and word order. 

Texts used in the language courses of any reputable high or preparatory school 
will furnish reading for translation. A fist of texts is offered by the College En- 
trance Examination Board. 

Elementary French A. — The entrance examination is composed of two parts, 
both taken, however, at the same time. 

(a) Translation of simple French prose into good idiomatic English. 

(b) Questions to test proficiency in grammar, and simple English sentences 
to be rendered into French. 

The requirements include the principal parts, conjugation and inflection of the 
regular and the more common irregular verbs; the singular and plural forms of 
nouns and adjectives; the uses of articles and partitive construction; the forms 
and positions of personal pronouns; and the simpler uses of the conditional and 
subjunctive. 

Suitable texts are suggested by the language courses of any reputable high or 
preparatory school and by the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

Students who have pursued two years of elementary French as well as two 
years of elementary German may present one subject to cover two points in the 
required subjects, and the other to cover two points in the elective subjects. 

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

History. — If the applicant can present all three or any two branches of history 
specified he may include one as a required subject and the others in the list of 
elective subjects 

Chemistry. — Applicants must show evidence of their familiarity with the 
rudiments of chemistry. Any course given in a secondary school organized to 


12 

present instruction by means of textbook or lecture, together with correlated 
laboratory work, will be considered as covering the requirements. The applicant’s 
notebook with his original notes, including description of experiment, apparatus 
used, reactions, observations and deductions, must be accompanied by his in- 
structor’s certificate. 

Importance will be placed upon manipulation and deductions as well as the 
general appearance and neatness of the notebook. 

Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good textbooks, 
including the relations of planes and fines in space, the properties and measure- 
ment of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones; the sphere and spherical triangles. 
The solution of original problems and the applications of the mensuration of 
surfaces and solids. 

Trigonometry. — The usual courses of instruction covered by the standard 
textbooks on plane and spherical trigonometry will prepare an applicant suf- 
ficiently to meet this requirement. 

Mechanical Drawing. — The applicant must have pursued such a course in 
mechanical drawing that he will be familiar with the usual geometrical construction 
problems, projection of points, fines, planes and simple solids. 

Importance is laid not only upon the accuracy with which the work is per- 
formed, but upon the general arrangement, appearance and care with which 
the plates are executed. 

It should not be understood that work in this subject may be offered as the 
equivalent of the first term’s work at the Institute. 

Mechanics Arts. — The usual courses offered by properly equipped preparatory 
schools will be accepted as suitable fulfilment of this requirement. Work should 
include instruction in the handling of both wood and metal working tools in the 
more simple practices of these arts. 

Elementary French B. — Applicants who enter for one of the three-year 
courses may present one year’s work in French in a secondary school. Those 
who present themselves for examination in this subject should be familiar with 
the rudiments of grammar, and be able to translate simple French prose into 
good idiomatic English, also to translate into French English sentences, based on 
the French given for translation. 

Elementary German B. — Applicants who enter for one of the three-year 
courses may present one year’s work in German in a secondary school. What is 
stated in regard to French applies to those who may present German instead of 
French. 

Advanced French or German. — In cases where applicants have pursued 
courses in French or German for more than two years, and have completed work 
which is more advanced than is included under elementary French or German 
they may offer the additional year as an elective. 

Spanish. — Students offering Spanish should be familiar with elementary 
grammar, the common irregular verbs, and be able to translate simple Spanish to 
English or English to Spanish. A preparation equivalent to three periods per 
week for two years will be acceptable. 

Latin. — Students who have pursued one or more years of Latin may pre- 
sent this subject as an elective. Each year’s work satisfactorily completed will 
be considered equal to one point. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates who may have received previous training in any of the subject 
scheduled in the regular course will, upon presentation of acceptable certificate 
be given credit for such work. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

By Act of the Legislature of 1935 this Institute may grant the degrees of 
Master of Science in Textile Chemistry and Master of Science in Textile Engi- 
neering. A student must hold a Bachelor’s degree to be eligible for these courses. 
In general it will require one-year’s resident work for graduates of this Institute 
and two-years’ work for applicants from other institutions. The courses required 
will depend upon the preparation of the student. 


13 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Degree Courses. — The four-year degree courses are as follows: 

Textile Engineering. 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring. 

At the completion of these courses the degrees of Bachelor of Textile Engineering 
(B.T.E.) and Bachelor of Textile Chemistry (B.T.C.) are conferred. 

Five options are offered in the Engineering Course, viz., general textile, cotton 
manufacturing, wool manufacturing, design, or sales option. Each of these courses 
is planned to train one in the fundamental principles of science found to be appli- 
cable in the particular fields of textile chemistry and textile engineering. It is 
maintained that for one to be succcessul in either of these important branches of 
industry a training is required as thorough and broad as that of any of the recog- 
nized branches of engineering or of applied science. 

With this in mind these courses have been built of a secure framework of science 
and mathematics, and to it has been added the useful application of these branches 
in the broad textile field. With the direct purpose of laying a secure foundation 
in the training, a more extended preparatory course is first demanded, and subse- 
quently in the school work more subjects of a general character are included, that 
narrowness of judgment and observation may not result by overstimulation of the 
technical development. 

Diploma Courses. — The following courses extend over a period of three years 
and upon the completion of any one of these the diploma of the Institute is awarded: 

Cotton Manufacture. 

Wool Manufacture. 

Textile Design. 

These are the original courses offered at the Institute, arranged to require three 
years* study and to give the student as thorough a training as possible for his 
chosen field, stressing particularly the study of textiles. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Although all classes are open to women, the courses which have appealed es- 
pecially to their tastes have been textile designing and decorative art. Some have 
pursued courses in chemistry, and have added to their work in design some in- 
struction in power weaving and finishing. In general these special courses have 
been followed for three years and in some cases have led the students to positions 
either in the mill office or in some commercial lines that have been desirable and 
have offered congenial work. 

Within the last few years the possibilities for women in certain branches of 
textile chemistry have become recognized and it is believed that in the future 
the positions open to them will become more and more numerous. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application for Admission. — A blank form of application for admission may 
be found at the end of this bulletin. This should be properly filled out by all ap- 
plicants, whether entering upon certificate from a secondary school or presenting 
themselves for examination. 

Freshman Registration. — Each freshman is expected to be in daily attendance 
beginning Thursday, September 19, at 9.00 a.m., and to follow the prepared program 
which will be placed in his hands. A program which is planned to acquaint the 
new student with the institution, its location and surroundings, its courses of 
instruction, its recreational activities and other phases of its life is arranged for 
the opening week. Unless arrangements for room and board are made previously, 
the first two days of the week may be used for this purpose. Physical examinations 
as well as certain other tests are given during this orientation period. Freshman 
week enables the student to secure the advantages which come from acquaintance 
with his surroundings, his instructors, the members of his class, student organiza- 
tions, activities and customs. The overcrowding of the first week of classes with 
distractions is thus avoided. 

Registration. — All upper classmen are required to register on or before the 
Monday of the week beginning the school year, and all students during the midyear 
examination period. For unexcused delay in registration a fee of $5 will be imposed. 


14 

Sessions. — The regular school sessions are in general from 9.00 a.m. to 
12.50 p.m., and from 1.55 to 4.45 p.m., except Saturdays, when no classes are held. 
On Saturday afternoons the buildings are closed. 

An hour plan designates the hours at which the various classes meet. This is 
rigidly adhered to, and the student is marked for his attendance and work as 
therein scheduled. 

Attendance. — Attendance is required of all students on fourteen-fifteenths 
of all scheduled class exercises, provided they meet the requirements of their 
instructors for the omitted exercises. For every unexcused absence from any class 
exercise in excess of those allowed, a deduction from the mark obtained in the 
course in which the absences occurred will be made. 

Advisers. — Advisers are appointed for all students, to be of such aid and as- 
sistance as they can both inside and outside of school hours. The head of the 
department in which a student is registered is adviser to upper-classmen, and 
instructors in charge of freshmen classes act as advisers to freshmen. 

Conduct. — Students are required to return to the proper place all instru- 
ments or apparatus used in experimental work, and to leave clean and in working 
order all machinery and apparatus with which they may experiment. All break- 
ages, accidents or irregularities of any kind must be reported immediately to the 
head of the department or instructor in charge. 

Irregular attendance, lack of punctuality, neglect of either school or home work, 
disorderly or ungentlemanly conduct or general insubordination are considered 
good and sufficient reasons for the immediate suspension of a student, and a report 
to the trustees for such action as they deem necessary to take. 

It is the aim of the trustees so to administer the discipline of the Institute as to 
maintain a high standard of integrity and a scrupulous regard for trust. The 
attempt of any student to present, as his own, work which he has not performed, 
or to pass an examination by improper means, is regarded by the trustees as a 
most serious offense, and renders the offender liable to immediate suspension or 
expulsion. The aiding or abetting of a student in any dishonesty is also held to 
be a grave breach of discipline. 

Any student who violates these provisions will be immediately suspended by 
the president, and the case reported at the following meeting of the trustees for 
action. 

Examinations. — For first-year students examinations are held every five 
weeks, and these serve to inform the student concerning his standing and the 
progress made. 

For students in upper classes examinations will be held during the eighth week 
of each term. 

Final examinations are held at the end of each term. 

In general, the examinations cover the work of the preceding term, but at the 
discretion of the instructor may include work of earlier terms. 

Examinations for students conditioned in first-term subjects are held during 
the second term, and examinations for students conditioned in the second-term 
subjects are held in September following. Students requesting condition examina- 
tions at other than scheduled dates will be required to pay $5 for each examination 
so taken. 

Any student who fails to complete a subject satisfactorily or to clear a condition 
at the time appointed, will be required to repeat the subject, and he cannot be 
admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

A student whose term’s standing is as a whole so low that he cannot continue 
with profit the work of the next term will be required to leave, but he may return 
the following year to repeat such subjects as are required. 

Daily work and regularity of attendance are considered in making up the reports 
of standing. 

Records and Reports of Standing. — During each term informal reports are 
sent to parents or guardians of all students under age, and to all students; and 
at the end of each term formal reports are made. 

The daily work of the student forms an important part of his record, and no 
pupil will be awarded the diploma or degree unless this portion of his record is 
clear. 


15 

Books are prescribed for study, for entry of lecture notes and other exercises, 
and are periodically examined by the lecturers. The care and accuracy with which 
these books are kept are considered in determining standing. 

Thesis. — Each candidate for the degree of the Institute must file with the head 
of the department in which the thesis is taken, and not later than May 15, a report 
of original investigation or research, written on a good quality of paper, 8 % by 11 
inches, with one-inch margin at left, and one-half inch at right, of each page; such 
thesis to have been previously approved by the head of the department in which 
it is made. 

For all candidates for the diploma this requirement will be optional on the 
part of the Institute. 

Library and Reading Room. — That the students may have surroundings 
conducive to reading and study a moderate-sized reading room with library tables 
and chairs has been provided. The library shelves contain textile, art, engineering 
and scientific publications. These are increased from time to time as new technical 
books of value to textile students are issued from the press. The leading textile 
papers are kept on file for ready reference. 

FEES, DEPOSITS, ETC. 

Tuition Fee. — The fee for the day course is $150 per year for residents of Massa- 
chusetts. For non-residents the fee for all courses is $200 per year. The fee for 
students from foreign countries is $300 per year. 

Three-fifths of the fee is charged for a single term. Each term’s tuition is payable 
during the first week of that term. Students failing to make this payment at 
the specified time will be excused from classes until satisfactory explanation and 
arrangements for payment can be made. After payment is made no fee or part 
thereof can be returned, except by special action of the trustees. 

Special students pay, in general, the full fee, but if a course be taken involving 
attendance at the school during a limited time, application may be made to the 
president for a reduction. 

Students entering from Massachusetts are required to file with the Bursar a 
statement signed by either town or city clerk, stating that the applicant’s father is 
a legal resident of Massachusetts. 

Athletic Fee. — An athletic fee of $15 is due and payable at the time of the first 
payment of tuition. 

Deposits. — For all first-year students a minimum deposit of $25 is required to 
cover the cost of breakage, supplies, apparatus and chemicals used in the Chemical 
Laboratory, the unexpended balance to be returned to the student at the end 
of the year. For all students in second, third, and fourth years taking work in 
Chemistry and Dyeing Laboratories a deposit of $25 for the first term and $25 
for the second term is required. 

Students taking Machine Shop will be required to make deposit of $15 to cover 
cost of materials, supplies and breakage. Included in this charge is a kit of tools 
which is essential to the work and which becomes the personal property of the 
student. The unexpended balance will be returned at the end of the year. 

Students not taking Chemistry Laboratory or Machine Shop will be required 
to make a deposit of $10 each year to cover general breakage. The unexpended 
balance will be returned at the end of the year. 

All deposits must be made before students can be admitted for laboratory work. 

Rooms and Board. — Students from a distance, requiring rooms and board in 
the city, may, if they desire, select same from a list which is kept at the Institute. 
The cost of rooms and board in a good district is $12 per week and upwards. 

Books and Materials. — Students must provide their own books, stationery, 
tools, etc., and pay for any breakage or damage that they cause. The above fee 
includes free admission for any day students desiring to attend any of the evening 
classes in which there is accommodation. 

Each student must provide himself with proper outer garments and wear them 
in such a manner when working in the various laboratories that clothing and per- 
son will be protected and not endangered by moving machinery or chemicals. 

All raw stock and yarn furnished to the students, and all the productions of the 
Institute, remain or become its property, except by special arrangement; but each 
student is allowed to retain specimens of yarn or fabrics that he has produced, if 


16 

mounted *and tabulated in accordance with the requirements of the department. 
It is understood that the department may retain such specimens of students’ work 
as they may determine. 

Lockers, sufficiently capacious to contain clothing, books and tools, are provided 
for the use of the students. 

No books, instruments or other property of the Institute are loaned to the stu- 
dents to be removed from the premises except by special permission. 


Summary of Expenses per Year 

Tuition (residents of Massachusetts) $150 

Tuition (residents of other States) 200 

Tuition (foreigners) 300 

Chemistry laboratory deposit (1st year) 25 

Chemistry laboratory deposit (2d, 3d and 4th years) 50 

Athletic fee 15 

Machine shop deposit 15 

General breakage fee 10 

(This applies to students who do not take chemistry or machine 
shop.) 

Books and supplies 50 

(Books and supplies for the first year cost about $80, second and 
third year $35, and fourth year $50, thus averaging about $50 per 
year for the four years.) 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 


Louis A. Olney Book Prizes. — Prizes in the form of books are awarded each 
year to the successful candidate on graduation day. The conditions in detail 
are as follows : — 

First . — Ten dollars to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship 
in first-year chemistry. 

Second . — Five dollars to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the second highest 
scholarship in first-year chemistry. 

Third . — Ten dollars to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile Color- 
ing Course who shall be considered as having obtained the highest scholarship 
during his second year. 

Fourth . — Five dollars to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the second highest 
scholarship during his second year. 

Fifth . — Ten dollars to the student graduating from the Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course, who, in the opinion of the instructing staff of the department, 
shall have maintained the highest scholarship throughout the course. 

The above-mentioned sums are to be invested in books which may be selected 
after graduation. In case no one is considered worthy of any particular scholar- 
ship prize, or if there is no competition, the same may be withheld. The decision 
in such case shall rest with the judges. 

The National Association of Cotton Manufacturers Medal. — The Na- 
tional Association of Cotton Manufacturers offers a medal to that member of the 
graduating class who, during his course, shall have attained the highest standing in 
special subjects required by the vote of the association. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

School Publications. — The Text is issued bi-weekly and it contains news per- 
taining to activities in the Institute as well as information concerning alumni. The 
Pickout is an annual publication in charge of a manager and editor selected from 
the senior class. The board is composed of representatives from the various classes. 

Fraternities. — There are four fraternities, three of which are national and one 
is local. They afford opportunity for social life desired in a college career. 

Dramatic Club. — The Dramatic Club gives annually a theatrical program at 
the Lowell Auditorium. Appropriation is made from the profits to the treasury 
of the Athletic Association. 


17 

Professional Clubs. — A Student Section of the American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers holds meetings regularly in accordance with requirements of the 
national organization. The Student Section of the American Society of Dyers and 
Colorists holds meetings at which papers are delivered or speakers come from outside 
the school organization. 

Rifle Club. — The rifle club offers opportunity to all students to attain proficiency 
in marksmanship and selects the team for interscholastic matches with other col- 
leges. 

Honor Society. — To degree candidates who have maintained a high scholar- 
ship for three years’ work, or who have met with certain similar requirements, is 
accorded the honor of membership in the society Tau Epsilon Sigma. Relatively 
a membership in this society corresponds to that in some of the well-known honor 
societies of the liberal arts and scientific colleges. It requires constant attendance 
and application to the work of the course for any student to reach the scholarship 
level entitling him to this membership. 

Honor Roll. — The President’s List includes upper classmen taking a regular 
course who have a general average of eighty percent and no deficiencies. 

Student Book Store. — A book store is operated on the cooperative plan 
by the Lowell Textile Associates, Inc., for the benefit and convenience of stu- 
dents who desire to purchase books, supplies, and other materials for use in 
connection with their work. It is conducted by a manager and two clerks, all 
of whom are undergraduates. The general business policy is under the control 
and supervision of a member of the Faculty. Any student may become an associ- 
ate member of the Lowell Textile Associates, Inc., upon payment of the required 
fee and is thereby entitled to discount privileges when purchasing from the Book 
Store and from certain firms in the city of Lowell. 


18 

Alumni Association. — The Alumni Association of the Institute holds its 
annual meeting and banquet in May of each year.* 

The membership of the association is composed of graduates of the day courses 
and is open to any non-graduate who has attended the Institute for at least one 
year. 

Officers for the Year 1934-35 
Harry F. Finlay, TO, President 
Harry W Martin, Tl, Vice-President 
Arthur A. Stewart, *00, Secretary-Treasurer 
Communications should be addressed to Arthur A. Stewart, Lowell Textile 
Institute. 


Ex-Officio Members of Executive Committee 
Edward M. Abbot, ’04 Thomas T. Clark, TO 

Henry A. Bodwell, '00 Tracy A. Adams, Tl 

Charles W. Churchill, *06 Stanley H. Wheelock, *05 

Royal P. White, *04 


Executive Committee 
15 Members 

Roy H. Bradford, '06 Thomas Joy, *26 

Alexander Campbell, '23 Arnold J. Midwood, ’05 

Earl W. Clark, T8 Brackett Parsons, '20 

James F. Dewey, *04 Richard W. Rawhnson, *31 

Russell T. Fisher, T4 Everett B. Rich, Tl 

Ohn D. Gay, *08 Dean W. Symmes, *22 

Frederic S. Gilley, T6 J. Milton Washburn, *21 

A. Edwin Wells, *20 


19 


SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 

In the column headed “Hours of Exercise” the numbers represent for each 
particular subject the total hours required in school for a period of fifteen weeks. 

The letter and number which follow the subjects indicate the department in 
which the subject is given and the number of the subject in that department. For 
detailed description of the same, see page 34. 

The departments are indicated as follows: — 


Textile Engineering .... B 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring . C 

Textile Design and Power Weaving D 

Languages and History ... E 


Cotton Yarns F 

Woolen and Worsted Yarns . . G 

Finishing H 


By referring to the letter and number indicated under “Preparation” the student 
can ascertain what subjects are necessary in order that he may have a clear under- 
standing of the subject which he is scheduled to take. 


First Year 
First Term 

(Common to all Courses) 


Hours of 

, Exercise 

Elementary Chemistry C-10 105 

English E-10 45 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanical Drawing B-13 135 

Physics B-ll 75 

Physical Education 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis D-10 75 

Second Term 

Course Course 

IV VI 

Elementary Chemistry OlO 75 75 

Elementary German E-ll 30 

English E-10 45 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 or B-13a 45 120 

Mathematics B-10 60 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 60 

Physical Education 30 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-ll or C-lla 150 45 

Stoichiometry C-12 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis D-10 - 90 


For second-term subjects in Courses I, II, and III, see pages 21, 23, 25. 


20 


Course I. — Cotton Manufacture 

The Cotton Manufacturing Course is designed for students contemplating a 
career in the manufacturing of cotton yarns, cloth or allied industries, and wishing 
to devote but three years to instruction at the Institute. 

During the first term the studies are common to all courses, and include in- 
struction in mathematics, mechanical drawing, physics, textile design and ele- 
mentary chemistry. 

During the second term, lectures in organic chemistry are given followed by 
lectures in textile chemistry and dyeing the second year. The work in mechanism 
serves as a basis for all future machine and mechanical work, and is followed by 
steam engineering, electricity and mill engineering. The course in textile designing, 
cloth analysis and cloth construction includes lectures on plain, fancy and Jacquard 
weaves, the analysis of all commercial fabrics, and designs for the same. 

Power weaving is taken up during the second and third years. Commencing 
with lectures and practice upon plain looms, the instruction continues with dobby, 
box-loom, and Jacquard weaving. 

A course in knitting taken during the third year includes the manufacture of 
flat goods, hosiery and underwear. Considerable laboratory practice accompanies 
the lecture work, giving the students actual working knowledge of a wide range of 
knitting machines. Instruction in the finishing of cotton fabrics is given by lectures 
and laboratory work, and requires considerable work on standard machines in the 
laboratory. Textile testing, also given in the third year, instructs the student in 
standard methods for physical testing of textile material. 

The course in cotton carding is given in the second year. The instruction 
covers the production of cotton throughout the world, the classing of various cot- 
tons and the various methods of marketing the cotton crop. Particular emphasis 
is given to the American cotton crop. The treatment of cotton in the mill processes 
covers all the operations preparatory to spinning, for the regular cotton system 
and for the cotton waste systems. Opening, picking, carding, combing, drawing 
and roving are the operations included. Lectures supplement the material available 
in text books in order to have the course up to date. Considerable time is spent in 
the laboratory studying cotton fibers, classing, processing stock and making various 
tests on the adjustment of machines and the effect on the quality of the work 
produced. 

The third year's work continues that of the second year, with detailed study of 
spinning, spooling, twisting and winding. Another course gives instruction in mill 
organization, balancing and arranging machinery in the mill. Finally, a brief 
course is given in the use of the microscope and camera in studying various prob- 
lems in cotton manufacture. Laboratory practice supplements the lecture course, 
giving practical operation, adjustment and observation of the machines studied. 
Advanced laboratory work illustrates the methods of study and analysis of the 
more general and complex problems such as are usually handled in the laboratory 
of a textile plant. 

During both the second and third years, particular attention is given to the 
preparation of the various reports in order that the student may learn proper 
methods for presenting data and conclusions resulting from mill studies and tests. 

During the third year, each student makes some original study, usually of a 
technical nature. He must make a formal report of this study satisfactory to the 
faculty before receiving his diploma. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


. 


21 


Course I. — Cotton Manufacture 

[For first term see page 19] 


First Year. 

Elementary Chemistry C-10 
English E-10 .... 

Machine Drawing B-13 
Mathematics B-10 . 

Mechanism B-12 . . . 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20 . 240 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 ... .90 

Steam Engineering B-24 ... 30 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20 . 225 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 150 


Third Year. 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 75 

Cotton Organization F-32 ... 60 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30 . 165 
Electricity B-31a 30 

Third Year. 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30 . 210 
Knitting F-31 120 


(Hours of Exercise) 

Physical Education 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla . . 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 
D-10 90 


First Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20 90 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C— 20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20 75 

First Term 

Mill Engineering B-34a ... 30 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 135 

Textile Testing G-31 .... 30 

Thesis F-34. 

Second Term 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 120 

Thesis F-34. 


Second Term. 
75 
45 

. 120 
. 60 
. 60 


22 


Course II, — Wool Manufacture 

The course on wool manufacturing is arranged for those who contemplate a 
career in the manufacture of woolen or worsted fabrics, and can devote but three 
years to the school work. It includes instruction on all of the varied processes 
employed in manipulating the wool fiber to produce yarn and cloth, namely, sort- 
ing, scouring, carding, combing, spinning, designing, weaving, dyeing and finishing. 
The work is carried on by lectures, recitations and practical work in the laboratories. 

Beginning with the second year the details of manipulating wool from the grease 
to the finished yarn is taken up for close study. This includes the spinning of 
woolen yarn, also worsted yarn, by both the English and the French systems. 
The intermediate processes of sorting, scouring, carding, combing and top-manu- 
facturing are taken in detail and in proper sequence. 

The general chemistry of the first year is followed by a lecture course in the 
second year on textile chemistry and dyeing. 

Textile design, cloth analysis and construction are continued from the first 
year throughout the course, the work being applied especially to woolen and 
worsted goods. Weaving on power looms commences in the second year and con- 
tinues through the third. 

A course in knitting taken during the third year includes the manufacture of 
flat goods, hosiery and underwear. Considerable laboratory practice accompanies 
the lecture work, giving the students actual working knowledge of a wide range of 
knitting machines. 

Lectures on finishing commence with the third year and are augmented by 
extensive practice with the machines in the Finishing Department. 

Work in the Engineering Department extends throughout all three years, and 
includes mechanical drawing, steam engineering and electricity. The practical 
application of the principles studied in these subjects is brought out forcibly in the 
work on mill engineering, where mill design and construction are considered. A 
short course covering methods employed in the testing of fibers, yarns, and cloths, 
together with laboratory work in the manipulation of certain physical apparatus, 
is given in the third year. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


23 


Course II. — Wool Manufacture 


[For first term see page 19] 


First Year. Second Term. 


Elementary Chemistry 0-10 . . 75 

English E-10 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 . . . 120 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 

Second Year. 

Fiber Preparation G-20-21 . . 240 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 
Steam Engineering B-24 ... 30 

Second Year. 
Fiber Preparation G-20-21 . . 270 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 120 

Third Year. 

Electricity B-31a 30 

Mill Engineering B-34a ... 30 

Power Weaving D-32 . . . .|135 

Third Year. 

Knitting F-31 120 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 105 


Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 


(Hours of Exercise) 

Physical Education ..... 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla . . 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 

90 


First Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Lect. C— 20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 75 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 60 

First Term 

Textile Testing G-31 .... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 225 
Second Term 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 225 
Thesis. 


D-10 


75 


24 


Course III. — Textile Design 

The general course in textile design is planned to meet the demand of young 
men for a technical training in the general processes of textile manufacturing, 
but with particular reference to the design and construction of fabrics. To this 
end a foundation is laid in the first year by instruction in the elementary principles 
of designing, decorative art and weaving. That he may later in the course pursue 
to advantage instruction in yarn manufacturing, weaving, dyeing, finishing and 
some engineering problems, a foundation course in mechanics, mathematics and 
chemistry is laid. As the student is required to pursue courses in the yarn de- 
partments, both cotton and wool, he acquires a knowledge of the manufacture of 
cotton yarns from the bale to the yarn, and of woolen and worsted yarns from 
the fleece through the varied processes of manufacturing woolen yarn or worsted 
yarn by both the French and Bradford systems. 

Throughout his entire course he receives instruction in design, cloth analysis 
and construction of all the standard cloths, viz., trouserings, coatings, suitings, 
blankets, velvets, corduroys, plushes, etc. This is followed by advanced work 
in Jacquard designing and weaving, which serves not only to acquaint the student 
with the many kinds of cotton, woolen, worsted and silk fabrics of figured design, 
but stimulates and develops any artistic talent he may possess. Decorative art 
becomes an important part of the work of the second and third years. 

The course in general inorganic and organic chemistry of the first year leads 
to the subject of textile chemistry and dyeing in the second year. 

Power weaving commences with the second year and continues throughout 
the course, and work on all types of looms is required. 

During the third year the student receives instruction in the finishing of cotton 
goods and woolen and worsted cloths. This instruction is given by means of 
lecture and laboratory work. 

The engineering subjects given in the second and third years are intended to 
acquaint the student with such general knowledge as will be of assistance should 
he be called upon in later life to be a mill manager, or should his subsequent progress 
lead to some executive position in the operation of a textile plant. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


25 


Course III.— Textile Design 

[For first term see page 19] 

First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry C-10 . . 75 

English E-10 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 . . . 120 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 

Second Year, 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 90 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 90 

Steam Engineering B-24 ... 30 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20-21 . . 90 

Jacquard Design D-23 .... 45 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 120 

Third Year. 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-42 30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . . . .75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 60 

Third Year. 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Jacquard Design D-31 .... 75 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 105 


Textile Design and Cloth Con- 
struction D-30 75 


Physical Education 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla . . 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 
D-10 90 


First Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 240 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 135 


First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Con- 
struction D-30 105 


Textile Testing G-31 .... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 

H-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 90 

Second Term 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 

H-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 60 

Thesis. 


26 


Course IV. — Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

The four-year course in Chemistry and Textile Coloring, leading to the degree 
of B.T.C., is especially intended for those who wish to engage in any branch of 
textile chemistry, textile coloring, bleaching, finishing or the manufacture and 
sale of the dyestuffs or chemicals used in the textile industry. The theory and 
practice of all branches of dyeing, printing, bleaching, scouring and finishing are 
taught by lecture work supplemented by a large amount of experimental laboratory 
work and actual practice in the dyehouse and finishing room. 

The underlying theories and principles of chemistry are the same, no matter 
to what industry the application is eventually made. Furthermore, no industry 
involves more advanced and varied applications of the science of chemistry than 
those of the manufacture and application of the coal-tar coloring matters. In 
addition, the textile colorist must consider the complex composition of the textile 
fibers, and the obscure reactions which take place between them and the other 
materials of the textile industry. 

During the first year general chemistry, including both inorganic and organic, 
is taught by lectures and laboratory work, and this is supplemented during the 
second term by qualitative analysis and stoichiometry. 

Advanced inorganic chemistry, as well as advanced organic chemistry, is studied 
during the second and third year as a continuation of the elementary chemistry 
of the first year, and much time is spent upon quantitative analysis, industrial 
chemistry, and textile chemistry and dyeing. 

The foundation work in general chemistry is continued during the third year 
with courses in physical chemistry, organic laboratory work and analytical work. 
The subject of industrial chemistry is introduced, and much time is devoted to 
advanced textile chemistry, dye testing, color matching, calico printing, and woolen, 
worsted and cotton finishing. 

The fourth year is characterized by an endeavor to present certain subjects of a 
more applied nature in such a manner that the student’s reasoning power and 
ability to apply the knowledge gained during the first three years may be developed 
to the fullest extent. The subject of engineering chemistry is introduced, and the 
work in the dyeing and analytical laboratories is applied as far as possible to the 
actual requirements of the factory chemist and colorist. Much time is also spent in 
the organic chemistry laboratory, particular attention being given to the prepara- 
tion of typical dyestuffs. Thorough courses are given in microscopy, photo- 
micrography and the use of various instruments such as the spectroscope, ultra- 
microscope, polariscope, tintometer and other optical instruments applicable to 
experimental work in connection with the textile industry. Courses are also given 
in report writing and textile literature. 

During this fourth year the student has an opportunity to take several optional 
subjects of an advanced nature and conduct such research work and original 
investigation as time may permit. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


27 


Course IV. — Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Advanced German E-21 ... 45 

Adv. Organic Chemistry C-22 . 30 

English E-20 30 

Mathematics B-20a .... 60 

Physics B-23 65 

Power Weaving D-23 . . . . 15 

Second Year. 
Advanced German E-21 ... 45 

Adv. Organic Chemistry C-22 . 30 

English E-20 30 

Physics B-23 65 

Quantitative Analysis C-23 . .150 

Third Year. 

Adv. Organic Chemistry Lect. 

C-34 15 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-32 135 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-32 30 

Third Year. 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C— 32 75 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-32 15 

Economics E-30 45 

Industrial Chemistry C-31 . . 30 

Organic Laboratory C-36 ... 90 

Fourth Year. 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-44 90 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-44 30 

Chemical Textile Testing C-43 . 45 

Industrial Chemistry C-42 . . 30 

Microscopy and Photomicroscopy 
C-45 60 

Fourth Year. 
Advanced General Chemistry C-49 30 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-44 90 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-44 15 

Chemical Textile Testing C-43 . 45 

Engineering Chemistry C-50 . . 45 


Quantitative Analysis C-23 . . 130 

Stoichiometry C-24 ..... 15 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lab. C-21 90 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 45 

Second Term 

Stoichiometry C-24 15 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lab. C-21 145 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 45 

First Term 

Economics E-30 45 

Physical Chemistry C-33 ... 45 

Quantitative Analysis C-30 . .150 

Technical German C-35 ... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Physical Chemistry C-33 ... 45 

Photography C-37 15 

Quantitative Analysis C-30 . . 105 

Technical German C-35 ... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

First Term 

Options or Thesis C-52 ... 90 

Organic Laboratory C-41 ... 90 

Quantitative Analysis C-46 . . 15 

Report Writing C-47 .... 15 

Technical German C-40 ... 30 

Textile Marketing B-42 ... 30 


Second Term 

Options or Thesis C-52 ... 90 

Organic Laboratory C-41 . . . 105 

Rayon Manufacturing C-51 . . 30 

Technical German C-40 ... 30 

Technology of Wool Manufacture 

G-40 15 

Textile Literature C-48 . . .15 


28 


T 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering 

This course is the four-year general textile course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Textile Engineering (B.T.E.), and aims especially to fit men, in the broadest 
possible manner, to meet the increasing demands of every branch of the textile 
industry for men with combined textile and technical preparation. The magni- 
tude and scope of the textile and allied industries fully justify the most thorough 
technical training possible for all who aspire to leadership in this field. 

The student is first thoroughly grounded in those fundamental principles of 
science upon which all industrial and engineering work rests. The foundation of 
his textile and technical training is in the subjects of mathematics, physics, chem- 
istry, drawing, mechanics, mechanism, and technology of fibers, and their practical 
application. 

Instruction is given in all the various branches of textile manufacturing 
through lectures, recitations and laboratory work. A large proportion of his time 
is spent in well-equipped textile departments where he studies and operates all 
of the machinery required in the conversion of cotton and wool fiber into yarns 
and fabrics. This includes cotton, wool and worsted yarn manufacturing, design- 
ing, weaving, knitting, dyeing and finishing. In his last year the course in textile 
testing acquaints the student with the methods for determining the physical 
properties of textile fibers, yarns and fabrics. 

To properly equip the student to meet the varied engineering problems which 
confront the mill manager or executive, or to so train him that he may enter those 
industries closely allied to the textile, instruction is given by lecture and laboratory 
practice in the several branches of engineering. 

Steam engineering considers the problems involved in steam generation and 
distribution for power, heating and manufacturing purposes, and includes the testing 
of laboratory and power plant equipment. The course in electrical engineering 
treats of the generation and transmission of electrical power, the testing of direct 
and alternating current machinery, and is intended to acquaint the student with 
modern practice. 

Mill engineering familiarizes the student with mill design, construction, heating, 
lighting, humidification and fire protection. The arrangement of machinery and 
buildings for most efficient production and economical power distribution is also 
studied in detail. 

The broadening effect of such subjects as English and economics is carried still 
further in this course by carefully planned courses in business administration, ac- 
counting, cost accounting and business law. 

During the fourth year the student is required to conduct an original investiga- 
tion of some textile or allied problem, and to submit the results in the form of a 
satisfactory thesis before receiving his degree. 

For the student who may desire the breadth of technical training which this 
course offers, but who wishes to specialize in either cotton or wool manufacturing, 
two options are offered. In these optional courses the student's entire textile time 
is devoted to the study of that particular fiber which he elects. Provision is also 
made for the substitution of knitting for weaving laboratory time in the case of 
those who prefer to lay more emphasis on knit fabrics. 

During the past few years a demand has come from the distributing or marketing 
branches of the textile business for men with a four years' technical training. With 
the idea of offering courses which may better prepare graduates to meet this new 
call, the new Sales Option Course is offered. 

There are also requests for a four-year Design Course which, while majoring in 
Textile Design, includes other subjects that help to make a broader course than 
the one of three years' duration. For this purpose the Design Option Course is 
offered. Like the other courses outlined, these will be subject to changes to meet 
new demands. 

For detailed description of subjects, see page 34. The curricula of the several 
optional courses will be found on pages 29 to 33. 




29 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (General Course-G) 
[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 

75 

Physics B-23 . . . 


75 

Fiber Preparation O20 ; 21 

120 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Machine Drawing B-21 

45 

Lecture 020 . 


30 

Machine Shop B-26 .... 

75 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Mathematics B-20 

60 

tion D-22 .... 

. . . 

45 

Second Year. 

Second Term 



Applied Mechanics B-25 

45 

Physics B-23 

. . . 

75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 

75 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. . . 

75 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 

90 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Machine Drawing B-21 

75 

Lect. 020 . . . 


30 

Mathematics B-20 

60 




Third Year. 

First Term 



Applied Mechanics B-30 . 

45 

Power Weaving D-32 . 

. • . 

60 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture 030 

90 

Economics E-30 

45 

Woolen and Worsted 

Finishing 


Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 

75 

H-30 


75 

Heat Engineering B-32 

75 




Third Year. 

Second Term 



Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Mill Engineering B-34 . 

• • • 

90 

Economics E-30 

45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture 030 . 

90 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 

75 

Woolen and Worsted 

Finishing 


Heat Engineering B-33 . . . 

90 

H-30 


75 

Fourth 

Year. 

. First Term 



Accounting B-40 

90 

MillJEngineering B-45 . 


75 

Cotton Organization F-32 . 

90 

Textile Marketing B-42 


30 

Electrical Engineering B-44 

75 

Textile Testing B-43 


45 

Microscopy B-41 

45 

Thesis 


75 

Fourth Year. 

Second Term 



Business Administration B-46] . 

90 

Knitting F-31a . . . 


30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 

105 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 


75 

Electives B-48 


Mill Illumination B-47 . 

... 

45 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 

75 

Thesis 


105 


30 



Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Cotton Option-C) 

[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a 

. 225 

Physics B-23 


75 

Machine Drawing B-21 

. 90 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Machine Shop B-26 

. 45 

Lecture C-20 . . . 


30 

Mathematics B-20 .... 

. 60 




Second 

Year. 

Second Term 



Applied Mechanics B-25 . 

. 45 

Physics B-23 . . . 


75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a 

. 165 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. . . 

105 

Machine Drawing B-21 . . 

. 45 

Textile Chemistry and 

Dyeing 


Mathematics B-20 .... 

. 60 

Lect. C— 20 


30 

Third 

Year. 

First Term 



Applied Mechanics B-30 . 

. 45 

Heat Engineering B-32 


75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a 

. 150 

Power Weaving D-32 . 

• • • 

45 

Economics E-30 

. 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Electrical Engineering B-31 

. 75 

tion D-20 .... 

. . . 

90 

Third Year. 

Second Term 



Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a 

. 150 

Mill Engineering B-34 . 

. . . 

90 

Economics E-30 

. 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Electrical Engineering B-31 

. 75 

tion D-20 .... 


75 

Heat Engineering B-33 . . 

. 90 




Fourth Year. 

, First Term 



Accounting B-40 .... 

. 90 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Cotton Organization F-32 . 

. 105 

tion D-30 .... 


30 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . 

. 75 

Textile Marketing B-42 


30 

Microscopy B-41 .... 

. 45 

Textile Testing B-43 


45 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

. 30 

Thesis 


75 

Fourth Year. 

Second Term 



Business Administration B-46 . 

. 90 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

... 

30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . . 

. 105 

Mill Illumination B-47 . 

• 

45 

Electrical Engineering B-44 

. 75 

Thesis 

• 

75 

Knitting F-31a .... 

. 105 







31 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Wool Option-W) 
[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. 
Fiber Preparation 020, 21 
Machine Drawing B-21 
Machine Shop B-26 . . 

Mathematics B-20 . . . 


First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


225 

90 

45 

60 


Physics B-23 
Textile Chemistry 
Lecture 020 . 


and Dyeing 


75 

30 


Second Year. 
Applied Mechanics B-25 ... 45 

Fiber Preparation 020, 21 . .195 

Machine Drawing B-21 ... 45 

Mathematics B-20 60 


Second Term 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 75 
Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. 020 30 


Third Year. 

Applied Mechanics B-30 ... 45 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Heat Engineering B-32 ... 75 

Third Year. 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Heat Engineering B-33 ... 90 

Mill Engineering B-34 .... 90 

Fourth Year. 

Accounting B-40 90 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 75 

Microscopy B-41 45 

Mill Engineering B-45 .... 30 


Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 75 

Knitting F-31a 105 

Mill Engineering B-45 .... 30 


First Term 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 60 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture 030 150 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture 030 . 150 
Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 75 

Textile Marketing B-42 ... 30 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 45 

Thesis 135 


Second Term 

Mill Illumination B-47 .... 45 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 60 

Thesis 120 


32 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Design Option-D) 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21. . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 

Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 120 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 135 

Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 135 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 60 

Fourth Year. 

Accounting B-40 90 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-42 30 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 90 
Microscopy B-41 45 

Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . .90 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-42 30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 105 


Textile Chemistry a,nd Dyeing 
Lecture C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 210 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 105 

First Term 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Second Term 

Textile Physics B-37 .... 60 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-41 90 

Textile Marketing B-42 ... 30 

Textile Styling B-50 .... 30 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 45 

Thesis 75 

Second Term 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 120 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-41 90 

Thesis 90 


33 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Sales Option-S) 
[For first year 6ee page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lecture C-20 . . . . . . 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 


30 

210 


Second Year. 


Cotton Yam Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 


Second Term 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 105 


Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 75 

Principles of Marketing B-35 . . 45 


First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 135 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 


Economics E-30 45 

Marketing Methods B-36 ... 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 30 

Statistics 45 


Fourth Year. 

Accounting B-40 90 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-42 30 

Microscopy B-41 45 

Principles of Selling and Advertis- 
ing B-49 105 

Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 
D-42 30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 105 


Second Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 60 

Textile Physics B-37 .... 60 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

First Term 

Selling Policies B-52 .... 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-41 60 

Textile Styling B-50 .... 30 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 45 

Thesis 75 

Second Term 

Foreign Trade and Economic Geog- 
raphy B-51 45 

Knitting F-31a 75 

Selling Policies B-52 .... 45 

Thesis 135 


34 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT— B 

The various options are designated by G, C, W, D, S. 

Mathematics — B-10. Preparation: Admission Requirements. The work 
in the first term consists of algebra, plane trigonometry, and instruction in the use 
of the slide-rule. Algebra is reviewed through quadratics and then logarithms are 
taken. In plane trigonometry, right and oblique triangles are solved by means of 
natural and logarithmic functions, and the various algebraic relations among the 
trigonometric functions are proved and used in identities and equations. Significant 
figures and the use of approximate data in calculations are also discussed. 

In the second term the following topics are taken up: graphical and mathematical 
solution of quadratic and simultaneous equations, theory of equations, partial 
fractions, Naperian logarithms, equations of the straight line, equations of various 
curves, differentiation of algebraic functions, and applications of the derivative. 
[All courses.] 

Physics — B-ll. Preparation: Admission Requirements. Taken simul- 
taneously with B-10. This subject is required as a necessary preparation for 
all courses, and is given during the first term of the first year. The fundamental 
principles of this subject are considered absolutely essential to a thorough under- 
standing of the operation of all machinery, textile or otherwise. Some of the topics 
treated in this course are linear and angular velocity, uniform and accelerated 
motion, mass, momentum, inertia, effect of force in producing motion, centrifugal 
force, work, power, energy, principle of moments and its applications, parallelo- 
gram and triangle of forces with applications, resolution and composition of forces, 
the mechanical principles represented by the wheel and axle, differential pulley 
block, common pulley blocks, jackscrew, worm and wheel, inclined plane, hydro- 
statics, elements of hydraulics, kinetic energy, circular motion and harmonic 
motion. 

Laboratory. This course is supplementary to the lecture course and gives the 
student an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in the lecture course by 
performing various experiments. [All courses.] 

Mechanism — B-12. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject is also 
deemed to be one of those absolutely essential to every student’s preparation for 
the work of the following years. Whereas the principles studied are of general 
application, textile machinery in particular furnishes an unusually large variety 
of specific examples, and frequent reference is made to these in the development 
of the course. Some of the important topics covered are gearing and gear train 
design, belting and pulley calculations, cone and stepped pulley design, cam design, 
linkages, epicyclic gear trains, and intermittent motion devices. [All courses.] 

Mechanical Drawing — B-13. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
Taken simultaneously with B-ll. This course is taken during the first year 
and consists of work in the drawing room supplemented by lectures. This sub- 
ject is considered of the greatest importance as a preparation for the student’s 
future work, and the practical usefulness of drawing of this character is fully 
emphasized. 

This course is systematically laid out covering in[order the following divisions : — 
care and use of drawing instruments; lettering; geometrical constructions; ortho- 
graphic projection; isometric projection; cross sections; dimensioning: sketching 
practice on machine details; working drawings; tracing and blueprinting; devel- 
opments with practical application. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Machine Drawing — B-13a. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
Taken simultaneously with B-ll. This course is similar to B-13, but not so 
extensive, and is given to students electing the Chemistry and Textile Coloring 
course. [Course IV.] 

Mathematics — B-20. Preparation: B-10. This subject is a continuation 
of the first year subject B-10, and extends throughout the second year of the engi- 
neering course. In the first term the following topics are treated: — derivatives 
and differentials, the circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, indefinite integrals, 
summation by integration and applications of integration. In the second term the 


35 

topics are: differentiation of transcendental functions, methods of integration, 
centers of gravity, moments of inertia, empirical formulas, and nomographic 
charts. [Course VI.] 

Mathematics— B-20a. Preparation: B-10. This subject is a continuation 
of the work of the first year subject B-10. A study of the derivatives and differen- 
tials is followed by applications of the differential to rates and errors. Other topics 
treated are the circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, indefinite integrals, summation 
by integration, areas, volumes, pressures, exponential, logarithmic, and trigono- 
metric functions. [Course IV.] 

Machine Drawing — B-21. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-14. The work in 
Machine Drawing is devoted to working detail drawings of textile machinery and 
advanced graphical mechanism problems. In every case the data for all of these 
problems are taken directly from some of the textile machines that the students use 
in other departments. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Physics — B-23. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject lays the founda- 
tion for later work in engineering and chemistry and also explains the general 
application of the laws and principles of physics. Instruction, consisting of lectures, 
demonstrations, and recitations, is given for three hours per week during the second 
year. The topics taken up the first term are : — thermometry, measurement of heat, 
change of state, expansion, transfer of heat, humidity, the vernier, wave motion 
and sound. 

The second term is devoted to the study of light, magnetism, and electricity. 
Some of the topics are: — nature and propagation of light, reflection and refraction 
lenses, the telescope and microscope, the spectroscope, color sensation, double 
refraction, magnetism, electrostatics, fundamental laws of direct currents and 
electrolysis. 

Laboratory. A two-hour period per week for Course VI and a three-hour 
period every alternate week for Course IV accompanies the class work in this 
subject and is planned to illustrate precise methods for measuring various physi- 
cal quantities. [Courses IV, VI.] 

Physics — B-23a. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject consists of 
the same topics as B-23 but does not contain anv laboratory work. [Courses I, 
II, III.] 

Steam Engineering — B-24. Preparation: B-12. This course consists of 
thirty lectures given in the first term of the second year. Its aim is to give those 
students who do not take the Textile Engineering Course a general knowledge of 
thermodynamics, the steam engine, steam turbine and gas engine and their auxili- 
aries, and waste heat reclamation. [Courses I, II, III.] 

Applied Mechanics — B-25. Preparation: B-ll, B-20. This course is 
divided into two parts: Graphic Statics and Strength of Materials. The first eight 
weeks of the semester which is devoted to Graphic Statics consists of the study of 
mathematical and graphical solutions for any system of forces. Centers of gravity 
and funicular polygons are introduced followed by roof and bridge truss problems 
under various conditions of dead, live, wind, and snow loading. 

During the second half of the semester and during all the following semester, 
this course deals with Strength of Materials. So far as time permits, such topics 
as stress, strain, methods of testing materials, bending moments, shearing force, 
beam design, torsion, design of shafts, compound beams and columns, combined 
stresses, and like subjects are considered. 

This subject is preparatory to the work in Mill Engineering of both the third 
and fourth years, at which time its practical value and application are clearly 
demonstrated. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Machine Shop Practice — B-26. Preparation: B-ll and B-12. Systematic 
instruction is given in the most approved methods of machine shop practice, the 
object being to familiarize the student with the proper use of hand and machine 
tools, and the characteristics of the different materials worked. Particular atten- 
tion is given to the form, setting, grinding and tempering of tools and the mecha- 
nism of the different machines involving certain speeds, feeds, etc. The course is so 
planned that the instruction in each typical operation shall conform as nearly as 
possible to commercial machine-shop practice on textile machinery. The list of 


36 

tools which appears under “Equipment” in this Bulletin gives an idea of the scope 
of the work, which includes chipping and filing, tool grinding and tempering, straight 
and taper turning, screw cutting, drilling and boring, planer work, milling machine 
work, including gear cutting. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Applied Mechanics — B-30. Preparation: B-25. This is a continuation 
of Applied Mechanics B-25, and is given during the first term of the third year. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electrical Engineering — B-31. Preparation: B-23. The elementary prin- 
ciples of electricity and magnetism are considered in the lecture course on physics. 
Their development and application are taken up in this course in a detailed study 
of the magnetic and electric circuits during the first period of the first term. The 
second period is devoted to a study of the principles of direct current machinery. 
The laboratory work consists of a study of technical electrical measurements 
and dynamo-electric machinery, determining for the latter their operating charac- 
teristics. 

The second term is devoted entirely to a study of the principles of alternating 
current circuits, including vector representation, effective values, power, series 
and parallel circuits. The laboratory work consists of a study of technical electrical 
measurements, some meter calibration including that of watt-hour meters and a 
study of alternating current circuits using electrical measuring instruments. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electricity — B-31a. Preparation: B-23a. This is a short course given in 
the third year of the manufacturing courses, and consists of thirty lectures covering 
briefly and in a general way the theory of direct and alternating current generators 
and motors. [Courses I, II.] 

Heat Engineering — B-32. Preparation: B-12, B-20. The purpose of this 
course is to familiarize the student with the principles of elementary thermodyna- 
mics, the properties of steam, mechanical mixtures and combustion of fuels. The 
course consists of thirty exercises given in the first term of the third year. The 
lectures and recitations are supplemented with illustrative problems assigned for 
home preparation. 

Laboratory. The principles underlying the subjects of steam engineering, 
hydraulics and thermodynamics are demonstrated in a practical manner in the 
work in the Engineering Laboratory, given three hours per week. Greater im- 
portance is attached to the development of initiative and responsibility in the 
student than the mere accomplishment of a large number of carefully planned 
tests. The character of this work is indicated by the following list of experi- 
ments and tests: — 

Calibration of scales, tanks, gauges, inductors and counters; barrel, separating 
and throttling calorimeter tests; heat exchange tests; boiler inspection and meas- 
urement; flue gas analysis; dynamometer tests; ejector and injector tests; Ran- 
kin's efficiency, actual thermal efficiency and duty tests; expansion of pipes, 
radiation and pipe covering tests ; boiler test ; trap tests, feed water heating tests ; 
steam, triplex and centrifugal pump tests. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Heat Engineering — B-33. Preparation: B-32. This course is a continua- 
tion of B-32, and consists of forty-five hours of lectures and recitations given in the 
second term of the third year of the Textile Engineering course. The subjects 
developed are the kinematics of reciprocating steam engines, steam turbines and 
gas engines. Special attention is given to the mechanical principles on which the 
steam engine operates, with detail discussion of the valve gear and governing 
devices, and the various diagrams used for studying the same. Consideration is 
given to the underlying heat theory and to the details of construction of the various 
parts of the machines. During the latter part of the course the historical develop- 
ment, classification and types of turbines and gas engines are discussed. 

Laboratory. The character of the work in the Engineering^ Laboratory, given 
three hours per week during the second half of the third year, is indicated by the 
following list of experiments: — 

Boiler inspection and measurement; Rankin's efficiency, actual thermal effi- 
ciency and duty tests; boiler test; valve setting by measurement and by indi- 
cator; condenser tests; non-condensing and condensing engine and turbine tests; 


37 

heating and ventilating fan tests; lap and butt riveted joint test; nozzle test; gas 
engine test; flow of air and air compressor tests. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-34. Preparation: B-21, B-25. Mill Engineering, 
as presented in thirty lectures during the third year of the Textile Engineering 
course, consists of a discussion of the following topics: the investigation of the 
subsoils for the footing course of the foundation; building materials; design of 
walls, beams, floors, and construction of windows, doors, stairways and roofs. 

Sixty hours of drawing-room and laboratory practice are devoted to plane sur- 
veying, contour plotting, cut and fill calculations, setting of batter boards, align- 
ments of shafting and the study from blue-prints of slow-burning construction. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-34a. Preparation: B-21. Mill Engineering, as 
presented in thirty lectures during the third year of the diploma courses, is largely 
general in its nature and includes only parts of Course B-34. [Courses I, II.] 

Principles of Marketing — B-35. An introduction to the basic principles 
underlying the modern systems of distributing goods with special emphasis on 
the raw and finished products of the textile industry. The course will cover the 
history and economic importance and functions in modern distribution of the 
selling agent, the commission man, the broker, jobber, merchant, factor and other 
intermediaries as well as the channels that goods may take from the producer to 
the ultimate consumer. The importance and advantages of each will be studied 
with special emphasis on the present practice and trends in the textile industry. 

Lectures and the case method of instruction will be employed. [Course VI, Sales 
Option.] 

Marketing Methods — B-36. Preparation: B-35. A continuation of the 
Principles of Marketing. The course will be conducted by means of lectures and 
case problems and discussions. Some of the subjects studied in detail are, — the 
planning of marketing campaigns, the fluctuations of price and style, forecasting, 
the business cycle, quotas, market surveys and research, sales planning and con- 
trol, industrial marketing, and consumer merchandising. 

Considerable time will be devoted to the study of current literature and events 
in the textile field. [Course VI, Sales Option.] 

Textile Physics — B-37. Preparation: B-23. The work in this subject con- 
sists of experimental determinations of the physical properties of textile fibers, 
yarns and fabrics. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of properties which 
determine the color characteristics of textile materials. [Course VI, Design and 
Sales Options.] 

Accounting — B-40. Preparation: B-10 and E-30. The purpose of this 
course is to acquaint the student with the principles and modern methods of 
accounting for mercantile and manufacturing businesses. It is not intended to 
make him a proficient bookkeeper or accountant, but the nature of the subject 
necessitates a basic knowledge of double-entry bookkeeping, the functions of 
ledger accounts, and of the use of checks, drafts, notes, vouchers, etc., in ordinary 
business transactions. This is developed during the summer preceding the senior 
year by requiring the student to take a course in double-entry bookkeeping, thus 
saving valuable time during the school year and effectively preparing the ground 
for the instruction work. 

The first half of the course is based on a study of the proper form and content 
of the balance sheet and profit and loss statement, the principles and problems 
involved in the correct valuation of asset and liability items, and the related topics 
of depreciation, reserves, capital, surplus and dividends. 

The second half of the course is devoted to cost accounting and is planned to 
give the student a knowledge of the best cost methods in use at the present time. 
It includes a thorough discussion of methods of handling and accounting for raw 
materials, direct labor, the distribution of overhead expenses, normal costs and 
1 their predetermination, budgeting, and cost reports and their use. [Course VI.] 

Microscopy — B-41. Preparation: B-23. This subject consists of the study 
of animal and vegetable fibers by means of the microscope and its accessories. It 
includes sectioning and mounting, measurements of diameter and twist, and the 
use of polarized light in the study and identification of fibers. [Course VI.] 


38 

Textile Marketing — B-42. Preparation: E-30. This subject covers the 
problems of marketing textile products, with particular emphasis upon the ulti- 
mate consumer. The course will survey the principal marketing channels and 
marketing methods. Attention is directed to the possibilities of demand creation 
and demand control, especially through market and style research. Current 
changes in marketing organization of the industry will be studied and reviewed. 
[Courses IV and VI, Options G, C, W, D.] 

Textile Testing — B-43. Preparation: B-23, F-30 or G-30, D-32. This 
course is planned to familiarize the student with the latest methods and devices for 
determining the physical properties and characteristics of textile fibers, yarns and 
fabrics. The scope of the work is indicated by the following topics: abrasion, 
absorptability, atmospheric control, bursting, crimp, heat transmission, porosity, 
regain, resilience, stretch, tear, tensile strength, thickness, twist, waterproofness, 
precision of measurements, interpretation and presentation of data. These are 
treated both from the standpoint of commercial testing and of textile research. 
[Course VI.] 

Electrical Engineering — B-44. Preparation: B-31. During the first 
term a detailed study of the alternator is made, with particular stress on generation 
of three-phase currents. Methods of predetermination of alternator regulation 
are taken up and at least one method compared with laboratory test. Parallel 
operation of alternators with accompanying instruments and devices are studied in 
classroom and laboratory. The single phase, three-phase and Scott transformers 
are considered in turn and their various methods of connecting to line and alter- 
nators are systematically studied. 

In the second term the induction motor and generator are studied with their 
particular adaptability to the textile industry. The principal starting devices for 
this motor are thoroughly taken up. The synchronous motor is studied particularly 
in relation to its ability to correct power factor. In all the work outlined above, 
the main features are illustrated profusely in classroom demonstrations and labor- 
atory exercises. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-45. Preparation: B-34. This subject, given in the 
fourth year of the Textile Engineering course, includes many new topics, and at 
the same time coordinates much of the student’s previous work in engineering 
with his knowledge of textile processes and their requirements. In detail it takes 
up a study of modern types of mill buildings and problems involved in their con- 
struction. Such matters as factory location, machinery layout, power transmission, 
heating, ventilation, humidification, fire protection and sanitary facilities are a A so 
discussed. The student is finally assigned the problem of completely designing a 
textile mill building and laying out its machinery and equipment so far as time 
permits. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.J 

Business Administration — B-46. Preparation: B-10 and E-30. Recog- 
nizing the importance which executive work plays in the management of an in- 
dustrial enterprise, this course has been placed in the curriculum of the Textile 
Engineering course in order to acquaint the student with some of the fundamental 
problems and principles involved, and possibly to reveal to him some of his own 
capabilities for this type of work. The broad topics considered are types of busi- 
ness organizations, financing, administration, planning, control, personnel, and 
human relationships. The importance of applied psychology to successful manage- 
ment is stressed. The student is made familiar with some of the tools of manage- 
ment such as purchasing systems, storeskeeping, perpetual inventories, warehous- 
ing methods, scheduling, routing, tracing, time keeping, motion studies, time 
studies, mnemonic symbolizing, graphical records, and wage systems. 

Business Law. Under this subject are given lectures, supplemented by the 
use of a suitable text, on the law governing contracts, sales, agency, partner- 
ships, corporations, negotiable instruments, bailments and carriers, insurance, 
personal property, real property, suretyship and guaranty, and bankruptcy. 
[Course VI.] 

Mill Illumination — B-47. Preparation: B-23. Because of the demand and 
the necessity for proper lighting of textile mills, this course is offered three hours 
per week for one term. It consists of three major parts, — photometry, illumina- 


39 

tion and installation design. Costs and estimates, safety and production are 
included. 

The laboratory exercises include the study and applications of the photometer, 
Macbeth Illuminometer and foot-candle meter. The concluding work is a design 
of a lighting installation for a typical mill room, using the school laboratories for 
this purpose. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electives — B-48. Students in the second term of the fourth year of the Textile 
Engineering course will be permitted to elect certain textile subjects as substitutes 
for part of the time scheduled for engineering subjects. Thus a student is offered 
an opportunity for specialized study along such lines as will prove most beneficial 
to him at that time. The selection of elective studies is subject to the approval 
of the head of the Textile Engineering department and to the possibility of arrang- 
ing for the same. [Course VI, Option G.] 

Principles of Selling and Advertising — B-49. Preparation: B-36. A 
comprehensive course dealing with the fundamental principles of advertising and 
selling. The course will cover the psychology of selling and advertising, the legal 
restrictions in marketing, advertising technique, copy writing, layout, illustrations, 
advertising campaigns, packaging, advertising mediums, industrial and consumer 
advertising, creative salesmanship, personality, types of customers, the selling 
process, supersalesmanship, etc. 

Lectures and the case method of instruction will be used. [Course VI, Sales 
Option.] 

Textile Styling — B-50. Preparation: B-37, D-30. This course will cor- 
relate the technical knowledge of design, acquired previously, to the fluctuations 
of style design, the creation of fads and the forecasting and planning of styles. 
[Course VI, Options D, S.] 

Foreign Trade and Economic Geography — B-51. Preparation: E-30. 

The course will cover the foreign markets for finished textiles and the American 
raw fibers, methods of selling employed, foreign commercial law that an American 
exporter needs, the foreign fibers and textiles and their importance in international 
trade. 

Special emphasis will be given upon costs of foreign marketing, tariffs, inter- 
national competition, possible markets and methods of building an export business. 
[Course VI, Sales Option.] 

Selling Policies — B-52. Preparation: B-49. This course will cover the 
development of administrative policies and guiding principles in the marketing, 
pricing, styling and merchandising of textiles and textile fibers. [Course VI, 
Sales Option.] 

Statistics — B-53. Preparation: B-20. A study of elementary statistics 
which relate to industry, trade and general business and financial conditions. It 
includes the analysis, presentation and interpretation of statistical data, index 
numbers, correlation, law of error, cyclical fluctuations, dispersion, trend and other 
pertinent topics. [Course VI, Sales Option.] 

CHEMISTRY AND DYEING DEPARTMENT— C 

Elementary Chemistry (Inorganic and Organic Chemistry) — C-10. 
Preparation: Admission Requirements. Instruction in Inorganic Chemistry 
extends through the first year, and includes lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work. The subject of Organic Chemistry is covered by lectures during the second 
term. 

Elementary Tnorganic^Chemis try 

During the first term of the first year, the class work in this course consists of 
three lectures, and one recitation per week on fundamental principles, and de- 
scriptive chemistry of the non-metallic elements and their compounds. This is 
accompanied by one afternoon per week of laboratory work, which may be on 
either inorganic preparations or qualitative analysis, according to the previous 
laboratory training of the individual student. 

In the second term, one lecture and one recitation per week are devoted to 
the metals and their compounds, and one afternoon per week wholly to quali- 
tative analysis, listed below as C-ll. 


40 

Elementary Organic Chemistry 

This course includes a general survey of the fundamental principles of Organic 
Chemistry, also a study of the hydrocarbons and their derivatives from the point 
of view of their structure, preparation and uses. This work, although elementary 
in character, is of sufficient breadth to prepare the student understanding^ for 
the general lectures upon coal-tar dyestuffs which are given in Course C-20. 
[All courses.] 

Qualitative Analysis — C-ll. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously* 

This is a continuation of the laboratory study of inorganic compounds, with 
application to their systematic analysis. It is given ten hours per week to chemists 
during the second term of the first year. Students with adequate preparation 
can make further progress by starting this work in place of elementary laboratory 
exercises during the first term, as indicated under C-10. 

When sufficiently advanced, students take up the examination of various products 
with which the textile chemist must be familiar such as testing mordanted cloths, 
pigments and the various dyeing reagents. [Course IV.] 

Qualitative Analysis — C-lla. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. 

This course is similar to C-ll, but not so extensive, being given three hours per 
week during the second term. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Stoichiometry — C-12. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. Two 

hours per week during the second term of the first year, on the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying calculations of quantitative analysis, on the gas laws, and on 
balancing of chemical equations. [Course IV.] 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-20. Preparation: C-10, B-12, B-14. 

The outline of the lecture course which is given during the second year is as 
follows: — 

Technology of Vegetable Fibers. — Cotton, linen, jute, hemp, china grass. 
Chemical and physical properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, 
and their action with chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Animal Fibers. — Wool, mohair, silk. Chemical and physical 
properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, and their action with 
chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Artificial Fibers. — Study of the various forms of artificial 
silk, the process of manufacture, their properties and action with chemicals, acids 
and heat. 

Operations Preliminary to Dyeing. — Bleaching of cotton and linen; wool- 
scouring; bleaching, fulling and felting of wool; carbonizing; silk-scouring and 
bleaching; action of soap. 

The bleaching of cotton cloth, yam and raw stock is studied at length with 
detailed description of the various forms of kiers and machinery used; also the 
action of the chemicals used upon the material, and the various precautions that 
must be taken in order to insure successful work. 

Under this heading is also included an exhaustive study of the reagents used in 
the emulsive wool-scouring process, and their action upon the fiber under various 
conditions; also the most successful of the solvent methods for degreasing wool. 

Water and its Application in the Textile Industry. — Impurities present, 
methods for detection, their effect during the different operations of bleaching, 
scouring, dyeing and printing and the methods used for their removal or correction 

The important subject of boiler waters is also studied under this heading, with 
a full discussion of the formation of boiler scale, its disastrous results, and the 
methods by which it may be prevented. 

Mordants and Other Chemical Compounds Used in Textile Coloring 
and Classified as Dyestuffs. — Theory of mordants, their chemical properties 
and application, aluminum mordants, iron mordants, tin mordants, chromium 
mordants, organic mordants, tannin materials, soluble oil, fixing agents, leveling 
agents, assistants, and numerous other compounds, not dyestuffs, that are ex- 
tensively used in the textile industry. 

Under this heading are included the definitions of various terms and classes 
of compounds used by textile colorists, such as color lakes, pigments, fixing 


41 

agents, developing agents, mordanting assistants, mordanting principles and 
leveling agents. 

Theory of Dyeing. — A discussion of the chemical, mechanical, solution and 
absorption theories, and the various views that have been advanced by different 
investigators of the chemistry and physics of textile coloring processes. 

Under this heading are discussed the general methods of classifying dyestuffs 
and the definitions of such terms as textile coloring, dyeing, textile printing, sub- 
stantive and adjective dyestuffs, monogenetic and polygenetic dyestuffs. 

Natural Organic Coloring Matters. — Properties and application of indigo, 
logwood, catechu or cutch, Brazil wood, cochineal, fustic, turmeric, madder, 
quercitron bark, Persian berries, and other natural dyestuffs that have been used 
within recent years by textile colorists. 

Mineral Coloring Matters. — Under this heading are discussed the proper- 
ties of such inorganic coloring matters and pigments as chrome yellow, orange 
and green, Prussian blue, manganese brown and iron buff. 

Artificial Coloring Matters. — General discussion of their history, nature, 
source, methods of manufacture, methods of classification and their application 
to all fibers. 

Special study of basic coloring matters, phthalic anhydride colors, including the 
eosins and phloxines; acid dyestuffs, Janus, direct cotton, sulphur and mordant 
colors, including the alizarines and other artificial coloring matter requiring me- 
tallic mordants; mordant acid and insoluble azo colors, developed on the fiber; 
reduction vat colors, aniline black and other artificial dyestuffs not coming under 
the above heads. 

As each class of dyestuffs is taken up, the details of the methods of applying 
them upon all the different classes of fabrics and in all the different forms of 
dyeing machines are thoroughly discussed; also the difficulties which may arise 
in their application, and the methods adopted for overcoming them. 

Machinery Used in Dyeing. — A certain amount of time is devoted to the 
description of the machinery used in various processes of textile coloring which 
is supplemented as far as possible by the use of charts, diagrams and lantern 
slides. 

Most of the important types of dyeing machines are installed within the dye- 
house of the school, and the students can be taken directly from the lecture room 
and shown the machines in actual operation. [All courses.] 

Dyeing Laboratory— C-21. Preparation: C-20 taken simultaneously. 
Besides lectures and recitations upon the subject of Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, 
practical laboratory work is required. By the performance of careful and syste- 
matic experiments the student learns the nature of the various classes of dyestuffs 
and their coloring properties, their action under various circumstances, and the 
conditions under which they give the best results. The more representative dye- 
stuffs of each class are applied to cotton, wool, silk and the various types of rayon, 
and each student is obliged to enter, in an especially arranged sample book, a 
specimen of each of his dye trials with full particulars as to the conditions of ex- 
periment, percentage of compounds used, time, temperature of dye bath, etc. 

For convenience and economy most of the dye trials are made upon small skeins 
or swatches of the required materials, but from time to time students are required 
to dye larger quantities in the full-sized dyeing machines which are described 
elsewhere. 

By the use of a small printing machine the principles of calico printing are illus- 
trated, and by means of the full-sized dyeing machines and vats the practical side 
of the subject is studied. It is the constant endeavor of those in charge to impart 
information of a theoretical and scientific character that will be of value in the 
operation of a dyehouse. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Organic Chemistry— C-22. Preparation: C-10. In this course, 
which consists of lectures and recitations, the principles of organic substitution 
and synthesis are thoroughly discussed and as many illustrations are used as time 
will permit, particularly such as are applied in the arts. The aliphatic series of 
hydrocarbons and their derivatives are studied for about twenty weeks, the re- 
mainder of the time being devoted to the benzine series. The aim of the course 
is to lay a broad foundation for the study of the chemistry of the artificial dye- 


42 

stuffs. Students are required to work out problems in the synthesis of various 
compounds, in order to become familiarized with equation writing. [Course IV.] 

Quantitative Analysis— C-23. Preparation: C-ll. The object of this 
course is to teach the fundamental principles of quantitative analysis, and to 
give the student an opportunity of acquiring skill in manipulating the special 
apparatus used in analytical procedure. 

Typical gravimetric methods are taught the first term. The samples analyzed 
comprise salts, minerals and ores. Electrochemical analysis is carried out with 
the aid of a modern type of apparatus designed for rapid work. 

The work of the second term consists of volumetric methods. A number of ores 
and commercial products, carefully chosen, are analyzed so as to give the student 
a varied experience. 

The laboratory work is supplemented by lectures and recitations. Smith’s 
“Quantitative Chemical Analysis” is used as a text. [Course IV.] 

Stoichiometry — C-24. Preparation: B-IO, C-10, C-12. This subject is 
taken one hour a week during the second year. Calculations of gravimetric 
analysis are studied the first term, and calculations of volumetric analysis the 
second term. Hamilton and Simpson’s Calculations of Quantitative Chemical 
Analysis is used as a text. [Course IV.] 

Quantitative Analysis — C-30. Preparation: C-23. The fundamental 
principles acquired in Course C-23 are applied in this course in the examination of 
materials used in the textile mill, the dyehouse, and the finishing plant. Among 
the materials analyzed are water, soaps, oils, textile fabrics, stripping agents, 
acids and alkalies. The latest and most practical methods are employed. Griffin’s 
“Methods of Technical Analysis” is used as a text. [Course IV.] 

Industrial Chemistry (Lecture) — C-31. Preparation: C-22. During the 
second term of the third year lectures and recitations are held in industrial chem- 
istry, the course in general following Riegel’s “Industrial Chemistry.” Particular 
attention is paid to those subjects which are of special interest to the textile chemist, 
as oils, soaps, gas and coal-tar industry, building materials, and the manufacture 
on a large scale of important chemical compounds, such as the common acids 
and alkalies, bleaching powders, various mordants, etc. The course is illustrated 
as far as possible with specimens, diagrams, and charts, and the students are 
given an opportunity to visit some of the industrial establishments in the vicinity 
of Lowell and Boston. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-32. Preparation: C-20, 
C-21. This is a continuation of the Textile Chemistry and Dyeing course of the 
second year, and includes a review of the second year’s work in this subject, with 
the introduction of many advanced considerations, and in addition, the following 
subjects: — 

Color Matching and Color Combining. — A study of that portion of physics 
which deals with color and the many color phenomena of interest to the textile 
colorist. The lecture work is supplemented with the practical application of the 
spectroscope and tintometer, and much practice in the matching of dyed samples 
of textile material. 

The primary colors both of the scientist and textile colorist, the results of com- 
bining coloring lights and pigments, and such subjects as color perception, color 
contrast, purity of color, luminosity, hue, color blindness, dichroism, fluorescence 
and the effect of different kinds upon dyed fabrics, are discussed under this 
heading. 

Each student’s eyes are tested for color blindness early in the course, in order 
that he may be given an opportunity to change his course if his eyes should 
prove defective enough to interfere with his work as a textile colorist. 

A dark room has been provided where various experiments in color work and 
color matching may be performed. 

Dye Testing. — This subject includes the testing of several dyestuffs of each 
class, subjecting them to the common, color-destroying agencies; the determining 
of their characteristic properties, and their action towards the different fibers; 
also the determining of the actual money value and coloring power of dyestuffs 
in terms of a known standard. 


43 

Each student is required to make a record of each color tested upon an espe- 
cially prepared card, which furnishes a permanent record of all dyestuffs, their 
dyeing properties, fastness to light and weather, washing, soaping, fulling, per- 
spiration, bleaching, steaming, ironing, rubbing, acids and alkalies. 

Union Dyeing. — A study of the principles involved in the dyeing of cotton 
and wool, cotton and silk, and silk and wool union materials in the production of 
solid and two-color effects. 

Textile Printing. — A thorough study of the whole subject of textile printing, 
each student being required to produce individually no less than twenty different 
prints, including the following styles; pigment style, direct printing style, steam 
style with tannin mordant, steam style with metallic mordant, madder or dyed 
style, the ingrain or developed azo style, discharge dye style, discharge mor- 
danted style, resist style, indigo printing, aniline black printing. 

The different parts of the calico printing machine are thoroughly studied; also 
the precautions which must be considered in its use, and the arrangement of the 
dyeing apparatus which must accompany such a machine. 

Special attention is paid to the methods of mixing and preparing the various 
color printing pastes that are used in the above work upon a manufacturing scale 
as well as experimentally in the laboratory. 

Cotton Finishing. — A study of the various processes of finishing cotton 
cloth and the different materials used therein. The work involves the discussion 
of the various objects of cotton finishing and such operations as pasting, damp- 
ing, calendering, stretching, stiffening, mercerizing, beetling and filling, and the 
various machines used for carrying out these processes. 

Mill Visits. — During the third and fourth years visits are made to some of 
the large dyehouses, bleacheries and print works in the vicinity. [Course IV.] 

Physical Chemistry— C-33. Preparation: B-10, C-10, C-12. During 
the third year, three hours per week of lectures and recitations are given on the 
application of the experimental methods and calculations of physics to chemical 
phenomena. Students passing this course may supplement it by the optional 
laboratory course C-42 in the fourth year. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Organic Chemistry — C-34. Preparation: C-22. This is a con- 
tinuation of Advanced Organic Chemistry C-22. [Course IV.] 

Technical German — C-35. Preparation: C-20, C-22, E-21. This course 
consists of the reading of German technical literature with the object of familiariz- 
ing the student with the current German publications in textile chemistry and 
coloring. [Course IV.] 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory— C-36. Preparation: C-20, C-22, C-23. 

This course, while including practice in the usual methods of organic analysis, and 
giving excellent training in the principles and manipulations of general organic 
synthesis, is especially devoted to the synthetic dyestuffs. The student not only 
prepares many of the representative dyestuffs, but, what is far more important, 
he carries out all the operations, beginning with coal tar itself. Thus, instead of 
merely coupling two or more of the foreign imported intermediate products to 
make a dyestuff, he starts with the basic substances obtained from the coal tar 
and makes his own intermediate products. As far as is possible the student will 
be made acquainted with the problems which might arise in a dyestuff factory, 
and an excellent opportunity is presented for original work. [Course IV.] 

Photography— C-37. Preparation: B-23, C-20, C-22, C-23. Photography 
is today indispensable to the scientist and textile chemist. Without the aid of 
photography he cannot preserve and keep an absolute and accurate record of his 
investigations and research problems. 

The Institute therefore offers to the senior chemists an eight-weeks' course in the 
elements of Photography. One object of this course is to provide the student with 
the preliminary knowledge and training necessary for the course in Microscopy and 
Photomicrography which follows. 

The course includes a study of the different types of cameras and lenses, the 
making of contact prints from classified negatives using various grades of papers, 
reduction and intensification of negatives, enlarging, copying, negative making 
and lantern slide preparation. 


44 

The theory and chemistry of the above subjects are not only covered in the 
classroom but in addition all of this work is actually carried on by each individual 
student in the Photographic Laboratory and Dark Room. [Course IV.] 

Technical German — C-40. Preparation: C-35. This is a continuation of 
Technical German C-35. [Course IV.] 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory — C-41. Preparation: C-34. This is a 
continuation of Organic Chemistry Laboratory C-34. [Course IV.] 

Industrial Chemistry — C-42. Preparation: C-31. This is a continuation 
of Industrial Chemistry C-31. [Course IV.] 

Chemical Textile Testing — C-43. Preparation: C-21, C-32. A series of 
lecture and laboratory periods covering the theory and use of the instruments and 
apparatus used in testing and evaluating textile materials. Emphasis is given to 
those tests which may be used to give a chemist valuable information as to the 
source and quality of textiles. The last part of the work consists of chemical and 
optical tests which may be necessary to a textile chemist in either routine or re- 
search work. [Course IV.] 

Advanced Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-44. Preparation: C-32. 
This is a continuation of the third-year work in Advanced Textile Chemistry and 
Dyeing, and includes the following subjects: — 

Classification and Molecular Structure of Artificial Dyestuffs. — A 
study from a more advanced standpoint of the classification and constitution of 
artificial dyestuffs including the various methods used in their production, also 
the orientation of the various groups which are characteristic of these compounds 
and their effect on the tinctorial power of dyestuffs. 

The object of this study is to give the student a more complete knowledge of 
the artificial dyestuffs from the color manufacturer’s point of view, which will 
prove of particular value to those who intend later to enter the employ of dye- 
stuff manufacturers or dealers. 

Economics of the Dyeing, Bleaching and Finishing Industries. — A study 
of the factors to be considered in the establishment of a dyeing, bleaching and 
finishing plant together with the most essential considerations of its management. 

Advanced Dyeing Conference. — During the latter part of his course each 
student will be required to write, for presentation before the other members of 
his class, a paper upon some assigned subject of general interest. After presenta- 
tion the subject will be open to discussion and question. 

The object of this conference is twofold. First, to give the student experience 
and practice in systematically looking up an assigned subject and presenting it 
before others; and secondly, to bring before the class a greater variety of sub- 
jects with more detail than could be covered by the general lectures of the 
course. [Course IV.] 

Microscopy and Photomicroscopy — C-45. Preparation: B-23, C-20, 
C-22, C-37. The value of the microscope in the identification of textile materials 
and the examination of textile yarns and fabrics cannot be overestimated. In col- 
junction with photomicroscopy a permanent record which may be filed for future 
reference and which is understandable by non-technical men is obtained. 

In this course the students are given instruction in the use and construction of 
various types of microscopes and accessories; the preparation and mounting of 
samples; the identification of starches and fibers; microchemicai reactions; and 
examination of fabrics for faults. Actual unknown fibers, starches and fabrics are 
examined and reported upon. 

Following microscopy, the student takes up photomicroscopy, for which he has 
been prepared by a thorough course in the common processes of photography. The 
types and constructions of photomicrographic apparatus, adjustments, and ex- 
posures are taught by actual work in the photomicrographic laboratory. The 
student studies the use of such auxiliaries as color filters, polarized light, dark- 
ground illumination, color photography, and works at both high and low magnifica- 
tions. At the end of the course the student is given a typical industrial or research 
problem on which he works independently and upon which he must prepare a 
complete report, illustrated by appropriate photomicrographs. [Course IV.] 


45 

Quantitative Analysis — C-46. Preparation: C-30. This course consists 
of lectures, recitations and quizzes on the fundamental principles of analytical 
chemistry. [Course IV.] 

Report Writing — C-47. Preparation: B-20a, E-20. The purpose of this 
course is to enable the student to write a technical report clearly. An analysis of a 
complete research is first made. This is followed by a bibliography and instructions 
in the use of reference books and technical journals. Methods of obtaining and 
interpreting laboratory data are given and the elements of statistical analysis 
demonstrated and used. Instruction and illustrations of various technical and non- 
technical, formal and informal, laboratory and plant reports are given. [Course IV.] 

Textile Literature — C-48. Preparation: C-47. The object of this course is 
to introduce the student to the current sources of information on textile chemical 
subjects. Each student is assigned a subject and is required to keep informed on 
that subject by first a survey of the literature and then the reading of current 
technical journals. Reports are tendered informally and orally. [Course IV.] 

Advanced General Chemistry — C-49. Preparation: C-10, C-ll, C-24, 
C-34, C-42, C-46. The object of this course is more to correlate the various 
branches of chemistry studied in the previous three and one-half years than to 
introduce new material. An attempt is made to show the essential oneness of all 
chemical knowledge. Recent theories are discussed briefly. [Course IV.] 

Engineering Chemistry — C-50. Preparation: C-22, C-23. This course 
consists of a series of lectures covering the derivation, sampling, analysis, and 
specification of coals, gasolines, kerosenes, fuel gases, flue gases, oils, greases, and 
boiler waters. This is followed by a study of combustion and the underlying 
principles of lubrication. The lectures are supplemented by laboratory work con- 
sisting of complete analyses of coal, gasoline, oil, grease, flue gas, and illuminating 
gas. [Course IV.] 

The Chemistry of Rayon, Its Manufacture, Bleaching, Dyeing and 
Finishing — C-51. Preparation: C-32. During the past five years the develop- 
ments of the bleaching, dyeing and finishing of rayon have been systematically 
studied and the curriculum of the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course has been 
revised from time to time to cover the latest developments in regard to these 
fibers. A complete unit for the actual manufacture of rayon is available for experi- 
mental and demonstration purposes, and the course includes laboratory practice 
in the manufacture of viscose rayon. 

Many of the difficulties which arose during the early days of the artificial silk 
industry were due to lack of knowledge of its properties and more or less persistent 
attempts to handle it in just the same manner as real silk. As soon as the textile 
manufacturer began to fully appreciate the fact that the various rayons were 
entirely different fibers from true silk and consequently must be handled by dif- 
ferent methods, then many extensive improvements were made in the processes 
of manufacturing textiles containing these fibers. In order to satisfactorily handle 
the different rayons they must receive a preliminary treatment with various oils 
and softeners, and as a result the problem of establishing the specifications for the 
best type of oil to use for this purpose and also the best methods of removing it 
from the material during the finishing process have been important problems in 
the development of the industry, and these among others are being studied in the 
Lowell Textile Institute at the present time. [Course IV.] 

Optional Subjects or Thesis during ^fourth^ year — C-52. Preparation: 
Satisfactory completion of alljirst and second year subjects in Course IV. 
The value of undergraduate thesis work for all students has frequently been ques- 
tioned. There is no doubt that many senior students might take optional work of 
an advanced nature to greater advantage than devoting the same amount of time 
to specific thesis work. With this in mind beginning 1931-32 several options were 
introduced, each optional period being 45 hours per term and four of these being 
required during the year. 

If a student has indicated through the first three years of his work that he is 
capable of handling an original investigation, a definite thesis subject may be 
assigned to him which will require the entire 180 hours. At the discretion of the 
Head of the Department, thesis subjects involving one or more option periods 
may also be assigned. 


46 

In all cases, however, 180 hours’ work of an advanced nature, either of thesis 
work or optional subjects, will be required for graduation. 

Options: Textile Chemistry Laboratory. A laboratory course on some 
branch of textile chemistry varying from year to year. 

Photomicroscopy. A series of laboratory experiments followed by a research 
problem in photomicroscopy. Effects of the optical system, exposure, polarized 
light and dark ground illumination are studied and color photomicroscopy is 
included as far as time permits. 

Colloid Chemistry. A seminar course on general colloid chemistry with spe- 
cial applications to textiles. The colloid chemistry of dyeing, the action of 
detergents, and the swelling effects of various materials on the fibers are espe- 
cially emphasized. 

Microbiology I. This course gives a general survey of the effect of the vari- 
ous micro-organisms on textile materials. Consideration is given to the methods 
of studying molds and bacteria and the methods of preventing their growth on 
textiles. In the laboratory the isolation, identification and properties of the 
organisms are studied. The detection of micro-organisms on fibers and damage 
to fibers caused by their growth is studied in detail. Methods of testing anti- 
septics to be used on textiles are also studied. 

Microbiology II. A continuation of Microbiology I, laying special emphasis 
on the branch of microbiology in which the student is most interested. No lec- 
tures are given but each student is required to do certain reading and frequent 
conferences are held with the instructor. In the laboratory each student selects 
some problem and works it out as thoroughly as time permits. 

Rayon. Advanced study of rayon dyeing. 

Physical Chemistry. Measurement of molecular weights, heats of reaction, 
vapor pressure, surface tension, hydrogen ion concentration, electrical conduc- 
tivity, etc. 

Advanced Preparative Chemistry. The student is required to carry through 
certain preparations starting with a weighed minimum and handing in a weighed 
product. The preparations are so chosen as to review the principles of inorganic 
chemistry and at the same time develop the student’s laboratory technique. By 
basing the grade on quantity as well as quality of product obtained, careful 
technique is encouraged. Conferences and quizzes are given before and after 
each preparation. The student is constantly required to apply the principles of 
previous lecture courses in analytical, inorganic and physical chemistry. 

TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING DEPARTMENT— D 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis — D-10. During the first year instruction 
is given in the subject of classification of fabrics, use of point or design paper, plain 
fabrics, intersection, twills and their derivation, sateen, basket and rib weaves, 
checks, and stripes, fancy weaves, including figured and colored effects; producing 
chain and draw from design, and vice versa ; extending and extracting weaves. 

This subject takes up in a systematic manner the analysis of samples illustrating 
the various cloth constructions for the purpose of determining the design, of the 
weave and the amount and kind of yarns used, and forms the basis of calculation 
in the cost of reproducing any style of goods. The various topics discussed are 
reeds and setts; relation and determination of counts of cotton, woolen, worsted, 
silk and yarns made from the great variety of vegetable fibers; grading of yarns, 
folded, ply, novelty and fancy yarns; application of the metric system to yarn cal- 
culation; problems involving take-up, average counts, determination of counts of 
yarn, and weight of yarn required to produce a given fabric. [First term, all 
courses.] [Second term, Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-20. For Cotton Goods — Prep- 
aration: D-10. During the second year consideration is given to fancy and 
reverse twills, diaper work, damasks, skip weaves, sateen fabrics with plain ground, 
backed fabrics, and multiple ply fabrics. Students are required to make original 
designs and put the same into the loom. Special attention is given to the con- 
sideration of color effect. 

During the first term free-hand drawing is taught by means of plates, and prac- 
tice in coloring is given in conjunction with this work. 


47 

Practice in lettering, spacing and general arrangement of designs and sketches 
is given. The engineering alphabet is used in all work. 

During the second term instruction is given in drawing, sketching, coloring and 
designing, with reference to their application in textiles. Good examples of applied 
design in textiles, as well as in other branches, are used as a basis for modified 
designs selected and composed by the student. This stimulates originality as well 
as teaches the student to appreciate good designs and color. 

The analysis of these fabrics forms a part of the course in design. This also 
includes the necessary calculations required to reproduce the fabric or to construct 
fabrics of similar character. [Courses I, III, VI, Options C, D, S.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-21. For Woolen and Worsted 
Goods — Preparation: D-10. During the second year the instruction given 
includes warp and filling backed cloth, figured effects produced by extra warp and 
filling, double cloths, multiple ply fabrics, cotton warps, blankets, bathrobes, 
crepes, filling reversible, Bedford cords, imitation furs, crepons, matelasse and 
imitations, double plain, ingrains, velvets, corduroys, overcoatings, trouserings. 

The analysis of these fabrics, together with the consideration of the shrinkages 
and dead loss in all fabrics, theory of diameter of yarns, and costs of blends and 
mixes is a part of this course. [Courses II, III, VI, W, D, S.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-22. Preparation: D-10. 
This is a short course covering the elementary principles of designing in general. 
Instruction is given in the theory of shrinkages and the lay-out of woolen and 
worsted fabrics, and at the same time similar instruction is given in the design and 
construction of cotton fabrics. [Course VI, General Option.] 

Jacquard Design — D-23. Preparation: D-10. This course, given during 
the second term, covers detail instruction of the Jacquard machine and the various 
tie-ups in common use, the layout for different kinds of fabrics, and the cutting of 
cards in accordance with prepared designs. The adaptation of various designs to 
woven fabrics through the aid of cross section paper and its correlation with the 
different types of looms and Jacquard machines are thoroughly covered. The 
student is encouraged in original designs and such of these as meet approval are 
carried out in woven goods. [Course III.] 

Power Weaving — D-24. Preparation: D-10. In connection with the work 
in Textile Design and Cloth Analysis practical work is carried on upon the power 
looms. This includes the preparation of warps, beaming, dressing, sizing, draw- 
ing-in and making of chains, the cutting and lacing of cards, spoofing and quilling 
and the machinery for the same. A study is made of warpers and sizing machines, 
both for cotton and woolen. Lectures are given to correspond with the progress 
of the student in the Power Weaving Laboratory covering the following subjects: 
loom adjustments, chain building, shuttle changing looms, dobby looms, single and 
double acting dobbies, handkerchief motions, leno weaving, center selvedge motion, 
filling changing looms, oscillating reeds, lappet motions, various shaker motions, 
towel and other pile cloth weaving, Jacquard looms, single and double lift leno 
Jacquards, Jacquards of special design, tying up Jacquard harness. [Courses I, 
II, III, VI.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-30. Preparation: D-20 or 
D-21. The advanced work takes up the more complicated weaves adapted to 
harness work, and leads into leno and Jacquard designs. The following is a brief 
fist of the subject heads, which will give some idea of the course: double plain 
cloths, ingrains, tricots, qhinchilla, tapestry, blankets, upholsteries, spot weaves, 
pile or plush, crepon, matelasse and its imitations, pique, Marseilles, quilting, and 
miscellaneous designs for Jacquard, leno, fustian, tissue fabrics and lappets. 

Original designs and sketches for particular grades of goods and the study of 
color effects form an important part of the third-year course. It should be under- 
stood that work in decorative art is carried on in conjunction with textile con- 
struction and weaving, particularly on the Jacquard loom. Designs of merit are 
carefully developed in detail and woven into cloth. 

The work in cloth construction includes the application of the different weaves 
and their combinations in the productions of fancy designs, both modified and 
original; the calculation involved in the reproduction of standard fabrics changed 


4 


48 

to meet varying conditions of weight, stock, counts of yarn and value; and the 
discussion of the breaking strength of fabrics and relationship of the construction 
of the fabric to breaking strength. 

Instruction in this subject, which is given by classroom work, is intended to 
bring together the principles considered under the subject of design, cloth con- 
struction, weaving and yarn making of previous years, and to show the bearing each 
has in the successful construction of a fabric. [Courses III, VI, Options C, D, S.] 

Jacquard Design — D-31. This is a continuation of Jacquard Design D-23. 
[Course III.] 

Power Weaving — D-32. Preparation: D-20, D-21, or D-23. Instruction 
is given in weaving on fancy woolen and worsted looms, single and double acting 
dobbies, leno weaving, various shaker motions, lappet loom weaving, double and 
single lift Jacquard looms, tying up Jacquard harness, leno Jacquard, harness and 
box chain building; warp preparation for woolen and worsted and cotton; formulas 
for making up different kinds of sizing. Lectures are given to correspond with the 
same. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Jacquard Design and Weaving — D-40. Preparation: D-23. Instruction 
bears particular stress on the sketching of original designs as applied to particular 
fabrics with reference to the more advanced forms of fabrics and warp tie-ups. In 
this work the student not only produces his own sketches but must carry his ideas 
through to the finished fabric. [Course VI, Option D.] 

Textile Design and Cloth Construction — D-41. Preparation D-10, D-20, 
D-21. The work in this course is the application of the instruction received during 
the three years previous. Particular attention is given to the layout of designers* 
blankets. Instruction in the production of new designs is given by the use of design 
suggestion sheets. As in the Jacquard work the student must not only lay out the 
blankets but must put them in the loom and work out the various effects for himself. 
[Course VI, Options D, S.] 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry — D-42. Color. — A study of color wheels, 
values and chromas. Combinations and proportions as well as saturation of color 
to produce a pleasant effect for the design in question. 

Dtoamic Symmetry. — A mechanical approach to creating patterns suitable 
for either weaving or printing. The laws of Dynamic Symmetry cut an area in 
such a way that designs and good composition may be easily developed even by 
those having little artistic ability. [Courses III and VI, Options D, S.] 

Decorative Art for Special Students. This course is planned to give a 
student a working knowledge and appreciation of design. The first and second 
years are devoted to a general study of design, color, perspective, lettering and 
rendering. Drawings are made in the historic styles for all materials, — wood, 
gold, silver, copper, brass, leather, fabrics, wall papers and glass. 

In the third year students should specialize and devote their attention to the 
material in which they expect to work. 

LANGUAGE AND HISTORY DEPARTMENT— E 

English — E-10. Preparation: Admission Requirements. A technically 
trained man should be able to express himself clearly, forcibly and fluently, as 
inability to do so will be a serious handicap to him in after life. The object of 
the English course is to develop the students power of expression by a thorough 
study of the principles of advanced rhetoric and composition, and by constant 
writing of themes illustrative of the four forms of discourse, viz., description, 
narration, exposition and argumentation. In addition to the study of rhetoric 
and composition and the writing of themes, several classics such as are not read 
in the preparatory schools are studied and discussed. [All courses.] 

Elementary German — E-ll. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
This course is intended for first-year students who do not offer German as an en- 
trance requirement and who desire to take the course in Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring. It may be selected by students taking the Textile Engineering course 
who have not fully met the entrance requirements in language. The work is ele- 


49 

mentary in character, and much time is devoted to the study of the rudiments of 
German grammar with practice in composition. During the latter part of the year 
considerable attention is given to the reading of ordinary German prose, which 
serves as an additional preparation to the student for the later reading of works 
along scientific and industrial lines. [Course IV.] 

English — E-20. Preparation: E-10. The curriculum of this course is based 
upon the sound belief that the young man about to enter business can profit much 
by the study of the principles and the rules of standard English as applied to busi- 
ness writing. The student is given a comprehensive remedial review of the funda- 
mentals of grammar in their relation to practical expression in writing letters and 
reports. Class discussions of actual quoted letters, collateral readings, and home 
preparation of written assignments afford the student abundant opportunity to 
enlarge his vocabulary and to improve his style. During the second semester, 
modern essays and other works of fiction are read and discussed. The course meets 
twice each week. [Course IV.] 

Advanced German — E-21. Preparation: E-ll. For students taking the 
course in Chemistry and Textile Coloring the elementary course of the first year 
is continued throughout the second year. The work consists of the study of some 
of the more advanced principles of grammar, and especially of the reading of 
scientific German, dealing with a variety of subjects, and the translation of com- 
mercial German. [Course IV.] 

Economics — E-30. Preparation: E-10. This course, meeting three times 
a week, is conducted by means of lectures, discussions, and recitations, supple- 
mented by textbook reading and study of charts analyzing various phases of 
industrial problems. The character of the course is descriptive and practical 
rather than theoretical, and the aim is to acquaint the student with the accepted 
principles of economics and some of their applications to industrial conditions. 

The course will also deal briefly with economic history, showing how the present 
economic system has evolved from past systems and pointing out how the experi- 
ence of the past can aid in the solution of present problems. 

Besides the historical material, other topics discussed are the nature and scope 
of economics; the evolution of economic society; the three factors of production, 
land, labor and capital; the four elements in distribution, rent, wages, interest and 
profits; business organization; value and price; monopoly; money, credit and 
banking; international trade; protection and free trade; transportation; insur- 
ance; economic activities of municipalities; and public finance. In short, it is an 
outline course dealing with the fundamental principles that underlie a wide range 
of activities. [Courses IV, VI.] 

COTTON DEPARTMENT — F 

Cotton Carding— F-20. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-14. This course ex- 
tends throughout the second year and includes instruction starting with the growth, 
classes and characteristics of cotton and continues on through all the mill opera- 
tions preparatory to spinning. 

Cotton Production. — A study of the areas of the world producing cottons 
and the characteristics of the world's commercial cottons forms the major por- 
tion of this division of the work. Particular emphasis is given to the various 
American cottons. The different methods of ginning and the by-products from 
the cotton seed are studied here. 

Cotton Marketing. — The customary methods of concentrating and distrib- 
uting raw cotton come under this heading, which includes a study of the handling 
of cotton for spot sales and through the exchanges. It includes also a study of 
the classing of cottons, which involves instruction regarding the Federal Stand- 
ards for classing and the terms commonly used by mills in handling purchases 
of cotton. 

Opening. — The various machines used in opening raw cotton are studied in 
considerable detail, following which, typical layouts of the various machines in 
series, as used by different mills, are taken as illustrations of how these machines 
can be arranged for various conditions. 

Picking. — Particular emphasis is used in instructing the student in the new 
arrangements being developed for the picker room. Such standard subjects as 


50 

eveners, lap measuring motions, grids and beaters are followed with illustrations 
of their application to the single process pickers. The effect of varying humidi- 
ties on proper lap weights and future results in the card room are clearly pointed 
out under this heading. Draft, production and waste calculations complete the 
instruction on pickers. 

Carding. — The process of carding is considered one of the most important, and 
proper time is devoted to the construction and operation of cards, that the stu- 
dent may be familiar with the various parts of the card and the function and 
design of each. The construction and application of card clothing, as well as the 
methods of grinding, form a part of the work. The proper procedure for oper- 
ating cards to get the proper size and production and to keep them in proper 
mechanical condition to produce good work occupy considerable of the time 
given to carding. The calculations for draft, production and percent of waste 
completely cover these subjects as connected with carding. 

Drawing. — Under this head is taken up the theory of doublings and their 
effect upon the quality of roving and yarn. Like previous and subsequent 
processes the machine construction forms an important part of the work. Proper 
stress is paid to such subjects as stop motions, drawing rolls and their covering, 
cleaners and evener motions. The calculations cover draft, production, roll crimp 
and improvement in uniformity. 

Combing. — This process is explained by lecture work and by operation and 
assembling of the various types of combs in service in the laboratory. The object 
of combing is fully considered, and the different means employed on the many 
types of combers on the market is studied. This includes such types as the 
Heilman, New Whitin and Nasmith combers. Considerable time is spent in 
studying the many comb adjustments, their purpose and how they should be 
used to produce the desired quality of work. The proper care of the comb is 
explained. The subject includes the necessary calculations for draft, noilage and 
production. 

Roving. — Under this heading the frames called the slubber, intermediate, fine 
and jack are studied. The numerous changes and adjustments necessary to pro- 
duce good work are stressed, with special emphasis on the less obvious subjects 
of lay and tension. Roth English and American types of frames are used. The 
cotton system for sizing rovings and yarns is studied here, following which, such 
calculations as draft, twist, lay, tension and production complete the work of the 
roving operations. 

Laboratory. — An extensive series of laboratory projects are carried out simul- 
taneously with the lecture instruction. These laboratory classes illustrate the 
principles developed in the class room and extend the class room work to practi- 
cal application and operation. After work in classing raw cottons, cotton is 
processed using different adjustments, thus showing the results of the changes. 
Sufficient quantities of stock are processed so that the roving made is later spun 
into yarns and manufactured into cloth by the student. [Course I.] 

Cotton Carding — F-20a. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-14. This course is 
similar to Course F-20, except that there is much less time devoted to lecture and 
laboratory work. [Courses III, VI, Options G, C, D, ( S.] 

Cotton Spinning— F-30. Preparation: F-20. This course extends through- 
out the third year and includes instruction on spinning, spoofing, winding, twisting, 
reefing and baling. 

Ring Spinning and Twisting. — This part of the course covers all kinds of 
ring spinning and twisting frames, their construction, principles of their actions 
and calculations. Particular emphasis is given to the production of yarns for 
different uses, in order that the desirable characteristics may be obtained. As 
the twister so closely resembles the spinning frame in many ways, the two oper- 
ations are studied in succession to avoid duplication. The defects commonly 
found in yams and methods of eliminating them require considerable attention. 
The methods of sizing yarns and the calculations for determining draft, twist 
and production are important factors in this work. 

Mule Spinning. — Although less common than formerly in American mills, the 
mule is still of sufficient importance to warrant a study of its major motions. 


51 

The advantages of mule yarns are clearly shown and the more common calcula- 
tions for draft, twist and production are given. 

Spooling and Winding. — These methods of preparing yarns for twisting and 
warping are fully explained. The machines are studied for the mechanical con- 
struction and adjustment. The calculations are largely in connection with pro- 
duction. 

Reeling and Baling. — This work covers the winding of yarns into skeins on 
various types of reels, the calculations for producing skeins of a desired size and 
the adjustment of stop motions for measuring the desired yardage. The pack- 
ing of skeins into bales follows the reeling. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work for this course consists of a series of proj- 
ects particularly intended to illustrate the important features of the various 
machines and their products. In addition, considerable time is spent in pro- 
ducing yarns in sufficient quantities to give the student some practical experi- 
ence in operating the machine and handling the rovings and yarns required. 
[Course I.] 

Cotton Spinning — F-30a. Preparation: F-20a. This course is similar 
to Course F-30 except that there is much less time devoted to laboratory work. 
[Courses III, YI, Options G, C, D, S.] 

Knitting — F-31. Preparation: B-12, D-10. This course, commencing with 
a study of hosiery yarns and their preparation for knitting, includes a study of the 
various stitches and their application in commercial fabrics; a study of the different 
knitting machines, including circular and flat, spring and latch needle machines, 
used in the manufacture of stockings, sweaters and underwear; and a study of 
looping and sewing machines. Part of the work consists of the assembling and 
adjusting of different types of knitting machines. 

In addition, considerable time is spent in the analysis of knitted fabrics. [Courses 
I, II.] 

Knitting — F-31a. Preparation: B-12, D-10. This course embraces the 
same lectures as Course F-31 but does not include any laboratory work. [Course 
VI, Options G, C, W, S.] 

Cotton Organization — F-32. Preparation: F-20 or F-20a. This course 
correlates all the work in the Department of Cotton Yarns. The student is in- 
structed how cotton yarn mill organizations are made, by the study of actual mill 
organizations, showing the drafts, doublings and sizes in use. This is followed by 
the calculation of machinery necessary to equip a given plant and the arrangement 
of this machinery in the mill building. Some time is given to the study of special 
equipment not specifically covered in other classes. [Courses I, YI, Options G, C.] 

Thesis — F-34. Each student is required to present a thesis which is a report 
of some original work. This is sometimes the construction of some yarn or fabric 
to meet certain requirements. At other times the work is a study of some technical 
problem regarding the effect of certain changes in manufacturing conditions. 
[Course I.] 

WOOL DEPARTMENT— G 

Fiber Preparation — G-20. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-13. Raw Ma- 
terials. — A study of raw materials which enter into the manufacture of woolen 
or worsted yarns, or are made into yarns by processes similar to those employed 
in the manufacture of woolen and worsted yarns, would include silk, mohair, 
alpaca, vicuna, cashmere, earners hair, cotton, flax, hemp, jute and ramie. 

Wool Sorting. — Familiarity with the various grades and kinds of wool is 
obtained by lecture and by actual sorting of fleece wool under the direction of an 
experienced wool sorter. The various characteristics and properties are ex- 
plained, as are also trade names, such as picklock, XXX, XX, ^-blood, %-blood, 
^4-blood, delaine, braid, etc. Some skill is acquired in the estimation of shrink- 
age and in judging the spinning qualities. 

Wool Scouring. — The object of scouring and the methods employed are ex- 
plained, and this involves the consideration of the soaps and chemicals used in 
washing; also the waste products and their utilization. Actual work is done in 
scouring a commercial quantity of wool by machines that are made similar in 
operation to regular commercial machines. A study is made of the effect of the 


52 

hardness of water upon soap; also tests are made to show this effect. At the 
same time the use of dryers, their operation and regulation, is taken up. 

Top Making and Combing. — This branch takes up in all detail the carding of 
wool on a worsted card, the preparing processes, back-washing and Vigoureaux 
printing, also gilling of the stock before and after combing. The construction of 
the gill boxes and combs is studied by lectures and by dismantling and assem- 
bling these machines in the laboratories. Later, quantities of stock are made 
into top and then into yarn. 

The Noble comb is studied, and the various calculations to determine draft, 
noiling, tear, productions, etc., are made. [Courses II, III, VI, Options G, W, 
D, S.] 

Woolen Yarn and Shoddy Manufacture — G-21. Preparation: B-10, 
B-12, B-13. Reworked Fiber or Shoddy. — Rags of all kinds are studied, sorted, 
and all processes necessary to convert them into fiber are covered in detail. 

Wool Blending, Oiling and Picking. — Mixing and shading of colors and 
qualities of wool are studied and practiced. The details of burr pickers and 
mixing pickers including the Fearnaught are studied in full. The importance of 
oils and emulsions is stressed in lecture and laboratory. 

Woolen Carding. — The system of carding wool for woolen yarn is fully ex- 
plained, as is also the construction, setting and operation of the cards. A part of 
the work is the reclothing and grinding of the cylinders, strippers, workers, etc. 
The carding of suitable and commercial quantities of wool, and the further 
manufacture of it into yarn, serves to fix the principles of carding in the mind 
of the student, as well as to give him some skill in handling machinery. 

Woolen Spinning. — The computations necessary in converting roping into 
yam are fully explained. The details of construction and operation of the spring 
and cam type mule are well covered in lectures and practice. The theory and 
practice of continuous or ring spinning for woolen is also taken up. The con- 
ditioning of yarn after spinning by steaming is explained. 

Costs and details of a yarn mill are mentioned in brief as well as some causes 
of poor yarn and its effect on mill production. [Courses II, III, VI, Options G, 
W, D, S.] 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture — G-30. Preparation: G-20. Intersecting Gill 
Boxes and French Comb. — The equipment of the laboratory offers opportunity 
for the production of dry-combed top and its comparison with oil-combed top 
produced on the Noble comb. The structures and uses of intersecting gill boxes 
and the study of combing and drawing blends is taken up at this point. 

Drawing and Spinning. — The laboratory equipment consisting of the Brad- 
ford (English) system of drawing, of both open and cone types, as well as the 
various processes of French drawing, followed by both worsted mule and ring 
spinning frame, make possible a thorough study of the manufacture of worsted 
yarn by all of the existing methods. 

The same method of study of mechanisms, calculations, and operations of the 
various machines is followed as in the case of previous methods of instruction. 
The student by pursuing this course can compare the different methods of yarn 
manufacture and note the results of each. 

Organization. — At the end of the course the layout of a properly balanced 
yarn mill is studied, and at the same time the cost of machinery, depreciation, 
labor costs and machinery arrangements. 

Thesis. — Before graduation the student must present visible evidence of his 
knowledge of woolen and worsted manufacture by the production of twenty 
yards of fabric from his own design (or reproduction or modification of some 
existing fabric) beginning with the raw material. 

A formal typewritten description, including all calculations and observations, 
together with samples from each machine, must be presented to the head of the 
department before the final examination. [Courses II, III, VI, Options G, W, 
D, S.] 

Textile Testing — G-31. Preparation: B-23, F-30 or G-30, D-24. The 
object of this course is to familiarize the student with present-day methods of 
determining the physical properties of textile fibers, yarns and fabrics. The ap- 
plication of physical laws and methods of measurements, as studied in the course 


53 

of Physics, is used in the study of physical characteristics of textile material. The 
work is given to students in advanced courses, and consists of lecture and labora- 
tory work. Reports are prepared from each experiment, giving the object of the 
experiment, method of procedure, observation and conclusions, in order that the 
student may acquire practice and understand the interpretation of data. A special 
testing laboratory is provided, and a considerable number of the best standard 
fiber, yarn and fabric testing instruments of foreign and American make have been 
installed and are used for instruction in the testing of textile materials. The labora- 
tory is equipped with means for making and keeping the humidity constant, so 
that tests can be made under uniform or standard conditions of humidity and 
temperature. [Courses I, II, III.] 

Technology of Wool Manufacture — Lectures and Demonstrations — 
G-40. Preparation: C-21, C-32, D-10. This course is planned to supplement 
the instruction already given in design, cloth construction, chemical technology 
of fibers, scouring, dyeing and finishing, with sufficient lectures and demonstrations 
in sorting, scouring, backwashing, gilling, combing, top-making, English drawing, 
spinning, twisting, warping, and weaving, to make the processing of grease wool and 
allied fibers into ordinary worsted spun yarn fabrics, clear as to object and con- 
tinuity. 

The manufacture of virgin and reworked wool into woolen spun fabrics, with 
scouring, carbonizing, mixing, picking, carding, spinning, twisting, warping and 
weaving is also given. Illustrated descriptions of the manufacture of hardened, 
woven and needle loom felts are taken up. 

Mechanical details and calculations are subordinated to familiarizing the student 
with the nature and object of the several processes. [Course IV.] 

FINISHING DEPARTMENT— H 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing — H-30. Preparation: B-12, C-10, D-10, 
D-24. The outline of this course, which is given by means of lecture and laboratory 
work, is as follows : — A 

Burling and Mending. — Under this head is taken up for consideration the 
examination of flannel as it comes from the loom ; the construction, use and loca- 
tion of the perch; the methods used in marking defects, measuring, weighing and 
numbering of cloths; also the methods of inspection for fancies, single cloths and 
double cloths. The object of burling, mending and the types bf tables employed, 
the method of removing knots, runners, etc., the object of back shearing and the 
use of burling irons, the replacing of missing threads and the importance of sew- 
ing as a part of the finishing process, are all considered in detail. The removal of 
oil and tar spots as well as stains of various kinds is studied. 

Fulling. — This branch covers a study of the conditions of the flannel as it 
comes from the loom, and the influence of oil, etc., upon the procedure. Con- 
siderable time is devoted to the various methods of producing a felt, the early 
types of stocks, hammer falling and crank stocks, and their modifications and 
development into the present type of rotary fulling mills of both the single and 
double variety. The details of construction in all machines are carefully taken 
up and include the design and composition of the main rolls, methods of cover- 
ing, regulation and means of adjusting the pressure of traps and rolls, considera- 
tion of the shoes, the use and regulation of the various types of stop motion, the 
different types of stretchers, guide rolls and throat plates. 

The theory of felt is taken up and the influence of pressure, moisture, heat, 
alkali and acid is considered, as well as the hydroscopic and felting properties of 
different wool fibers. The preparation of the flannel for the mill and the usual 
methods of determining shrinkages, as well as the various methods of soaping, 
are given careful attention. The preparation of various fulling soaps and the 
value of each for the reduction of various degrees of felt as well as the determi- 
nation of the proper amount of alkali for various goods, are carefully studied 
and demonstrated. The manipulation of the various kinds of goods in the mill, 
viz., all wool, shoddies and mixed goods, is studied in classroom and by operation 
in the mill. 

The change in weight and strength for each operation is carefully considered, 
as is also the value of the flocks made in each. A study of the various methods 


54 

of flocking, such as dry and wet, is considered in both class and machine rooms. 
In each operation the defects likely to materialize are studied, as well as the 
cause thereof, and various methods of modifying or lessening them. 

Washing and Speck Dyeing. — This branch considers the scouring, rinsing 
and washing of goods both before and after the fulling process; the various types 
of washers; and the details of construction, such as suds box, rolls, etc. The 
theory of scouring, uses of Fuller’s earth, salt solutions and scours on the different 
kinds of goods are made clear by practical work in the machine room, where the 
effects due to improper scouring, such as stains, cloudy effects, wrinkles and un- 
clean goods, are demonstrated. The discussion of the necessity of speck dyeing 
follows naturally from the study of these matters, and includes methods of 
preparation, materials used, application and tests required. 

Carbonizing. — This is an important branch of finishing, and includes a study 
of the various carbonizing agents, methods of application, strength of solutions, 
and neutralizing, as well as the machines used. Stains and imperfections result- 
ing from carbonizing are also considered. The drying and tentering machines 
and extractors employed are taken up at this point. 

Gigging, Napping, Steaming, Singeing and Crabbing. — The construction in 
detail of the various types of gigs, nappers, steamers, wet gigs, rolling, stretch- 
ing, crabbing, and singeing machines is discussed, and their actions upon the cloth 
and the results obtained are explained. 

Various methods of obtaining luster and the production of permanent finish 
are considered in connection with steaming and sponging. 

Brushing, Shearing and Pressing. — This includes, as do the other branches, 
a careful treatment of the machine employed, the preparation of the cloth for 
each process, the action of each machine in producing its part of the resultant 
effect. In manipulation of the shear consideration is given to its setting, grind- 
ing and adjustment. With the brushing machine the effect of steaming and 
moisture upon the luster and feel of the goods is shown. A study of the action 
of the presses, both plate and rotary, involves consideration of pressure, steam- 
ing, etc. Special processes to obtain particular effects are taken up, and the part 
played by each machine is explained. The details involved in handling cloth on 
a commercial scale, as, for example, measuring, weighing, ticketing, numbering 
and rolling, are also explained. The necessary calculation and the methods of 
finishing all grades of goods are considered from time to time during the year. 
[Courses II, III, IV, VI, Options G, W, D, S.] 

Cotton Finishing — H-31. Preparation: B-12, C-10, D-10, D-24. The 
outline of the course in the finishing of cotton fabrics is as follows: — 

Cloth Room. — Instruction of the various goods and the object thereof; con- 
struction of the various types of inspecting and trimming machines. 

Shearing. — The object. A consideration of the various types of shears for 
treating one or both sides at the same time; also the use of the usual cleaning 
devices, such as emery, sand and card rolls, beaters and brushes; grinding and 
the adjustment of the various parts. 

The use of brushing and cleaning machines, rolling devices and calender attach- 
ments for gray goods. 

Singeing. — Developing and object of singeing; the construction of singers of 
all types and for various purposes; the use of cooling tanks; steaming devices, 
rolling and brushing attachments. 

Regulation of the flame for various goods, and adjustment of the parts; gas 
and air pressure, water-cooled rolls; the effect of moisture on the cost of singe- 
ing and use of dry cans in connection with singeing; electric singeing. 

Washing. — Open width and string washers, their construction and operation; 
soaps, temperature, squeeze rolls; washing of various goods and the object there- 
of; stains. 

Napping. — The object of napping and the usual method of treating goods; 
various types of nappers, single and double acting; felting nappers; construc- 
tion, grinding and adjustments of various types. 

Water Mangles. — Their objects and the construction of various types; vari- 
ous rolls, iron, husk, etc.; scutchers, their object and constructions. 


55 

Starch Mangles. — The object and construction of all types of starch mangles 
for pure starch and filled goods; various types of rolls, brass, rubber, wood; 
action of doctor blades, etc.; regulation and object of pressure. 

Methods of starching and finishing all standard goods, also a consideration of 
the various substances used, such as starch, softener and fillers; the preparation 
of starch and various methods of application. 

Dryers and Stretchers. — Both horizontal and vertical types of drying cans, 
tenter frames, clips, etc.; the swing motion and the finishes thus produced; ob- 
ject and construction of spraying machines, belt stretchers, short tenters, button 
breakers, etc. 

Calenders. — The object and construction of all types, including the regula- 
tion of pressure and nips for the production of various finishes; various types 
of rolls and their uses, — steel, husk, cotton, paper, etc., the use of hot and cold 
rolls; chasing, friction, embossing and Schreiner calenders, and the various 
finishes produced by each; production of watered effects; beetling machines and 
hydraulic mangles. 

Making-up room, — yarding, inspecting; different types of folds; pressing, 
papering, marking. [Courses I, III, VI, Options G, C, D, S.] 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

All members of the freshman class are required to take a course in physical 
training conducted in the gymnasium under the direction of an instructor in 
physical education. Two periods per week for the entire first year are devoted 
to this work. At the beginning of the year a full record is made of the physical 
examinations carried on by the instructor and a reputable physician that proper 
and beneficial exercise may be prescribed. 

The object is to give general instruction in the care and strengthening of the 
body, and to so guide the students that they may continue to give proper thought 
to their physical training that their mental development may have its greatest 
effect. 

Proper gymnasium clothing is required and all students must take a shower 
bath following each exercise. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of machinery, inventoried at $330,850.00, is most varied for 
textile educational purposes, and is being constantly augmented. The builders 
of the various machines installed keep in close touch with the Institute, adding to 
the machines such improvements as are made from time to time, and each year 
some new machine will be added by a manufacturer who finds it to his advantage 
to be represented here. This operates to the mutual advantage of student and 
manufacturer. 

Cotton Yarn Department. — The opening and picking section of this depart- 
ment contains a 50-saw Pratt gin used for experimental purposes. For classing 
work, there is a specially equipped section with north fight, where Universal 
Standard Grades and Government Staple Standards are available. 

The picking equipment consists of a 40-inch Saco-Lowell three beater single 
process picker. This machine is equipped with blade beaters in the first two sec- 
tions and either a blade or a Kirschner beater in the third section. It has the new 
blending reserve, automatic rack release and the hunting cog knock-off. 

The card section has three standard revolving flat top cards, one each from 
Saco-Lowell, Whitin, and Howard and Bullough shops. 

The combing section consists of a sliver lapper, one four-head ribbon lapper, one 
two-head comb, and one eight-head comb, all from the Whitin Machine Works. 
There is also one two-head Nasmith comb from John Hetherington and Sons of 
England. 

The drawing frames are all of the single head type. There are two four-delivery 
drawing frames and one railway head from the Saco-Lowell Shops. One frame is 
equipped with both common and metallic drawing rolls, electric stop motions and 
Ermine top roll clearers. The other frame and the railway head both are equipped 
with metallic rolls and mechanical stop motions. Another frame of two deliveries 
is from the Howard and Bullough shops. It has electric stop motions and metallic 
drawing rolls. 


56 

The roving section has a complete equipment, slubber, intermediate, fine and 
jack frame from the Saco-Lowell Shops, In addition, there is an intermediate 
frame made by the Woonsocket Machine and Press Company, and a fine frame 
from Howard and Bullough. The last named serves to illustrate the common 
English construction and how it differs from the American construction as illus- 
trated in the other roving machines. 

The spinning equipment is quite varied both with respect to builders and with 
respect to types and sizes. The Saco-Lowell Shops have supplied five different 
frames varying from 36 to 216 spindles. They are suitable to spin counts from 3s 
to 80s. One is equipped with the Saco-Lowell Roth long-draft system, while an- 
other has a special five-roll, long-draft system built in the Institute. A sixth Saco- 
Lowell frame was supplied by the Acme Machine Company equipped with Chapman 
ball-bearing spindles. Four of these frames are equipped with individual motor 
drives,— one chain drive, one Texrope drive, one gear drive and one Washburn 
clutch drive. The Whitin Machine Works is represented by three frames on which 
counts from 3s to over 100s can be spun. One of these frames has an auxiliary 
equipment of SKF roller-bearing spindles and is fitted on one side with Casablanca 
long-draft equipment. The Howard and Bullough shops have one spinning frame 
suitable for counts from average to fine. This is equipped with an English type of 
builder which distinguishes it from the other frames, and has an individual alter- 
nating current motor connected through a Reeves automatically controlled variable 
speed drive. One Fales and Jenks frame is present, equipped on one side with the 
Casablanca long-draft system. This machine is equipped with an individual 
alternating current motor with a chain drive. One spinning mule has been retained 
to illustrate this peculiar type of spinning. It is from Asa Lees Company of 
England and is suitable for counts above 30. 

There is one short spooler from the Saco-Lowell Shops. There are two winders 
from the Foster Machine Company, one for single ends either on cones or tubes, 
the other for one, two, or three ends parallel wound, especially for preparation for 
twisting. There is also a one gang Universal No. 50 winder with individual drive 
suitable for winding ordinary tubes or Franklin Process packages. 

The twisters are suitable for all counts. There is one each from the Saco-Lowell, 
the Howard and Bullough, and the Fales and Jenks Shops. These are all equipped 
for either wet or dry twisting of average and fine counts. There are two twisters 
from the Draper Corporation. These are equipped for wet or dry twisting for 
coarse counts or heavy plies. 

The department has a complete coiler waste system as made by the Saco-Lowell 
Shops, consisting of a 40-inch single coiler side delivery breaker card; a 40-end 
derby doubler; a 40-inch four coiler finisher card; a combination slubber-inter- 
mediate and a waste spinning frame. The cards are both equipped with Chapman 
neutralizers intended to overcome any trouble originating from static electricity. 
This equipment is suitable to spin coarse numbers from cotton wastes to be used 
in such materials as coarse sheeting, osnaburgs, twine and mop yarns. 

To prepare mill wastes for re-use there is one single cylinder roving waste opener 
and one thread extractor, both from the Saco-Lowell Shops. 

With the exception of the opening-picking room the humidity in this department 
is controlled automatically by a system installed by the American Moistening Com- 
pany. Seven high duty heads supply the necessary moisture and air circulation. 
An adjustable automatic control regulates the humidity to the desired percent. 

The experimental laboratory is equipped with a power driven skein tester for 
determining yarn strength and a Moscrop single thread tester for single end 
strength. There are twist counters for determining the amount of twist and the 
twist contraction. For fine work and for fiber study, there is an analytical balance 
and a Spencer microscope equipped with three objectives, three oculars, ocular 
micrometer, mechanical stage and Abb6 condenser. In addition, there is a gas 
conditioning oven to use in determining moisture content and regain. A number 
of scales and balances, together with yarn reels, roving reels and measuring boards 
make up the equipment for routine mill sizing tests. 

Knitting Section. — The winders for this section include a six-spindle No. 50 
cone winder, equipped with swifts for winding from skeins, suitable for fine cotton, 


57 

worsted, silk and rayon yarns, and a Payne bobbin winder suitable for coarse 
woolen, worsted and cotton yarns. 

In the automatic hosiery machine section are included three Banner machines, — 
220 and 200 needle full hose machines and a 160 needle half hose machine; four 
Scott & Williams Machines, — a 200 needle B-5, a 220 needle Model K, a 220 
needle HH and a 160 needle RI. This section also includes two Acme stationary 
cylinder machines, a Mayo model C full automatic and a Brinton footer. For 
fundamental instruction a Branson 80 needle hand machine is included. For 
hosiery legs and tops there are five ribbers, made by the Wildman Company, with 
cylinders varying from 3 Yr^ l A and arranged for needles varying in number from 
160-240; two Brinton ribbers, one arranged for 176 needles and the other 200 
needles; one Brinton tie machine, 1%-inch cylinder 100 needles and 49 needles; 
one Universal Ribber 3J^inch diameter, 160 needles. To illustrate the fully 
fashioned type of knitting hosiery there is an 18 section, 39 gauge Reading legger, 
with topping stand. 

The underwear machinery consists of one Crane spring needle machine, one Scott 
& Williams ribber, and one Wildman ribber. 

Under the group of flat machines there are three Lamb machines, one arranged 
for knitting gloves and one arranged for knitting sweaters. In addition to these 
there is also a Grosser sweater machine, a Jacquard machine, and a link and link 
machine; a Dubied scarf machine; and a Raschel warp knitter. 

For finishing work this section includes a Grosser 2-thread looper, one Hepworth 
looper, two Beattie loopers, a Sotco 24-point looper with an individual table and 
motor drive; five Union Special sewing machines for overseaming, double stitch 
covering, seaming and welting and vest finishing; six Merrow sewing machines, 
including two shell stitch machines and three overseaming and crocheting machines; 
three Singer machines; three Wilcox & Gibbs sewing machines, including a flat- 
lock machine. 

The Philadelphia Metal Drying Form Company has installed a table of six forms 
including men’s, women’s and children’s. 

For instruction in the manufacture of braids the New England Butt Company 
has installed one 24-line Hercules braider, one 12-line braider, one tubular braider, 
and one soutache braider. 


Woolen Yarns Division. — The following machinery and equipment is avail- 
able for use in the manufacture of yarn on the woolen principle. 

Installed by Davis & Furber Machine Company of North Andover, Mass.: 
One wool mixing picker equipped with hopper feed (George S. Harwood & Son), 
one modern 60x40 three cylinder set of cards, single breaker and double finisher, 
each driven by Westinghouse variable speed motors through silent Whitney chains, 
improved Bramwell breaker feed by Harwood & Sons, Davis and Furber Broadband 
intermediate feed and 80 end four bank single apron tape condenser with all change 
gears and pulleys; one set 48x40 cards with single breaker, intermediate, and finisher 
cylinders, Bramwell breaker feed, latest type Apperly-Harwood transfer feeds with 
40 end ring doffers and two apron condenser; one Model B latest type woolen ring 
spinning frame, motor driven, with 60 spindles 2}4-mch rings; one 120 spindle 
spring mule with bobbin holders by the American Bobbin Holder Company; one 
mule headstock mounted on trucks for instruction purposes; one fancy yarn twister 
with chain and gear equipment; one filet winding drum stand with tension bars, 
wind, etc., for applying card clothing. 

Installed by C. G. Sargent’s Sons Corporation, Graniteville, Mass.: One mul- 
tiplex burr picker for medium wools, one yarn conditioning machine with motor 
drive. 

Installed by Johnson and Bassett, Inc., of Worcester, Mass.: One 120-spindle 
cam mule complete; one mule headstock mounted on trucks for instruction 
purposes. 

Installed by Torrance Manufacturing Company: One sample mixing card for 
blending and matching wool. 

Installed by B. S. Roy & Son, Worcester, Mass.: One card grinding stand with 
two traverse grinders complete. 

Equipment: Modern ferrule type fiber head jack spools and bobbins by U. S. 
Bobbin and Shuttle Company of Lawrence; yarn baskets by Steele Supply Com- 


58 

pany, Cambridge, Mass.; hand cards by Howard Brothers of Worcester and Davis 
& Furber Machine Company; ring travellers by Victor Company; static suppressors 
by Chapman Neutralizer Company. 

Shoddy or Reworked Fiber Division. — Installed by C. G. Sargent's Sons 
Corporation: One cypress screw acid dip tank; one single apron dryer (baker) ; one 
cone carbonizing duster with crush rolls. 

Installed by Schaum & Uhlinger, one steam hydro-extractor. 

Installed by C. S. Dodge of Lowell, one ball bearing rag picker with condenser, 
one bagging stand. 

Installed by John T. Slack Corporation are hundreds of samples of reworked 
wool in all stages from rags to fiber. 

Wool Preparing Division. — Wool sorting and grading is carried on under ex- 
cellent conditions with the following equipment: sorting bench, baskets, bagging 
stands, etc. 

Installed by C. G. Sargent's Sons Corporation: One grease wool cone duster, 
one four bowl scouring train with large hopper feed; one single apron dryer with 
large feeder. 

Top Making Division. — Top for the Bradford or French system is made with 
the following machinery: One double cylinder worsted card (four licker-in) with 
can coiler and balling head, complete, by Davis & Furber Machine Company, and 
with a Bramwell automatic feeder supplied by George S. Harwood & Sons. An 
electric neutralizer is furnished on card by the Chapman Electric Neutralizer Com- 
pany. This section also includes a double bowl, 5-cylinder backwasher, with gill 
box, Taylor- Wordsworth & Co., Leeds, England, equipped with blueing motion, 
oiling motion, and Layland patent pressure motion; a weigh gill box and creel and 
one doubling balling head gill box (with double screws) made by the Saco-Lowell 
Shops of Biddeford, Me.; two worsted combs with bailer punch, one made by 
Crompton & Knowles, Worcester, and the second made by James Smith & Sons, 
of Worcester, Mass.; two finishing gill boxes, one known as a can gill box and the 
other a balling head gill box, both made by Hall & Stell, Keighley, England. 

Worsted Yarn Division. — Bradford or English System: For the manufac- 
ture of yarns under the Bradford System of Drawing, Spinning, and Twisting, the 
following machinery as made by Prince Smith & Son, Keighley, England, make up 
the equipment: one revolving creel for 12 balls, one 2-spindle drawing box, one 
4-spindle first finisher, one 12-spindle dandy reducer, one 12-spindle cap spinner, 
one double head can gill box, one 2-spindle gill box, one 2-spindle flyer spinner, one 
12-spindle ring spinner, one 12-spindle 2-fold cap twister, one 12-spindle 6-fold 
ring twister. In addition to this the Saco-Lowell Shops, Biddeford, Me., have in- 
stalled the following machinery to carry on similar w T ork : one 2-spindle drawing box, 
one 6-spindle second finisher, one 24-spindle dandy rover, one 6-spindle cone re- 
ducer, one 8-spindle cone rover, one 48-spindle cap spinner, 5-foot end, one 48- 
spindle cap spinner, 4-foot end, one 48-spindle Boy ring twister. The Universal 
Winding Company has installed one of its 6-gang winders, equipped for cones or 
straight tubes. The Lindsay-Hyde Company has installed a modern skein winder. 

The humidity in the laboratory of the woolen yarns and of the English system 
of worsted yarns is maintained by the American Moistening Company's system 
through its automatic control. In this laboratory are installed six humidifiers 
and four Comin's High Duty heads, which are supplied from an electric-driven 
triplex power pump located in the power house. This same pumping equipment 
supplies the American Moistening Company's humidifiers operating in the Cotton 
Yarn Department. 

French System. — For the manufacture of worsted yarns under the French 
System of Drawing and Spinning, the machinery has been made by the Soci6t4 
Alsacienne de Constructions Mechaniques, Mulhouse, France, and the equipment 
consists of the following: Model P. L. B. comb with creel for 24 doublings, inter- 
secting gill box (2 heads), gill box (2 heads), first drawing (2 heads), second drawing 
(2 heads), third drawing (2 heads), reducer (4 porcupines), slubber (8 porcupines), 
first intermediate (8 porcupines), second intermediate (8 porcupines), rover (8 
porcupines), finisher (16 porcupines), self-acting worsted mule (150 spindles). 

The Saco-Lowell Shops built and installed a ring spinning frame of 60 spindles 


59 

for worsted yarns equipped with individual General Electric Company’s motor 
and a Reeves Variable Speed Transmission. 

Twenty-one turbo humidifier heads automatically controlled by a humidity 
regulator have been furnished by the G. M. Parks Company, Fitchburg, Mass. The 
compressed air for these heads is supplied by an Ingersoll-Rand 8 by 8 steam-driven 
air compressor. 

Textile Testing Division. — Complete equipment is available for testing all 
kinds of fibers and fabrics under controlled conditions for breaking strength, 
elasticity, elongation, physical structure, moisture content, oil content, thickness, 
bursting strength, count of yarn, yards per pound, twist, resistance to abrasion and 
other tests of commercial or experimental importance. This equipment includes 
the necessary microscopes and micrometers, a skein-testing machine, and electric 
conditioning oven made by the Emerson Apparatus Company of Boston; single 
yarn and fabric strength-testing machines made by G. R. Smith & Company, 
Bradford, England; a strength-testing machine, capacity 500 kilograms, for testing 
twines and fabrics; a fiber-testing machine for testing fibers and fine yarns with 
capacity, 1 gram to 1.5 kilograms; a yarn strength-testing machine with capacity 
1,000 to 5,000 grams; and a yarn strength-testing machine with capacity 5 to 30 
kilograms, all of which have been made by Louis Schopper, Leipzig, Germany. 
In addition to these there is a standard yarn and fabric testing machine made by 
Henry L. Scott & Company of Providence, R. I., a Mullen Tester, a special abrasion 
machine for testing the resistance to wear of carpets and other pile fabrics, also an 
abrasion machine for testing resistance to wear of twines, tapes, and all stripped flat 
fabrics, one General Electric mercury vapor lamp with stand for top inspection. 
For the automatic control of temperature and humidity there has been installed by 
the American Moistening Company, of Boston, one of its automatic humidity and 
temperature regulators. 

Design and Power Weaving Department, — In the fabric analysis section 
there have been provided chemical balances made by Voland & Sons and Christian 
Becker, necessary twist testers, microscopes, reels, etc., as well as a Torsion cal- 
culation balance made by the Torsion Balance Company of New York. 

In the warp preparation department there has been installed by the Saco- 
Lowell Shops one of its spoolers, and a slasher for preparing cotton warps ; also a 
high speed warper, by T. C. Entwistle Company of Lowell. The Whitin Machine 
Company, Whitinsville, Mass., has supplied a 180-spindle, long chain quiller, and 
the Johnson & Bassett Company, Worcester, Mass., a quiller of its make. The 
Universal Winding Company has supplied a winder for cop and bobbin winding 
and an 8-spindle doubler, also a winder for the high speed warper. 

The woolen and worsted warp preparation department contains two 40-end 
jack spoolers, two spool racks for 12 spools each, one pattern dry frame dresser, 
one pipe and cylinder dresser, one 60-inch reel, one 82-inch reel, and one double 
head beamer, all supplied by the Davis & Furber Machine Company of North 
Andover, Mass. 

The Weaving Department contains four looms supplied by the Draper Cor- 
poration of Hopedale, Mass., which include a plain Northrup, an 8-harness cor- 
duroy, an improved Northrup, a Northrup with dobby. The Stafford Loom Com- 
pany of Readville, Mass., has installed one plain, one cam, one dobby loom and 
one broad sheeting loom, all equipped with individual motors; the Whitin Machine 
Works, Whitinsville, Mass., a side cam twill, a plain print cloth loom, equipped 
with Kip-Armstrong electric warp stop motion; Crompton & Knowles Loom Works 
a jean loom and a plain loom with individual drive. Four of these looms are 
equipped with Abbott cleavers made by the Abbott Wire and Cast Steel Warp 
Cleaving Company, Lisbon Falls, Maine. The Hopedale Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Milford, Mass., has recently installed one of its high speed looms with 
individual motor. 

The fancy loom section includes a Stafford Ideal 16-harness automatic shuttle- 
changing loom, a Whitin 20-harness dobby loom, and the following furnished by the 
Crompton & Knowles Loom Works: Knowles gingham 4 by 1 boxes, Crompton 
gingham 4 by 1 boxes, one Crompton towel 2 by 1 boxes, two Terry towel and one 
huck towel looms, a 16-harness lappet loom, a 20-harness dobby 4 by 1 boxes, 
fancy leno loom, and a Crompton fancy cotton single cylinder 20-harness dobby. 

The woolen and worsted section contains a Knowles 20-harness Gem, a Crompton 


60 

24-harness worsted 4 by 4 boxes, a Crompton 6 by 1 double cylinder 20-harness 
dobby, one heavy 20-harness 4 by 4 boxes, one 20-harness and one 25-harness 
blanket, seven intermediate woolen 25-harness 4 by 4 boxes and two 90-inch 25- 
harness heavy woolen looms. 

The Jacquard loom section includes one Stafford silk loom, 1,200-hook, Halton 
head; one 400-hook, single-lift Schaum & Uhlinger Jacquard, mounted for 4-bank, 
narrow fabric loom; one Skinner Brussels carpet loom, three-quarters wide, equipped 
with 1,280-hook Jacquard head presented by the Bigelow-Hartford Carpet Com- 
pany, Clinton, Mass. The Crompton & Knowles Loom Works has furnished one 
Knowles fancy loom, single-lift Jacquard; one Knowles fancy loom, double-lift 
Jacquard; one Knowles fancy loom, Jacquard tied up for leno, one Knowles loom, 
4 by 4 boxes, 54-inch, with 600-hook, double-lift, double-cylinder McMurdo 
Jacquard head, tied up for damask napkin designs; one Crompton & Knowles 72- 
inch tapestry loom, with 2,600-hook Halton Jacquard head, one 840-hook, double- 
lift, single-cylinder Jacquard on Crompton & Knowles 4-bank ribbon loom, one 
800-hook, double-lift Knowles Gem silk brocade Jacquard machine, 4 by 4 boxes. 

The silk loom section includes one Stafford silk loom, 20-harness dobby, 2 by 1 
box motion, sliding bar warp stop motion, filling feeler, extended beam stands, 
motor drive; one Crompton & Knowles silk loom, 4 by 4 box motion, 20-harness 
head motion, individual motor drive. 

For the purpose of card cutting there has been furnished one Jacquard fine 
index card-cutting machine by John Royle & Sons, Paterson, N. J.; one Jacquard 
French index card-cutting machine by the same concern. 

Chemistry and Dyeing Department. — The Chemistry Laboratory consists 
of one to give instruction in General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis and 
provides facilities to take 120 students. The Quantitative Laboratory takes care 
of some 50 students and contains the necessary drying closet, steam bath, elec- 
trolytic table, with ample facilities to provide distilled water through the use of a 
Barnstead Water Still. The Balance Room, which is adjacent to the laboratory, 
has eleven analytical balances made by such concerns as Christian Becker, Eimer 
& Amend, and H. L. Becker’s Sons & Company. The Organic Laboratory has 
facilities to take care of approximately 25 students having the necessary equipment 
required in the preparation of basic organic compounds and instruments used in the 
manufacture of dyes such as autoclaves, electric and gas combustion furnaces. 

The Engineering Chemistry Laboratory contains the following equipment: a 
Becker chainomatic Westphal balance, a Stormer viscosimeter, a Doolittle visco- 
simeter, an Engler viscosimeter, Saybolt viscosimeters, Pensky-Martin flash 
tester, Cleveland open cup flash tester, Mahler oxygen bomb calorimeter, Emerson 
oxygen bomb calorimeters, Parr peroxide bomb calorimeter, Parr sulphur bomb, 
New York State closed testers, carbon residue apparatus, Orsat flue gas apparatus, 
Hempel gas analysis apparatus, and the usual chemical apparatus and analytical 
balances. 

The Chemical Textile Testing Laboratory contains the following: a Scott seri- 
graph strength tester, a Scott single strand strength tester, a Freas drying oven and 
Becker analytical balance for moisture determinations, a mercury arc lamp for 
ultra violet, a fadeometer, a launderometer, yarn reels, a twist counter, an extrac- 
tion apparatus, a centrifuge, a Scott regain indicator, a barometer, a Hygrodeik 
hygrometer, Sling psychrometers, a DuNuoy tensiometer, a Zeiss dipping refracto- 
meter, an Abb6 refractometer, a Gaertner spectroscope, a polariscope, a MacBeth 
color matching lamp, a Mackay cloth oil tester, a Duboscq colorimeter, a Lovibond 
tintometer, and the usual chemical apparatus and analytical balances. 

The Microscopy Laboratory has been equipped with the following: a polarizing 
chemical microscope, twelve ordinary microscopes, a Minot rotary microtome, a 
Spencer table microtome, a Zeiss comparison ocular, Chalet lamps, individual 
lamps, Silvermann illuminators, mechanical stages, dark ground illuminators, a 
vertical illuminator, a camera lucida, polarizing equipment, an arc lamp, stools, 
microscope tables, and the usual auxiliaries. 

The Photography and Photomicroscopy Laboratory equipment is as follows: 
Bausch and Lomb horizontal photomicrographic apparatus, Leitz vertical photo- 
micrographic apparatus, Lucas vertical photomicrographic apparatus, Wratten 
filters, Klieg lamps, dark-room lamps, a projection printer, a graphic camera with 
focal plane shutter; also much small apparatus such as tanks, trays, washers, etc. 


61 

The Chemical Museum has been provided with cases and representative dye- 
stuffs all furnished by various dyestuff manufacturers of this country and abroad. 
This offers an unparalleled opportunity for students to study and experiment with 
almost all of the representative dyes which are used in the textile industry. 

The Experimental Dyeing Laboratory is equipped with individual benches, 
small dyeing apparatus, reels, balances, apparatus for dye testing, such as frames 
for exposing dyed material to light, and a complete collection of dyestuff samples 
and sample cards. There are also fifty-six steam coil experimental dyeing baths, 
a drying chamber and ageing chamber, in addition to a Hurricane Dryer, Class D, 
made by the Philadelphia Drying Machinery Company, Pennsylvania. Adjacent 
to the Experimental Dyeing Laboratory there has been provided a well-lighted 
room for the storage of a great variety of dyestuffs. Steel shelving has been ar- 
ranged so that the samples are easy of access. All samples are catalogued in a 
card file, thus facilitating their use. 

The Industrial Chemistry Laboratory contains the following: one filter press, 
type E. T. Shriver & Company; a single-acting triplex plunger pump, Goulds 
Manufacturing Company; a vacuum drying apparatus, a surface condenser, a 
Packard vacuum pump, Norman Hubbard’s Sons; a vacuum evaporator, Swenson 
system, American Foundry and Machine Company; a centrifugal, C. H. Chavant 
& Company; a double jar mill, F. I. Stokes & Company. 

The Experimental Printing Laboratory is equipped with a power-driven, full- 
sized, two-roll calico printing machine, and a smaller one-roll, power-driven print- 
ing machine, both made by Rice, Barton & Fales, Worcester, Mass., a small hand- 
driven, laboratory printing machine, an iron- jacketed steaming chamber, and a 
set of steam- jacketed copper kettles. 

To give instruction in dyeing on a basis which is more comparable with com- 
mercial practice there is provided a laboratory which includes the following equip- 
ment: a small kier, fitted with E. D. Jefferson’s circulating device, a Permutit filter, 
the Permutit Company, New York City; a mercerizing machine, raw stock and 
yarn dyeing machines, Klauder-Weldon Dyeing Machine Company; a jig dyeing 
machine, the Textile-Finishing Machine Company, Providence, R. I.; a set of 
drying cans by the same concern; a chain dyeing machine, T. C. Entwistle Com- 
pany, Lowell, Mass. ; a raw stock drying table, Proctor & Schwartz, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; a padding mangle, Arlington Machine Works, Arlington, Mass.; a hydro- 
extractor, W. H. Tolhurst & Son, Troy, N. Y.; a Psarski experimental dyeing 
machine, a Hussong experimental dyeing machine, equipped for raw stock or 
yarns, a Rodney Hunt sample piece dyeing machine, equipped with an automatic 
temperature and pressure-regulating apparatus, made by C. J. Tagliabue Manu- 
facturing Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. The Franklin Process Company, Provi- 
dence, R. I., has furnished a 25-pound bronze dyeing machine. Of the various dye 
tubs, one is equipped with a Monel metal lining to withstand the action of various 
chemicals and dyes. 

Finishing Department. — The Woolen and Worsted section includes a motor- 
driven Clipper cloth 4-string washer, a fulling mill, and a combination fulling and 
washing mill for jersey fabrics, furnished by the Rodney Hunt Company, Orange, 
Mass. ; a sample fulling mill, a kicker mill, furnished by James Hunter & Company, 
North Adams, Mass. ; an up and down dry gig, a rolling and stretching machine, an 
up and down wet gig, a steam finishing machine, a 60-inch, 3-burner singeing 
machine, adapted for cotton, silk or worsted goods, a 2-cylinder double-acting 
brushing machine. Curtis & Marble Machine Company of Worcester has furnished 
a 60-inch 4-cylinder sanding and polishing machine; a mantle steaming and air- 
cooling machine, equipped with a direct connected motor and a Nash pump; a 
66^-inch motor driven, single woolen shear, equipped with list saving motion; 
a 6-4 double shear, an A. W.C. measuring and weighing machine, furnished by Parks 
& Woolson, Springfield, Vt.; a dewing machine, a 6-4 Voelker rotary press, fur- 
nished by G. W. Voelker & Co., Woonsocket, R. I.; a tentering and drying machine 
furnished by John Heathcote, Providence, R. I.; a single crabbing machine, H. W. 
Butterworth & Son, Philadelphia, Pa. ; a 72-inch woolen napper donated by Davis & 
Furber, North Andover, Mass.; a 32-inch basket hydro-extractor, W. H. Tolhurst, 
Troy, N. Y. ; a Lintz & Eckhardt cloth numbering machine, from Durbrow & Hearne 
Company, New York; a steam press for underwear, United States Hoffman Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y.; a sewing machine, Birch Brothers, Somerville, Mass.; a 


62 

trimming and overseaming machine, The Merro w Machine Company, Hartford, Conn. 

The Cotton section includes a 40-inch inspecting and brushing machine, a 
44-inch No. 25 railway sewing and rolling machine, a 44-inch cotton shearing 
machine, Type No. 34, a 44-inch No. 3 steam calender rolling machine, a 40-inch 
cloth folder, a 40-inch winder and measurer, a set of 44-inch shear blades for grinding 
purposes, furnished by Curtis & Marble Machine Company, Worcester, Mass.; 
a 48-inch No. 4 opening, sewing and rolling machine, a No. 1 hand power portable 
railway sewing machine, furnished by Dinsmore Manufacturing Company, Salem, 
Mass.; a 40-inch 4-tank open soaping machine equipped with patent flushing rolls, 
brass and rubber squeeze rolls and spiral openers, furnished by Birch Brothers, 
Somerville, Mass. ; an 84-inch 36-roll, ball bearing, double acting napper, equipped 
with a 7^-horsepower General Electric motor drive, furnished by Davis & Furber, 
North Andover, Mass, (the ball bearings were donated by the Fafnir Bearing Com- 
pany, New Britain, Conn.); an 8-inch belt lacer furnished by the Clipper Belt 
Lacer Company of Grand Rapids, Mich.; a 40-inch, 3-roll water mangle, with 
husk and brass rolls and usual attachments and equipped with a 48-inch Mycock 
scutcher, and a 40-inch Mycock cloth expander made by Thomas Leyland & Com- 
pany, Boston; a 40-inch, 2-roll starch mangle, a 40-inch upright drying machine 
with 10 copper cylinders equipped with Files dry can system, Files Engineering 
Company, Inc., Bridgeport, Conn.; a 40-inch sprinkler, a 40-inch, 5-roll Universal 
calender with chasing attachment and equipped with a 40-inch Mycock cloth 
expander, a pasting table with plate, furnished by the Textile-Finishing Machinery 
Company, Providence, R. I.; a 16 by 24 inch bronze-covered stretcher for the 
drying cans, C. A. Luther & Company, Providence, R. I.; a 40-inch double bristle 
stretcher for drying cans, American Finishing Machinery Company, Boston, Mass.; 
a trimming and overseaming machine, The Merrow Machine Company, Hartford, 
Conn.; a 40-inch Tommy Dodd starch mangle, and a 44-inch, 50-foot vibratory 
tentering machine, H. W. Butterworth & Sons Company, Philadelphia, Pa. This 
machine is directly driven by a 734“horsepower variable speed motor and is 
equipped with a Schwartz automatic electric guider, made by L. H. A. Schwartz 
& Company, Boston, Mass. 

Engineering Department. — The Steam Engineering Laboratory contains 
the following equipment arranged for experimental purposes: A 50-horsepower 
Allis-Chalmers Corliss steam engine direct connected to an Alder absorption 
dynamometer, and piped to exhaust its steam to the atmosphere, to a Wheeler 
surface condenser or to the Kerr turbine; a Kerr seven-stage turbine driving 
directly a 25-kilowatt Richmond Electric Company’s alternating current generator 
and piped to exhaust either to the atmosphere or the condenser. It may be operated 
either as high pressure or low pressure turbine, and the generator has special con- 
nections to illustrate various commercial phases. In addition there are a 4 by 6 
Deane triplex power pump, two 2-inch centrifugal pumps made by Lawrence 
Machine Company, Lawrence, Mass., a Clayton air compressor and necessary 
tanks, scales and measuring instruments. For the measurement of flow of air 
there are a steam-driven Sturtevant fan and a motor-driven Massachusetts fan 
with heater combined for heating and drying experiments. 

The Electrical Engineering Laboratory consists of two sections, one of which is 
devoted to instruction in the generation and transmission of power, and contains 
the necessary switchboard and instruments to control a 25-kilowatt alternating 
current turbo generator and a 15-kilowatt motor generator set arranged to supply 
either direct or alternating current. In addition there are a 24-horsepower direct 
current Allis-Chalmers motor and a 10-horsepower direct current General Electric 
motor, also a 10 and a 7.5 horsepower General Electric alternating current motor 
besides a General Electric 3-Kilowatt rotary transformer and three Westinghouse 
stationary transformers. The other section of the laboratory is. known as the 
instrument laboratory and is for the purpose of giving instruction in the measure- 
ment of current voltage, resistance, and in the calibration of instruments. It con- 
tains a 5-kilowatt Crocker- Wheeler balancer, a 160-ampere hour storage battery, 
a 5-kilowatt 220-volt to 440-volt General Electric transformer, a Westinghouse 
portable wattmeter with current and potential transformers, three wattmeters, two 
ammeters and a voltmeter, all of the General Electric portable alternating current 
type, a 30-volt alternating current Roller Smith voltmeter, a 5 to 10-scale Weston 
ammeter (electro-dynamometer type), a Weston millivoltmeter with 2, 20, 50 and 


63 

200 ampere shunts, three 250-volt direct current Weston voltmeters, a 150-ampere, 
two model 45, two model 260, Weston portable ammeters, a Weston model 260 
voltmeter, a Thompson 50-ampere recording wattmeter, a General Electric rotating 
standard wattmeter, two General Electric induction type watt hour meters, an 
Esterline portable curve drawing wattmeter, a 100-ampere Leeds & Northrup 
Standard Resistance, a Leeds & Northrup Ayrton shunt, a Weston laboratory 
standard voltmeter with 600-volt multiplier, a Leeds & Northrup potentiometer, 
a D'Arsonval wall type galvanometer, a WLeatstone bridge with galvanometer, 
a slide wire bridge and electro-dynamometer, Weston Standard cell, potential phase 
shifter, a standard Leeds & Northrup photometer with Lummer-Brodhun screen, 
and Macbeth illuminometer made by the same concern. 

Machine Shop. — The equipment of the machine shop is as follows: Four 
standard engine lathes, 13-inch swing, 6-foot bed, and an engine lathe, 18-inch 
swing, 10-foot bed; three standard engine lathes, 14-inch swing, 6-foot bed, from 
Flather & Company, Nashua, N. H.; a standard engine lathe, 15-inch swing, 6-foot 
bed, from F. E. Reed Company, Worcester, Mass.; an engine lathe, 18-inch swing, 
6-foot bed from Champion Tool Works, Cincinnati, Ohio; a standard engine 
lathe, 15-inch swing, 6-foot bed, from S. H. Putnam Sons, Fitchburg, Mass.; one 
No. 1 Universal milling machine, with all three feeds automatic, from Kempsmith 
Manufacturing Company, Milwaukee, Wis.; one 24 by 24 inch, 6-foot planer, 
from the Mark Flather Planer Company, Nashua, N. H.; one 23-inch upright drill, 
with back gears and power feed, from J. E. Snyder & Son, Worcester, Mass.; one 
14-inch single sensitive drill, from the Stanley Manufacturing Company, Lawrence, 
Mass.; one No. 1 Universal grinder, from Landis Tool Company, Waynesboro, Pa.; 
five speed lathes, 17-inch swing, 5-foot bed, one 20-inch wet tool grinder, and one 12- 
inch, 2-wheel dry grinder, from J. G. Blount, Everett, Mass.; an American twist drill 
grinder, from the Heald Machine Company, Worcester, Mass. ; one Type IB port- 
able electric grinder from the Cincinnati Electric Tool Company, Cincinnati, Ohio ; 
one 30-inch grindstone and frame, from the Athol Machine Company, Athol, 
Mass.; a single spindle centering machine, from D. E. Whiton Machine Company, 
New London, Conn.; one 15-inch shaper, from Potter & Johnson, Pawtucket, R. I.; 
one power hacksaw, from the Fairbanks Company, Boston, Mass.; one cold saw, 
from John T. Burr & Son, Brooklyn, N. Y.; one Eureka metal power saw, Manning, 
Maxwell & Moore; one Type CC electric drill, Cincinnati Electric Tool Company; 
one Universal milling attachment for Kempsmith milling machine, and one Hisey 
Type B J^-horsepower tool post grinder, Taylor Machinery Company; one No. 2 
Cory bench straightener, Manning, Maxwell & Moore; one No. 3 Universal cutter 
and reamer grinding machine, Browne & Sharpe; a well-equipped tool room con- 
taining a selected stock of the best makes of small tools, such as drills, taps and dies, 
milling cutters, reamers, gauges, micrometers, etc. 

Power, Light, Heat and Ventilating Plant. — In the powerhouse there is 
located the main power-generating apparatus for supplying light, heat and power 
to all departments of the Institute. The equipment here consists of: two 250- 
horsepower Heine water tube boilers, one equipped with a Jones stoker and one 
with Perfection grate, a 300-horsepower Aultman & Taylor horizontal water tube 
boiler, equipped with United States rocking grates, two boiler feed pumps — one a 
Knowles and the other a Deane — a 40,000-pound Cochrane metering open-feed 
heater, which is provided with a Lea recorder, and a Cochrane oil extractor which 
heats and measures all feed water, a 3-inch Venturi meter in feed line with indicating 
manometer as made by the Builders Iron Foundry, Providence, R. I . In the Engine 
Iloom are located : a Payne 14 by 14 automatic high speed engine, 125-horsepower 
direct connected to 75-kilowatt, 220-volt, direct-current Bullock generator; a 
9 % by 11 Nash gas engine of 50-horsepower, 4-cycle type, direct connected to a 
30-kilowatt, 220-volt, direct-current Bullock generator; a 65-kilowatt motor 
generator set, consisting of a direct current motor and an alternating current 
generator made by the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company; a 
steam-driven Ingersoll-Rand 8 by 8 air compressor, for use with Turbo heads, in- 
stalled in the French Spinning Department by the G. M. Parks Company, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. The station switchboard is of marine-finished slate, 90 inches in 
height, and consists of three generator panels and two circuit panels. 

The powerhouse is connected with the main school buildings by a tunnel through 
which all wires, steam and water pipes are carried. 


64 

GRADUATES WITH TITLES OF THESES 


June 5, 1934 

Bachelor op Textile Chemistry 

As thesis is now optional in the Department of Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, 
no thesis subjects have been listed. 

Grover Stanley Allen Haverhill, Mass. 

Edgar Raymond Beigbeder Roslindale, Mass. 

John Lincoln Birtwell East Chelmsford, Mass. 

Mitchell John Bukala Lowell, Mass. 

James Edward Burke, Jr Lowell, Mass. 

Charles Lincoln Daley Lowell, Mass. 

Francis Clifford Gillespie North Andover, Mass. 

Mitchell Glowienski Lowell, Mass. 

Robert Theodore Graham North Andover, Mass. 

Glen Mortimer Kidder Ayer, Mass. 

Raymond Lewis Matthews Gardner, Mass. 

Leon Eugene Moody Lowell, Mass. 

Roland Charles Morrison Dracut, Mass. 

Shantilal Hiralal Shah Bombay, India 

Harold Smith Lowell, Mass. 

Robert Joseph Thomas Lowell, Mass. 

William Joseph Wynn, Jr Lowell, Mass. 


Bachelor of Textile Engineering 

Edward Joseph Donohoe, Lowell, Mass. “The Actual Construction of and 
Tests with the Apparatus for the ‘Modified Box Test* for Waterproofness 
of Fabrics.” 

Parker Frank Dunlap, Lowell, Mass. “The Calibration of a Portable Instru- 
ment for Measuring Air Permeability of Fabrics.” Thesis with Robert C. 
Gregory. 

George Forsythe, Andover, Mass. “An Investigation of the Properties of Cot- 
ton Yarns Produced from Single and Double Roving by Regular and Long 
Drafts.” Thesis with Benjamin Thomas, Jr. 

David James Fox, Lowell, Mass. “The Effect of Regain on the Tensile Strength 
and Elongation of Viscose Rayon Yarns.” 

Alden Ives Gifford, Jr., Lowell, Mass. “A Study of the Effect of Weave on 
the Physical Properties of Cotton Fabrics.” 

Robert Crockett Gregory, Rockland, Me. Thesis with Parker F. Dunlap. 

Russell Munroe Lawson, Andover, Mass. “The Manufacture and Color 
Measurement of a Designer’s Blanket.” 

Gerald Alderic Leblanc, Lowell, Mass. “A Study of the Possibility of Using 
the Verigraph to Determine the Regain of Fabrics.” 

John Charles Lowe, Dracut, Mass. “An Investigation of the Effect of the 
Increase in the Weight of the End after it Leaves the Noble Comb on the 
Number of Operations Necessary to Produce Roving.” 

Simon Shapiro, Lowell, Mass. “A Study of the Relation Between the Plating of 
Knitting Yarn and the Twist in the Plating Yarn.” 

Benjamin Thomas, Jr., Nashua, N. H. Thesis with George Forsythe. 

Robert Campbell Wilkie, Newton Centre, Mass. “The Development of a 
Method for Determining the Moisture Content, Grease, Suint or Water 
Soluble, and Dirt and Vegetable Matter of Grease Wools.” 


Diploma in Cotton Manufacture 

William Edwin Stevens, West Warwick, R. I. “The Comparison of the Rela- 
tive Uniformity and Strength of Combed Yarns with Various Percentages of 
Noil Removed.” 

Diploma in Wool Manufacture 

Herbert Gardner Bridges, West Newbury, Mass. “The Duplication of a 
Worsted Suiting.” 

William Francis Huyck, Chelmsford, Mass. “The Manufacture of a Fancy 
Worsted.” 


65 

Prizes awarded in June, 1934 

The Medal of the National Association of Cotton Manufacturers awarded to the 
student taking course in Cotton who maintains the highest average in scholarship 
throughout this course. To David James Fox. 

Louis A. Olney Prizes (in the form of books). 

$10 to the student graduating from the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course, 
who, in the opinion of the instructing staff of the department, shall have main- 
tained the highest scholarship through the course. To Leon Eugene Moody . 

$10 to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course who 
shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship during his second 
year. To Herbert Alvin Wormwood. 

$5 to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile Coloring course who 
shall be considered as having attained the second highest scholarship during his 
second year. To Moushy Markarian . Honorable mention, Lee Gale Johnston and 
Bernard James Tyler. 

$10 to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile Coloring course 
who shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship in first-year 
Chemistry. To Hugh Francis Carroll. 

$5 to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile Coloring course who 
shall be considered as having attained the second highest scholarship in first-year 
Chemistry. To Robert Keith Lyle. Honorable mention, Richard Moushegian . 


66 


REGISTER OF DAY STUDENTS 


Candidates for Degree 


Class of 1935 

Home Address 

Alcott, Albert Stephen, Jr., IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Beattie, John Silas, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Bogdan, John Francis, VI, Nashua, N. H. 
Bradford, Edward Hosmer, VI, Andover, Mass. 
Connolly, Daniel Francis, Jr., VI, Salem, Mass. 
Cowan, Raymond Bernard, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 
Curtin, William John, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
deGruchy, James Campbell, Jr., IV, Stoneham, 
Mass. 

Dion, Ernest Lorenzo, IV, Lawrence, Mass. 
Echavarria, Luis, VI, Medellin, Colombia 
Eismann, Edmund, IV, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Fairbanks, Evan Hobbs, VI, Wakefield, Mass. 
Farkas, Zoltan Roland, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Freeman, Arthur Samuel, VI, Chelsea, Mass. 
Greenbaum, Hyman Herbert, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 
Griffin, Vernon Harcourt, IV, Swampscott, Mass. 
Grossman, Edward, VI, Providence, R. I. 

Harwood, Ralph, IV, Bronx, N. Y. 

Heffernan, John Vincent, IV, North Smithfield, 
R. I. 

Holden, Arthur Newton, VI, No. Billerica, Mass. 
Kopatch, Chester Marion, IV, Lawrence, Mass. 
Lauder, Robert William, VI, Haverhill, Mass. 
Leslie, Kenneth Everett, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 
Lokur, Swamirao Ramrao, IV, Ahmedabad, India 
Moreno, Emilio Gomez, Jr., VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Parechanian, James Humphrey, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Phelan, Leonard John, IV, Ipswich, Mass. 
Plovnick, Max David, IV, Roxbury, Mass. 
Poremba, Leo Louis, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Schoelzel, Herman Walter, IV, Methuen, Mass. 
Shain, Joseph, IV, Roxbury, Mass. 

Stein, William Joseph, VI, New Haven, Conn. 
Stolzberg, Howard Nathaniel, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 
Storey, Edwin Gerald, VI, Chatham, N. J. 
Thompson, George Robert, IV, Lowell, Mass. 


Lowell Address 
59 Canton Street 
285 Foster Street 


2 Mill Street, Collinsville 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
49 Second Street 


142 Riverside Street 
9 White Street 
Omicron Pi House 
32 Mt. Washington Street 


Omicron Pi House 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
142 Riverside Street 


53 Mt. Hope Street 
28 Loring Street 
1 Summer Court 
137 Riverside Street 
17 Mt. Vernon Street 
4 Oak Street 


17 Mt. Vernon Street 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
43 Plymouth Street 
39 Roper Street 


Class of 1936 

Anthony, Henry Steere, IV, Lowell, Mass. 20 Loring Street 

Basdikis, Charles Apostolos, IV, Lowell, Mass. 8 LaGrange Street 

Bates, Wesley Elliot, VI, East Milton, Mass. 

Boyd, William, Jr., IV, Providence, R. I. 52 Colonial Avenue 

Cobb, Joseph Calvin, VI, Dorchester, Mass. 

Cogswell, Frederick William, IV, Maynard, Mass. 

Conant, Gilman Wright, VI,. Newton ville, Mass. Omicron Pi House 

Crawford, Robert Thomas, VI, Boston, Mass. 

Fuller, Roland Monroe, VI, Lowell, Mass. R. F. D. No. 1 

Gagnon, Roland Octave, IV, Lowell, Mass. 279 Liberty Street 

Georgacoulis, George, IV, Lowell, Mass. 336 Suffolk Street 

Hodgman, Richard Albert, VI, Stoneham, Mass. 

Holgate, Benjamin Alexander, VI, Lowell, Mass. 97 Grove Street 
Ireland, Wilson Gerard, VI, Melrose, Mass. Omicron Pi House 


67 


Home Address 

Johnston, Lee Gale, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Kaiser, Raymond John, VI, Bloomfield, N. J. 
Landau, David, IV, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lee, Shao-fong, VI, Shanghai, China 
Lincoln, Charles Ernest, IV, Mattapan, Mass. 
McQuade, Allan John, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Markarian, Moushy, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Olshinski, Matthew John, VI, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Redmond, James Reynolds, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Roarke, John James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Schaller, Joseph Gregory, IV, Wellesley, Mass. 
Shah, Kantilal Hiralal, VI, Bombay, India 
Smith, William Arthur, Jr., VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Sullivan, Joseph Augustus, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Thompson, Henry Albert, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Tyler, Bernard James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Urbanetti, Anthony Joseph, IV, South Manches- 
ter, Conn. 

Valentine, Preston Sumner, IV, Cochituate, Mass. 
Welch, William Paul, Jr., IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Wormwood, Herbert Alvin, IV, North Wilmington, 
Mass. 


Lowell Address 


Omicron Pi House 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
53 Mt. Hope Street 


600 Andover Street 
103 Lawrence Street 


84 Bartlett Street 

75 Viola Street 
11 White Street 

53 Mt. Hope Street 
14 Mt. Washington St. No. 3 
28 Grove Street 
R. F. D. No. 1 
30 Epping Street 
65 Sterling Street 

53 Mt. Hope Street 

76 South Highland Street 


Class of 1937 


Allard, Frederick Pratt, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Bassett, Louis Loss, VI, New Haven, Conn. 

Berg, Abraham Da via, VI, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Boordetsky, Sidney Morris, VI, Cambridge, Mass. 
Carroll, Hugh Francis, IV, Medford, Mass. 
Churchill, Harry Coburn, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Clarke, John Thomas, VI, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Cutrumbes, Demosthenes John, IV, Dracut, Mass. 
Daly, William James, VI, Andover, Mass. 

Depoian, Vasken John, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Dupee, George Richardson, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Fisher, Thomas Nathan, VT, Lowell, Mass. 
Hadley, George Clarence, Jr., B.S. in A.E., VI, 
North Adams, Mass. 

Hakanson, Gustave Warren, IV, Winchester, Mass. 
Kahn, Seymour James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Kennedy, Robert Gilman, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Kimball, Harlan LeDoit, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

LeBel, Claude Merwin, VT, New York, N. Y. 
Lemkin, Uriel William, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Luescher, Frank Oscar, IV, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Lyle, Robert Keith, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Megas, Charles, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Moushegian, Richard, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Natsios, Basil Andrew, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Nerney, Francis Xavier, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Olcott, Harry Depew, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Reed, Harold Ernest, VT, Nashua, N. H. 

Regan, Paul William, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Robbins, Lucy Wiley, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Rosenberg, Jacob, VT, Westerly, R. I. 

Spanos, James Peter, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Stanley, Donald Edward, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Vaniotis, Socrates Vasilios, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Wagner, George Frederic, Jr., VT, Lowell, Mass. 


104 Eleventh Street 
17 Mt. Vernon Street 
17 Mt. Vernon Street 


214 Third Street 


8 Gates Street 
213 Branch Street 
100 Sanders Avenue 
Omicron Pi House 


714 Gorham Street 
223 Pine Street 
119 Sherman Street 
2 Mill Street, Collinsville 
24 D Street 
9 White Street 
86 Orleans Street 
114 Rock Street 
400 Central Street 
98 Lewis Street 
46 Dana Street 
56 Montview Avenue 


16 Linden Street 
102 South Loring Street 
37 Hanover Street 
14 West Bowers Street 
706 Stevens Street 
13 Willie Street 
42 Marlboro Street 


68 




Home Address Lowell Address 

Wilkinson, Herbert William, Jr., IV, Edgewood, Omicron Pi House 
R.I. 

Wright, George Ward, Jr., IV, Newtonville, Mass. Omicron Pi House 


Glass of 1938 

Broadhurst, Russell Denton, IV, Middletown, 
Conn. 

Buckley, Herman Timothy, IV, East Chelmford, 
Mass. 

Cherr, Alda Jay, IV, New York, N. Y. 

Comstock, Tom, VI, Great Barrington, Mass. 

Copp, Sewall Edward, VI, Brockton, Mass. 
Cordeau, Raymond Wilfred, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Dori, Anita Marie, VI, Chester, Mass. 

Fine, Milton Arnold, VI, Brighton, Mass. 

Fox, Kenneth Russell, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Freedman, David, VI, Boston, Mass. 

Fyfe, Robert Clark, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Garcia, Lorenzo Montero, VI, Mexico D. F., 
Mexico 

Getchell, Nelson Fletcher, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Grossman, Clinton, IV, Providence, R. I. 

Hardy, Thomas Wadsworth, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Harpoot, Burgess Charles, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Hatch, Robert Clinton, VI, Shirley, Mass. - 
Hobson, Charles Foster, Jr., IV, Lowell, Mass. 
HoLem, Charlie, VI, Calgary, Alberta 
Howard, Winfield Hersey, IV, North Chelmsford, 
Mass. 

Janes, Harold Earle, IV, Haverhill, Mass. 

Kaplan, Samuel Gilbert, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Kaplan, Sidney Stuart, VI, New York, N. Y. 
Ivelakos, Charles George, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Kelly, Warren Thomas, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Kiszka, Boleslaw Kazimierz, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Klosowicz, Edward Joseph, VI, Lowell, Mass. 
Knight, Richard Greene Howland, Jr., VI, Fall 
River, Mass. 

Kostrzewa, Stephen Peter, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Lemieux, Robert Alphonse, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Littlefield, Carl Richard, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Lutz, Helmuth Erich, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Lyons, James Francis, Jr., IV, Nashua, N. H. 
McMahon, Martin Edward, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Mahoney, Joseph Healey, IV, Andover, Mass. 
Murphy, Hubert James, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Oliver, Roger Barton, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Olsen, Earl Edward, VI, Reading, Mass. 

Page, Herbert Stanton, IV, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Paige, Walter Hale, Jr., New Bedford, Mass. 
Ploubides, John Peter, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Qualey, Francis Joseph, IV, Lowell, Mass. 
Ritchie, Newell Baird, IV, Concord, N. H. 
Rosenstein, Leo David, VI, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Shapiro, Sidney, VI, Lowell, Mass. 

Sheehan, Leo James, IV, Dracut, Mass. . 

Sood, George David, IV, Woonsocket, R.I. 
Thomas, Fred, VT, Holden, Mass. 

Tobin, Robert Thomas, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

White, William Sayles, VI, Lowell, Mass. 




50 Standish Street 


125 Mt. Washington Street 
137 Riverside Street 
49 Salem Street, Haverhill 
1014 Lake view Avenue 
63 Varnum Avenue 


359 Beacon Street 
17 Mt. Vernon Street 
148 Riverside Street 
9 White Street 

75 Pine Street 
Sigma Omega Psi House 
30 Chauncey Avenue 
185 Liberty Street 


115 Butman Road 
156 Methuen Street 


472 Wilder Street 
43 Plymouth Street 
47 Lagrange Street 
41 E Street 
211 Lakeview Avenue 
40 Read Street 

43 Plymouth Street 
7 Roosevelt Place 
56 Third Avenue 
69 Warwick Street 
7 Houghton Street 


43 London Street 


999 Princeton Street 
62 Glenwood Street 


137 Riverside Street 
59 Varney Street 
126 London Street 


Sigma Omega Psi House 
29 Daly Street 


115 Mt. Vernon Street 
65 Sterling Street 
49 School Street 
29 Monadnock Avenue 


69 


Diploma Students 

Class of 1935 

Home Address 

Boynton, Bradford Lewis, II, Andover, Mass. 
Jessen, Robert Frederick, I, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Shann, William Edwin, II, Putnam, Conn. 

Class of 1936 

Dursin, Louis Jules, II, Woonsocket, R. I. 
Elliott, Charles Henry, I, Leicester, Mass. 
Gould, Charles Edwin, II, Portland, Me. 
Stokes, Alfred Roscoe, II, Rumford, R. I . 


Lowell Address 


Omicron Pi House 
52 Colonial Avenue 


793 Merrimack Street 
Omicron Pi House 
52 Colonial Avenue 
11 White Street 


Wilson, Raymond. Bachmann, 11, Pawtucket, R. I. 146 Parkview Avenue 


Class of 1937 

Bresler, Francis Woodrow, III, Bridgeport, Conn. Sigma Omega Psi House 
Fleming, John Harvey, II, Sanford, Me. 156 Methuen Street 

Pease, Kilburn Gray, I, Greenville, N. H. 156 Methuen Street 


Special Students 

Athanasopoulos, Louis Peter, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Barrows, Raymond Reed, A.B., LL.B., I, Brookline, 
Mass. 

Baranowski, John, III, Lowell, Mass. 

Bliss, Dorothy Myrtle, III, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Bogacz, John, III, Lowell, Mass. 

Cwiklik, John Edward, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Dalphond, Alphonse, III, Dracut, Mass. 

Davis, Clayton Winslow, III, Dunstable, Mass. 
Dick, Kenneth Paul, IV, Lowell, Mass. 

Dion, George Walter, I, Salem, Mass. 
Doukszewicz, Joseph Francis, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Dunn, Austin Pember, VI, Shirley, Mass. 

Harmon, Lucien Johnstone, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Hirsch, Emanuel Herman, VI, Weehawken, N. J. 
Hofmann, Paul Louis, III, Lawrence, Mass. 
Johnson, Richard, I, Salem, Mass.. 

Leonard, William Wheeler, Jr., IV, Norwich, 
Conn. 

LeVeen, Edward Phillip, Jr., II, Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Liebmann, Herman, I, New York, N. Y. 

Olney, Richard Holden, B.S., III, Lowell, Mass. 
Raymond, Gardner Lawrence, III, Bedford, Mass. 
Reed, Grace Corbett, B.A., III, Reading, Mass. 
Rogers, Harry David, II, Oak Park, 111. 

Salpas, Cosmos George, III, Lowell, Mass. 
Scharschmidt, Eugene Herman, III, Providence, 
R. 1. 

Shaw, Charles Russell, IV, Methuen, Mass. 
Stevens, Dexter, Jr., VI, Warwick Neck, R. I. 
Wasiuk, Joseph, III, Madison, Me. 

White, Walter William, III, Haverhill, Mass. 


108 Adams Street 


4 Joiners Court 


53 Melrose Avenue 
84 Common Street 


22 Wetherbee Avenue 


52 Whipple Street 


145 Winthrop Avenue 
43 Plymouth Street 


Omicron Pi House 
Hotel Marlborough 
43 Plymouth Street 
118 Riverside Street 


Omicron Pi House 
232 Adams Street 

137 Riverside Street 


123 Riverside Street 
226 Riverside Street 


70 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF GRADUATES 

The following list has been corrected in accordance with information received 
previous to February 1, 1935. Any information regarding incorrect or missing 
addresses is earnestly soli cited. 

B.T.C. indicates the degree of Bachelor of Textile Chemistry; B.T.D. indicates 
the degree of Bachelor of Textile Dyeing; B.T.E. indicates the degree of Bachelor 
of Textile Engineering; D indicates a diploma; C indicates a certificate (covering 
a partial course only). Degrees were issued beginning with the year 1913. 

Abbot, Edward Moseley, II, ’04 (D). Manufacturer, Abbot Worsted Company, 
Graniteville, Mass. 

Abbott, George Richard, II, ’08 (D). Andover, Mass. 

Adams, Floyd Willington, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). 

Adams, Henry Shaw, I, ’05 (D). Assistant Treasurer, The Springs Cotton 
Mills, Chester, S. C. 

Adams, Tracy Addison, IV, ’ll (D). Vice-President and General Manager, 
Arnold Print Works, North Adams, Mass. 

Albrecht, Charles Henry, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Atlantic Mills, Prov- 
idence, R. I. 

Allard, Edward Joseph, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.)* Chemist, National Aniline & Chemical 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Allen, Grover Stanley, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Chemist, The Gardiner Hall, Jr., 
Company, South Willington, Conn. 

Almquist, George John Edwin, I, ’19 (D). Second Vice-President, Passaic- 
Bergen Lumber Company, Passaic, N. J. 

Anderson, Arthur Illman, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Associate, Department of Re- 
search, Laundryowners National Association, Joliet, 111. 

Anderson, Arthur Julius, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). Salesman, National Aniline and 
Chemical Company, 40 Rector Street, New York City 
Anderson, Clarence Alfred, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.) . Cost Department, Manville- 
Jenckes Company, Manville, R. I. 

Anderson, Harold Robert, II, ’26 (D). Research and Time Study Department, 
Abbot Worsted Company, Forge Village, Mass. 

Annan, David, II, ’23 (D). 105 Almont Street, Winthrop, Mass. 

Arienti, Peter Joseph, IV, ’10 (D). Chief Chemist and Dyer, Sayles Finishing 
Plants, Inc., Saylesville, R. I. 

Arundale, Henry Barnes, II, ’07 (D). Textile Analyst for G. H. Heath & Co., 
Ltd., Macclesfield, England, Andover, Mass. 

Atwood, Henry Jones, II, ’23 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Daniels Manufac- 
turing Company, East Brookfield, Mass. 

Babb, Charles Wilkes, Jr., II, ’31 (D). With Knox Woolen Company, Camden, 
Maine. 

Babigan, Edward, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 121 Bellevue Street, Lowell, Mass. 
Babigan, Raymond, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Associate Examiner, United States 
Patent Office, Washington, D. C. 

Bachelder, Charles Edward, IV, *24 (B.T.C.) Superintendent of Acetate Yarn 
Division, Tennessee Eastman Corporation, Kingsport, Tenn. 

Bagshaw, Herbert Arthur Edward, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). With Wannalancit Tex- 
tile Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Bailey, Joseph W., I, ’99 (D). Agent, Booth Manufacturing Company, New 
.Bedford IVlass 

Bailey, Lester Harold, IV r ’24 (B.T.C.). Chemist, United States Finishing 
Company, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Bailey, Walter James, IV, ’ll (D). Bailey’s Cleansers and Dyers, Watertown, 

Mass. 

Baker, Franz Evron, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Cotton Yarn Department, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Baker, Maurice Sidney, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Merchant, Baker’s Dress Goods 
Shop, Norwood, Mass. 


I 71 

Baker, William John, IV, ’16 (D). Supervisor, DuPont Rayon Company, Old 
Hickory, Tenn. 

Baker, William Samuel, I, ’26 (D). Assistant Systemizer, Nashua Manufactur- 
ing Company, Nashua, N. H. 

Balch, Ralph Herman, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). With Celanese Corporation of Amer- 
ica, Amcelle, Md. 

Baldwin, Frederick Albert, II, *04 (D). Vice-President and Secretary, Walter 
Blue & Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Bard, Morry Arnold, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Silver Line Dye Works, Inc., 
New York City. 

Barlofsky, Archie, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). Lawyer, Barlofsky & Barlofsky, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Barr, I. Walwin, I, *00 (D). Second Vice-President, Buckley Brothers Company, 
881 Broadway, New York City. 

Barrett, Andrew Edward, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Field Engineer, Armour & Co. 
(Industrial Soap Division), North Bergen, N. J. 

Barry, Leo Joseph, II, ’27 (D). With Bell Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Barry, Marie Gertrude, IV, ’32 (B f T.C.). Chemist, Hub Hosiery Company, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Bauer, Harold Conrad, III, ’28 (D). With Henry Bauer, Lawrence, Mass. 

Beck, Frederic Christian, II, ’24 (D). In business, Weld & Beck, Southbridge, 
Mass. 

Beeman, Earl Royal, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Pacific Mills, Dover, 
N. H. 

Beigbeder, Edgar Raymond, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Assistant Colorist, National 
Aniline Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bell, Edward Benjamin, IV, ’24(B.T.C.). With Calgon, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bennett, E. Howard, II, ’03 (C). Publisher, Frank P. Bennett & Co., 530 
Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Bentley, Byron, II, *26 (D). With Joseph Bentley Hair Company, Methuen, 

Mass 

Bergeron, Alvin Wilfred, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Celanese Corpora- 
tion of America, Amcelle, Md. 

Berry, Wilbur French, II, ’17 (D). 

Bertrand, Arthur Leon, IV, *32 (B.T.C.). Dyeing Department, United States 
Bunting Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Bienstock, George Jerrard, III, ’24 (D). Styler, Yorkshire Worsted Mills, 
New York, N. Y. 

Billings, Borden Dickinson, I, ’29 (D). Overseer of Dry Finishing, Glenark 
Mill, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Bird, Clarence Henry, II, *22 (D). Superintendent, George E. Duffy Manufac- 
turing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Bird, Francis John, VI, *22 (B.T.E.). 30 West Street, Attleboro, Mass. 

Birtwell, John Lincoln, IV, *34 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Armour & Co., North 
Bergen, N. J. 

Blaikie, Howard Mills, II, *11 (D). Salesman, Electrolux, Inc., Maywood, N. J. 

Blake, Parker Gould, VI, *14 (D). District Manager, Claude Denis & Co., Ltd., 
Toronto, Ont. 

Blanchard, John Lawrence, II, *23 (D). Designer, Farnsworth Company, 
Lisbon Centre, Me. 

Bodwell, Henry Albert, II, *00 (D). With Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, 
80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Booth, James Mooney, IV, *24 (B.T.C.). Salesman, The Huron Milling Com- 
pany, Inc., 9 Park Place, New York City. 

Bottomley, John, III, *28 (D). Assistant Designer, Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Brackett, Martin Richard, II, *22 (D). Selling Agent, 450 7th Avenue, New 
York City. 

Bradford, Harold Palmer, II, ’25 (D). 90 Beach Street, Malden, Mass. 

Bradford, Roy Hosmer, II, ’06 (D). Selling Agent, Textile Machinery, 161 
Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

Bradford, William Swan ton, VI, *31 (B.T.E.). Assistant Superintendent, Dress 
Goods Division, Lawrence Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 


72 

Bradley, Raymond Frost, VI, ’14 (D). Garage Proprietor, Twin Light Garage, 
267 East Main Street, Gloucester, Mass. 

Bradley, Richard Henry, V, ’01 (C). Gasoline Salesman, Fairhaven, Mass. 

Brainerd, Arthur Travena, IV, ’09 (D). Manager, Ciba Company, 325 West 
Huron Street, Chicago, 111. 

Brainerd, Carl Emil, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Superintendent of Dyeing, F. C. Huyck 
& Sons, Albany, N. Y. 

Brandt, Carl Dewey, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Head of Textile Engineering Depart- 
ment, Texas Technological College, Lubbock, Texas. 

Brannen, Leon Vincent, III, ’07 (C). 

Brickett, Chauncy Jackson, II, ’00 (D). Director, School of Textile Manufac- 
turing and Designing, International Correspondence School, Scranton, Pa. 

Brickett, Raymond Calvin, II, ’14 (D). Overseer, M. T. Stevens & Sons Com- 
pany (Marland Mills), Andover, Mass. 

Bridges, Herbert Gardner, II, ’34 (D). Hill Road, West Newbury, Mass. 

Brigham, Howard Mason, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Wellington, Sears & 
Co., 65 Worth Street, New York City. 

Bronson, Howard Seymour, II, ’27 (D). Overseer of Knitting, Portage Hosiery 
Company, Portage, Wis. 

Brosnan, William Francis, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Superintendent of Dyeing, 
Bradford Dyeing Association, Bradford, R. I. 

Brown, Gerald Marston, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). With Monomac Spinning Company, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Brown, Philip Franklin, II, ’23 (D). Manager, Special Products Section, 
DuPont Rayon Company, 350 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Brown, Rollins Goldthwaite, IV, ’12 (D). 

Brown, Russell Lee, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Assistant Professor, Department of 
Woolen Yarns, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Brown, Will George, Jr., IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Hide & Leather 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Buchan, Donald Cameron, II, ’01 (D). Assistant Superintendent, M. T. 
Stevens & Sons Company, North Andover, Mass. 

Buchan, Norman Spaulding, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Newmarket 
Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Bukala, Mitchell John, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). With Massachusetts Mohair Plush 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Burbeck, Dorothy Maria, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). See Garlick, Mrs. Dorothy M. 

Burger, Samuel Joseph, III, ’24 (D). President, Heat Maintenance Service, 
Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Burke, James Edward, Jr., IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). 77 Durant Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Burnham, Frank Erwin, IV, ’02 (D). Chemist and Dyer, Henry Klous Com- 
pany, Lawrence, Mass. 

Burns, Robert, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Celanese Corporation of America, 
Amcelle, Md. 

Burtt, Joseph Frederic, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). With Abbot Worsted Company, 
Forge Village, Mass. 

Buzzell, Harry Saville, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Color Technician, Oxford Paper 
Company, Rumford, Maine. 

Callahan, John Joseph, Jr., II, ’26 (D). Color Chemist, Technicolor Motion 
Picture Corporation, Boston, Mass. 

Cameron, Elliott Francis, IV, ’ll (D). Attorney-at-law, Willard, Allen and 
Mulkern, 100 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

Campbell, Alexander, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Assistant Chief Engineer, Quincy 
Market Cold Storage & Warehouse Company, Boston, Mass. 

Campbell, Allan, Jr., VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). 601 East Eighth Street, South Boston, 
Mass. 

Campbell, Louise Porter, Illb, ’03 (C). With Ginn & Co., 15 Ashburton Place, 
Boston, Mass. 

Campbell, Orison Sargent, II, ’03 (D). Manager, Industrial Felts, Ltd., 
Kitchener, Ont. 


73 

Cannell, Philip Stuart, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Hotel Manager, Carlton Hotel, 
Malden, Mass. 

Carbone, Alfred John, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Sandoz Chemical 
Works, 36 Purchase Street, Boston, Mass. 

Carleton, Joseph Raddin, III, ’30 (D). Assistant Designer, The Bridgeport 
Coach Lace Company, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Carr, George Everett, I, ’05 (D). Industrial Engineer, C. F. Mueller Company, 
180 Baldwin Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 

Carr, Paul Edward, II, ’24 (D). Designer, Cascade Woolen Mills, Oakland, Me. 

Carter, Robert Albion, IV, ’02 (D). District Sales Manager, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Carter, Russell Albert, II, ’25 (D). Textile Engineer, Hampton Company, 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Cary, Julian Clinton, VI, ’10 (D). Branch Manager, The American Mutual 
Liability Insurance Company, 12 Haynes Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Casey, Francis Harold, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Hodges Finishing Company, 
East Dedham, Mass. 

Caya, Ferdinand Joseph, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Gotham Silk 
Hosiery Company, Inc., Wharton N. J. 

Chamberlin, Frederick Ellery, I, ’03 (D). Overseer of Spinning, Monument 
Mills, Housatonic, Mass. 

Chandler, Proctor, IV, ’ll (D). Manager, Barbour Mills, Montello, Mass. 

Chang, Chi, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Chang, Wen Chuan, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Dah Sung Cotton Spinning & Weaving 
Co., 392 Nanking Road, Shanghai, China. 

Chapman, Leland Hildreth, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Pepperell, Mass. 

Chen, Shih Ching, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.)* Shanghai, China. 

Chen, Wen-Pei, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Shanghai Bureau of Inspection, Shanghai, 
China. 

Chisholm, Lester Bury, I, ’ll (D). Textile Development, U. S. Rubber Com- 
pany, Providence, R. I. 

Church, Charles Royal, II, ’06 (C). Instructor, San Diego High School, 
San Diego, Calif. 

Churchill, Charles Whittier, III, ’06 (D). Manager, Churchill Manufacturing 
Company, Inc., Lowell, Mass. 

Clark, Earl William, IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). Salem Depot, N. H. 

Clark, Thomas Talbot, II, ’10 (D). President and Treasurer, Talbot Mills, 
North Billerica, Mass. 

Clarke, George Dean, II, ’21 (C). Dyer, Seamans & Cobb Thread Mills, Hop- 
kinton, Mass. 

Clayton, Harold Edmund, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Manager, Clayton Hosiery Mill, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Cleary, Charles Joseph, II, ’13 (D). Textile Technologist, United States Army 
Air Corps, Dayton, Ohio. 

Clement, David Scott, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Nashua Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Nashua, N. H. 

Cleveland, Richard Sumner, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Research, National 
Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C. 

Clifford, Albert Chester, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Western Electric 
Company, Inc., Kearny, N. J. 

Clogston, Raymond B., IV, ’04 (D). Merrimack Manufacturing Company, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Cluett, John Girvin, I, ’29 (D). Assistant to Bleachery Superintendent, Cluett, 
Peabody & Co., Inc., Waterford, N. Y. 

Coan, Charles Bisbee, IV, ’12 (D). Salesman and Demonstrator, American 
Aniline Products Company, Boston, Mass. 

Coffey, Daniel Joseph, III, ’28 (D). Quality Man on Blankets, F. C. Huyck 
& Sons, Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Cohen, Arthur Edward, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). 

Cohen, Raphael Edvab, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Sales Manager, Merrimack Paper 
Tube Company, Inc., Lowell, Mass. 


74 

Colby, J. Tracy, VI, ’16 (D). Sales Manager, F. C. Huyck & Sons, Empire State 
Building, Room 3006, New York City. 

Colby, Willard Alvah, Jr., IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Assistant Superintendent, Hoho- 
kus Bleachery, Hohokus, N. J. 

Cole, Edward Earle, IV, ’06 (D). Financial Agent, The Bradstreet Company, 
Boston, Mass. 

Cole, James Thomas, II, ’05 (D). 1357 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, Mass. 

Collonan, Herbert Joseph, II, ’22 (D). College Weavers, Inc., Northampton, 

Mass. 

Coman, James Groesbeck, I, ’07 (D). Manager, Mexia Textile Mills, Mexia, 
Texas. 

Conant, Harold Wright, I, ’09 (D). Assistant Treasurer, United Elastic Cor- 
poration, Easthampton, Mass. 

Conant, Richard Goldsmith, I, ’12 (D). Sales Executive, Wellington, Sears & 
Co., 65 Worth Street, New York City. 

Conklin, Jennie Grace, Illb, ’05 (C). See Nostrand, Mrs. William L. 

Connor, Thomas Francis, II, ’28 (D). North Cohasset, Mass. 

Connorton, John Joseph, Jr., Ill, ’27 (D). Designer, Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Cook, Kenneth Bartlett, I, ’13 (D). Manager of Technical and Development 
Department, Manville-Jenckes Company, Manville, R. I. 

Corbett, James Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Calco Chemical Company, 
Bound Brook, N. J. 

Cote, Theodore Charles, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Merrimack Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Craig, Albert Wood, IV, ’07 (D). Superintendent, Windsor Print Works, North 
Adams, Mass. 

Craig, Clarence Eugene, III, ’02 (D). 

Crane, Eugene Francis, II, ’33 (D). 517 Westford Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Creese, Guy Talbot, IV, ’14 (D). Leather Manufacturer, Creese & Cook Com- 
pany, Danver sport, Mass. 

Crowe, Joseph Bailey, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Textile Research, Chemical Division, 
Procter & Gamble Co., Ivorydale, Ohio. 

Culver, Ralph Farnsworth, IV, ’04 (D). Vice-President and Manager, Provi- 
dence Office, Ciba Company, Inc., 61 Peck Street, Providence, R. I. 

Cummings, Edward Stanton, VI, ’16 (D). Industrial Engineer, with Ralph E. 
Loper & Co., Greenville, S. C. 

Curran, Charles Ernest, III, ’02 (C). Head Designer, Wood Worsted Mills, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Currier, Herbert Augustus, I, ’06 (D). Vice-President, Waterman, Currier & 
Co., Inc., 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Currier, John Alva, II, ’01 (D). Superintendent of Fabrics Department, M. T. 
Stevens & Sons Co., North Andover, Mass. 

Curtis, Frank Mitchell, I, ’06 (D). Retail Lumber, Wm. Curtis Sons Company, 
10 Blue Hill Parkway, Milton, Mass. 

Curtis, William Leavitt, II, ’05 (C). 

Cutler, Benjamin Winthrop, Jr., Ill, ’04 (D). Department Manager, Worth 
Textile Company, 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Cuttle, James H., II, ’99 (D). Vice-President and General Manager, S. Stroock 
& Co., Inc., Newburgh, N. Y. 

Daley, Charles Lincoln, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). 239 Stevens Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Dalton, Gregory Smith, IV, ’12 (D). 

Danahy, Arthur Joseph, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Dyestuff Chemist, Ciba Company, 
Inc., 325 West Huron Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Darby, Avard Nelson, II, ’28 (D). General Foreman, Plant No. 2, Merrimac 
Hat Corporation, Amesbury, Mass. 

Datar, Anant Vithal, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Manager, The Chalisgaon Shri Laxmi 
Narayan Mills Co., Ltd., Chalisgaon, E.K., India. 

Davidson, Sydney, III ’28 (D). 

Davieau, Alfred Edward, VI, ’16 (D). Chief of Textile Section, United States 
Testing Company, 1415 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. 


75 

Davieau, Arthur Napoleon, VI, ’13 (D). Superintendent, Kenwood Mills, 
Ltd., (F. C. Huyck & Sons), Arnprior, Ont. 

Davieau, Leon Arthur, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). With United States Rubber Company, 
Market and South Streets, Passaic, N. J. 

Davis, Alexander Duncan, VI, ’14 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Northeastern Uni- 
versity, Springfield, Mass. 

Dearborn, Roy S., VI, ’13 (D). With Real Estate Department, Andover Sav- 
ings Bank, Andover, Mass. 

Dearth, Elmer Elbridge, IV, ’12 (D). Factory Manager, Mansfield Tire & 
Rubber Co., Mansfield, Ohio. 

Del Plaine, Parker Haywood, IV, ’25 (B. T. C.). Southern Manager, Rohm & 
Hass Company, Inc., 1109 Independent Building, Charlotte, N. C. 

Dempsey, Phillip Edward, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Aniline 
Products Company, Inc., New York City. 

Derby, Roland Everett, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Chemist, M. T. Stevens & Sons 
Company, North Andover, Mass. 

de Sa, Francisco, VI, ’18 (B.T.E.). Avenue da Graca, Bahia, Brazil. 

Dewey, James French, II, ’04 (D). President, A. G. Dewey Company, Quechee, 
Vt. 

Dewey, Maurice William, II, ’ll (D). Montpelier, Vt. 

Dillon, James Henry, III, ’05 (D). 

Dods, James Barber, II, ’27 (D). Vice-President and General Manager, The 
Dods Knitting Company, Ltd., Orangeville, Ont. 

Dolan, William Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Lowell Bleachery South, 
Griffin, Ga. 

Donald, Albert Edward, II, ’04 (D). Agent, H. T. Hayward Company, Frank- 
lin, Mass. 

Donohoe, Edward Joseph, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, United States 
Testing Company, Inc., Hoboken, N. J. 

Donovan, Joseph Richard, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Technical Supervisor, Laundry 
Division, The Warren Soap Manufacturing Company, Inc., Cambridge, 
Mass., and Massachusetts Laundry School, Boston, Mass. 

Doran, Wilbur Kirkland, II ’22 (D). 

Dorr, Clinton Lamont, VI, ’14 (D). General Manager, Raymond’s, Inc., 356 
Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

Douglas, Walter Shelton, II, ’21 (D). Estimator, Douglas & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Dudley, Albert Richard, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). With Nashua Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Lowell, Mass. 

Duggan, Paul Curran, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Gotham Silk Hosiery 
Company, 580 First Avenue, New York City. 

Duguid, Harry Wyatt, I, ’24 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Maverick Mills, 
East Boston, Mass. 

Dunlap, Kirke Harold, Jr., VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Kenwood Mills, 
Ltd., Arnprior, Ont. 

Dunlap, Parker Frank, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). With Newmarket Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Dunnican, Edward Tunis, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Instructor in Textile Work, 
Passaic Public Schools, Passaic. N. J. 

Durgin, William Ernest, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist and Colorist, 
Geigy Company, Inc., 88 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

Duval, Joseph Edward, II, ’10 (D). Yarn Agent, 3701 North Broad Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dwight, John Francis, Jr., II, ’08 (D). Hazel Avenue, Scituate, Mass. 

Echecopar, Jesus Fortunato, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). Director-Gerente, Sociedad 
Agricola Tejada Ltda., Lima, Peru. 

Echmalian, John Gregory, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). Director, State Trade School, 
South Manchester, Conn. 

Ehrenfried, Jacob Benjamin, II, ’07 (C). Manager, George Ehrenfried Com- 
pany, Lewiston, Maine. 

Elliott, Gordon Baylies, II, ’12 (D). Planning Department, Pacific Mills, 
Lawrence, Mass. 


76 

Ellis, Charles Albert, VI, *21 (B.T.E.). 901 Danforth Street, Syracuse N. Y. 

Ellis, Dorothy Myrta, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Statistician, Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

Ellis, James Oliver, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). With Sidney Blumenthal & Co., 
Uncasville, Conn. 

Emerson, Frank Warren, II, *03 (D). 130 Butman Road, Lowell, Mass. 

Engstrom, Karl Emil, VI, ’12 (D). (S.B. 1916, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology.) 36 Fairfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Enloe, Winfred Paige, I, *22 (D). Assistant Superintendent, The W. A. Handley 
Manufacturing Company, Roanoke, Ala. 

Evans, Alfred Whitney, III, *03 (D). 

Evans, Paul Richard, II, *29 (D). Salesman, United States Testing Company, 
Hoboken, N. J. 

Evans, William Robinson, III, *03 (D). 309 Main Street, Bradford, Mass. 

Everett, Charles Arthur, IV, *19 (B.T.C.). Instructor, Dyeing Department, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Fairbanks, Almonte Harrison, II, *09 (D). President and General Manager, 
Fairwood Knitting Mills, Wakefield, Mass. 

Farley, Clifford Albert, VI, *28 (B.T.E.). Research Laboratory, F. C. Huyck & 
Sons, Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Farmer, Chester Jefferson, IV, *07 (D). (Ph.D. Harvard University.) Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, 111. 

Farnsworth, Harold Vincent, VI, *16 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Atkinson, 
Haserick & Co., 152 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. 

Farr, Leonard Schaefar, II, *08 (D). Superintendent, No. 2 Mill, Farr Alpaca 
Company, Holyoke, Mass. 

Farwell, Claude Chapman, VI, *23 (B.T.E.). Groton, Mass. 

Fasig, Paul Leon, IV, *28 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Thomas T. Davis & Son, Reading, 
Pa. 

Feinberg, Benjamin, II, *27 (D). With Copley Realty Company, Boston, 
Mass. 

Feindel, George Paul, IV, *24 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Union Bleachery, Greeh- 
ville, S. C. 

Feldstein, Martin Alexander, VI, *24 (B.T.E.). Radio Engineer, Amplex 
Instrument Laboratories, New York City. 

Fels, August Benedict, II, *99 (D). 190 Carroll Street, Paterson, N. J. 

Ferguson, Arthur Feiling, I, *03 (D). 

Ferguson, Thomas Dickson, Jr., VI, *32 (B.T.E.). With Gilbert Knitting 
Company, Little Falls, N. Y. 

Ferguson, William Gladstone, III, *09 (D). Assistant Agent, Ludlow Manufac- 
turing Associates, Ludlow, Mass. 

Ferris, Arthur Leon, II, *28 (D). Port Rowan, Ont. 

Finlay, Harry Francis, IV, *10 (D). Chemist and Salesman, National Aniline 
and Chemical Company, Boston, Mass. 

Fisher, Russell Todd, VI, *14 (D). *25 (B.T.E.). Secretary, National Associa- 
tion of Cotton Manufacturers, 80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Fiske, Starr Hollinger, II, *09 (D). Owner and Manager, Wing’s Cash Market, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Fitzgerald, John Francis, IV, *18 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Golden Bell Cleaners, Inc., 
Malden, Mass. 

Fitzgerald, John Francis, IV, *28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, United States Finishing 
Company, Providence, R. I. 

Fleischmann, Meyer, IV, *20 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist, Real Silk Hosiery Mills, 
Inc., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fleming, Frank Everett, IV, *06 (D). Superintendent, Dyeing and Finishing, 
Goodall Worsted Company, Sanford, Maine. 

Fletcher, Howard Varnum, III, *25 (D). Sales Supervisor, Sun Oil Company, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fletcher, Roland Hartwell, VI, *10 (D). Engineering Department, Pressed 
Steel Car Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 


77 

Flood, Thomas Henry, IV, *27 (B.T.C.). Chemist, National Aniline & Chemical 
Company, Toronto, Ont. 

Flynn, Thomas Patrick, IV, *11 (D). 

Ford, Edgar Robinson, IV, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Dyeing and Finishing, 
Sayles Biltmore Bleacheries, Biltmore, N. C. 

Ford, Stephen Kenneth, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Marden-Wild Corporation, 
500 Columbia Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Forsaith, Charles Henry, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Superintendent, Nashua Manu- 
facturing Company (Jackson Mills), Nashua, N. H. 

Forsaith, Ralph Allen, VI, *16 (B.T.E.). In charge of Textile Section, Anderson- 
Meyer Company, Ltd., Shanghai, China. 

Forsyth, Harold Downes, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Treasurer, Wm. Forsyth & Sons 
Company, Lynn, Mass. 

Forsythe, George, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.) With the Chicopee Manufacturing Corpora- 
tion, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Foster, Boutwell Hyde, VI, *17 (B.T.E.) . Textile Research, United States 
Rubber Company, Passaic, N. J. 

Foster, Clifford Eastman, II, *01 (D). With National Silk Spinning Company, 
New Bedford, Mass. 

Fowle, Edwin Daniels, VI, *24 (B.T.E.). Associate Editor, “Textile World,” 
330 West 42nd Street, New York City. 

Fox, David James, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). With Horner Brothers Woolen Mills, 
Eaton Rapids, Mich. 

Franks, Jerome, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). (M.S. 1929, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology.) 44 Midwood Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fredrickson, Charles Joseph, Jr., IV, *29 (B.T.C.). Chemist, White & Hodges, 
Everett, Mass. 

French, Wallace Howe, IV, *31 (B.T.C.). Second Hand in Dye House, Law- 
rence Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Frost, Harold Benjamin, II, *12 (D). Salesman, Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Fuller, Allen Reed, IV, *17 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, A. E. Staley Manufactur- 
ing Company, Decatur, 111. 

Fuller, George, I, -03 (D). Consulting Textile Expert, Cox and Fuller, 320 
Broadway, New York City. 

Gahm, George Leonhard, II, *06 (D). Superintendent, Wood Worsted Mills, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Gainey, Francis William, IV, *11 (D). Colorist, National Aniline & Chemical 
Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gale, Harry Laburton, III, *10 (D). With J. P. Stevens Company, 44 Leonard 
Street, New York City. 

Gallagher, Arthur Francis, IV, *30 (B.T.C.). Overseer of Dyeing, Hillsborough 
Mills, Wilton, N. H. 

Gallagher, John Waters, II, *27 (D). 19 Robinson Avenue, Danbury, Conn. 

Garlick, Mrs. Dorothy M. (Burbeck, Dorothy M.), IV, *20 (B.T.C.). 192 

Great Road, Maynard, Mass. 

Garner, Allen Frank, II, *30 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Kezar Falls Woolen 
Company, Kezar Falls, Me. 

Gaudet, Walter Urban, II, *29 (D). Resident Engineer, Liberty Mutual Insur- 
ance Company, Charlotte, N. C. 

Gay, Olin Dow, II, *08 (D). President, Gay Brothers Company, Cavendish, Vt. 

Gerrish, Walter, III, *03 (D). 

Gifford, Alden Ives, Jr., VI, *34 (B.T.E.). With Newmarket Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Gillespie, Francis Clifford, IV, *34 (B.T.C.). Dyeing Department, Silk Divi- 
sion, Arnold Print Works, North Adams, Mass. 

Gillie, Stanley James, I, *22 (D). Manager, Greensboro Sampling House of the 
United States Testing Company, Inc., 526 Walker Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 

Gillon, Sara Agnes, Illb, *06 (G). 

Gilman, Ernest Dana, II, *26 (D). Designer, Pacific Mills, Worsted Division, 
Lawrence, Mass. 


78 

Gleklen, Leo, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Boss Dyer, Hope Knitting Company, Paw- 
tucket, R. I. 

Glickman, Bernhardt Brecher, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). (B.S. 1931, Columbia Uni- 
versity.) Optometrist, 1010 East Tremont Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 

Glowacki, Joseph, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). 105 Salem Street, Andover, Mass. 

Glowienski, Mitchell, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Aniline Products 
Company, 50 Union Square, New York City. 

Godfrey, Harold Thomas, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Davis & Furber Ma- 
chine Co., North Andover, Mass. 

Goldberg, George, VI, ’10 (D). Manufacturer’s Agent, Liberty Lace and Braid 
Company, 88 Bedford St., Boston, Mass. 

Goldenberg, Louis G., VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). Foreman of Knitting, Raynit Mills, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldman, Moses Hyman, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Manufacturing Chemist, Gold- 
man’s Moleo Products Company, 210 Broadway, Everett, Mass. 

Golec, Edward Lucian, III, ’32 (D). Assistant Designer, President Suspender 
Company, Shirley, Mass. 

Goller, Harold Poehlmann, II, ’23 (D). Greenville, S. C. 

Goodhue, Amy Helen, Illb, ’00 (C). See Harrison, Mrs. Arthur. 

Gooding, Francis Earle, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). Superintendent, Calco Chemical 
Company, Bound Brook, N. J. 

Goosetrey, Arthur, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). 

Goosetrey, John Thomas, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, New York Mills 
Corporation, New York Mills, N. Y. 

Gottschalck, Lawrence William, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). With Scott & Williams, 
Inc., 366 Broadway, New York City. 

Gould, Norman Culver, VI, ’19 (B.T.E.). Textile Designer, F. C. Huyck & 
Sons, Albany, N. Y. 

Graham, Robert Theodore, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Sales Service Section, DuPont 
Rayon Company of New York, at the Aberfoyle Manufacturing Company, 
Chester, Pa. 

Greenbaum, Herbert Baron, III, ’29 (D). Salesman, Glenerry Woolen Com- 
pany, New York City. 

Greenberg, Archie, II, ’21 (D), President and Treasurer, Archie Greenberg 
Inc., Worcester, Mass. 

Greendonner, George John, Jr., IV, ’30 (B.T.G.). With National Aniline & 
Chemical Co., Inc., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Greenwood, John Roger, Jr., II, ’27 (D). Assistant Superintendent, D. N. 
Taft Manufacturing Company, Oxford, Mass. 

Gregory, Robert Crockett, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Firestone 
Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. 

Gross, Herman Peter, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 94 Shanley Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Guild, Lawrence Winfield, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). Sales Executive, Guild Brothers, 
Inc., 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Gwinnell, George Harry, II, ’25 (D). Head Designer, Berkshire Woolen Com- 
pany, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Gyzander, Arne Kolthoff, IV, ’09 (D). With National Aniline and Chemical 
Co., Inc., 40 Rector Street, New York City. 

Haddad, Nassib, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, United States Rubber 
Products, Inc., Passaic, N. J. 

Hadley, Richard Francis, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). With Parks & Woolson Machine 
Company, Springfield, Vt. 

Hadley, Walter Eastman, IV, ’08 (D). Consulting Chemist, Standard Coosa 
Thatcher Company, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Hadley, Wilfred Nourse, II, ’22 (D). Manager, Parks & Woolson Machine 
Company, Springfield, Vt. 

Hager, Hazen Otis, II, ’21 (C). Treasurer, Suburban Gas and Equipment Com- 
pany, Portland, Maine. 

Hale, Alfred Sandel, IV, ’09 (D). Vice-President and Treasurer, Liondale 
Bleach, Dye & Print Works, Rockaway, N. J. 


79 

Hale, Ralph Edgar, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, The Bell Company, 
Worcester, Mass. 

Hall, Frederick Kilby, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). (A.M. 1930, The George Washington 
University.) Economist, United States Department of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Hall, Stanley Arundel, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). 904 Main Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Halsell, Elam Ryan, I, ’04 (C). Assistant Superintendent, Whittenton Manu- 
facturing Company, Taunton, Mass. 

Hammond, Chester Twombly, II, ’23 (D). South Acton, Mass. 

Hanscom, Edwin Thomas, II, ’27 (D). Assistant Production Manager, Hart- 
ford Woolen Mills, Hartford, Vt. 

Hardie, Newton Gary, I, ’23 (D). Superintendent, Inman Mills, Inman, S. C. 

Hardman, Joseph Edwin, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 1102 Chelmsford Street, Chelms- 
ford, Mass. 

Hardy, Philip Lewis, VI, ’10 (D). Contractor, Andover, Mass. 

Harmon, Charles Francis, I, ’99 (D). 

Harrington, Thomas, IV, ’15 (D). Superintendent, Monarch Leather Com- 
pany, 1127 West Division Street, Chicago, 111. 

Harris, Charles Edward, I, ’05 (D). Superintendent, Martin Rocking Fifth 
Wheel and Trailer Company, Westfield, Mass. 

Harris, George Simmons, I, ’02 (C). Treasurer, Springs Cotton Mills, Lan- 
caster N, C. 

Harrison,’ Mrs. Arthur (Goodhue, Amy Helen), Illb, ’00 (C). R. F. D. No. 
2, Lowell, Mass. 

Hart, Arthur Norman, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). 

Hart, Howard Roscoe, I, ’23 (D). General Superintendent, Aiken Mills, Inc. & 
Seminole Mills, Langley, S. C. 

Haskell, Walter Frank, IV, ’02 (D). Overseer of Dyeing, Dana Warp Mills, 
Westbrook, Maine. 

Hassett, Paul Joseph, IV, ’12 (D). With L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters, 
Inc., Cortland, N. Y. 

Hathaway, William Tabor, II, ’26 (D). Civil Engineer, United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, Boston, Mass. 

Ha thorn, George Wilmer, IV, ’07 (D). Chemist, Lawrence Gas & Electric 
Company, Lawrence, Mass. 

Hathorne* Berkeley Lewis, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Consulting Chemist, Hathorne & 
Green, 114 East 32nd Street, New York City. 

Hay, Ernest Crawford, II, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Monomac Spinning Com- 
pany, Lawrence, Mass. 

Haynes, Amos Kempton, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Southern Sales Representative, 
Rohm & Haas Co., Inc., 1109 Independence Building, Charlotte, N. C. 

Hegy, Gerard John Joseph, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). Dyer, Hegy’s, Inc., Cleaners and 
Dyers, Holyoke, Mass. 

Hendrickson, Walter Alexander, II, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Bradley Knit- 
ting Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hennigan, Arthur Joseph, II, ’06 (D). President, Bornemann Company, 229 
Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Hetherman, Patrick Joseph, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Chemist, 70 Rolfe Street, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Hibbard, Frederick William, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Investment Broker, Andrews 
& Hibbard, 701 Bay State Building, Lawrence, Mass. 

Hildreth, Harold William, II, ’07 (D). Westford, Mass. 

Hillman, Ralph Greeley, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Assistant Superintendent, Samson 
Cordage Works, Shirley, Mass. 

Hindle, Milton, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Department of Textile Engineer- 
ing, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Hintze, Thomas Forsyth, I, ’06 (C). 

Hockridge, Stanley Squire, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Assistant, Arnold 
Print Works, North Adams, Mass. 

Hodge, Harold Bradley, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). 69 Summer Street, Manchester, 
Conn. 


80 

Hoffman, Richard Robert, II, ’21 (C). 

Holbrook, Ralph Wentworth, IV, *29 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist and Purchasing 
Agent, Crompton Company, West Warwick, R. I. 

Holden, Francis Crawford, IV, ’09 (D). Chemist, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 1155 
Manhattan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Holden, John Sanford, II, *20 (D). Manufacturer, Automatic Machine Prod- 
ucts Company, Attleboro, Mass. 

Holgate, Benjamin, III, *02 (C). Agent, Boott Mills, Lowell, Mass. 

Hollings, James Louis, I, ’05 (D). National Resources Board, Washington, 
D. C. 

Hollstein, William Diedrick, VI, *25 (B.T.E.). Student, New York University 
and Bellevue Medical College, New York City. 

Holmes, Otis Milton, VI, ’13 (B.T.E.). Draftsman, United Shoe Machinery 
Corporation, Beverly, Mass. 

Holt, Laurence Currier, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Textile Technician, Celanese Cor- 
poration of America, Amcelle, Md. 

Hood, Leslie Newton, IV, *12 (D). Bleachery Superintendent, Selma Manu- 
facturing Company, Selma, Ala. 

Hook, Russell Weeks, IV, *05 (D). Textile Chemist, Arthur D. Little, Inc., 
30 Charles River Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

Hooper, Clarence, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Southern Dyers, Inc., Burlington, 
N. C. 

Horne, James Albert, I, *24 (D). Salesman, Wellington, Sears & Co., 65 Worth 
Street, New York City. 

Horsfall, George Gordon, II, ’04 (C). Assistant Dyer, Interwoven Mills, Inc., 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Horton, Chester Temple, VI, *14 (B.T.E.). Wilmington, Mass. 

Hosmer, Frank Barbour, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chemist, U. S. Dyestuff Corpora- 
tion, Boston, Mass. 

Houghton, Robert Kingsbury, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist, Bigelow- 
Sanford Carpet Company, Thompsonville, Conn. 

Howard, Lome Fernley, IV, *32 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Beaver Brook Mill, Collins- 
ville, Mass. 

Howarth, Charles Lincoln, IV, *17 (B.T.C.). Assistant Professor of Dyeing, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Howe, Woodbury Kendall, I, *10 (D). Assistant Superintendent, Merrimack 
Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Howorth, Harmon, VI, *30 (B.T.E.). Textile Development, Celanese Corpo- 
ration of America, Amcelle, Md. 

Hoyt, Charles William Henry, IV, *07 (D). 27 Lenox Avenue, White Plains, 
N. Y. 

Hsu, Hsueh-Chang, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Hubbard, Harold Harper, I, ’22 (D). Salesman, J. H. Lane & Co., 250 West 
57th Street, New York City. 

Hubbard, Ralph King, IV, ’ll (D). President and Treasurer, Packard Mills, 
Inc., Webster, Mass. 

Huising, Geronimo Huerva, I, *08 (D). 

Hunt, Chester Lansing, III, *05 (C). 

Hun ton, John Horace, II, *11 (D). 68 Walton Park, Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Hurd, Ira Swain, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.) . Research Chemist and Demonstrator, 
Rohm & Haas Co., Bristol, Pa. 

Hurtado, Leopoldo, VI, ’10 (D). General Manager, Cia. Promotora de Industria 
y Comercio S. A., Uruapan Michoacan, Mex. 

Hurwitz, Jacob, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). 

Hutton, Clarence, III, *03 (G). Proprietor, Central Garage, Quincy, Mass. 

Huyck, William Francis, II, ’34 (D). Student, Harvard Business School, 
Boston, Mass. 

Hyman, Wolfred, II, ’28 (D). Assistant Manager, Hyman Brothers, Boston, 
Mass. 

Irvine, James Andrew, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). Emplojment Manager, Pacific Mills, 
Worsted Division, Lawrence, Mass. 


81 

Isaacson, George Franklin, II, ’26 (D). With Clarence S. Brown & Co., 40 
Worth Street, New York City. 

Ivers, Gerald Anthony, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Instructor, Lowell High School, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Jaeger, Robert William, Jr., IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Lubrication Engineer, Standard 
Oil Company (Indiana), 910 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Jarek, Julius, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Research Chemist, American Powder Company, 
Maynard, Mass. 

Jelleme, William Oscar, I, ’10 (D). With Pacific Mills, 214 Church Street, New 
York City. 

Jen, Shang Wu, I, ’21 (D). 

Jessop, Charles Clifford, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). 68 Lathrop Avenue, Madison, N. J. 

Johnson, Arthur Kimball, IV, ’13 (D). (S.B. 1917, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology.) With George D. Millett, Andover, Mass. 

Johnson, George Henry, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Director of Research, Laundry 
Owners National Association, Joliet, 111. 

Johnson, Norman Albin, IV, ’31 (B.T.C. ). Managing Editor, American 
Dyestuff Reporter, Howes Publishing Company, 440 Fourth Avenue, New 
York City. 

Johnson, Philip Stanley, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). 

Jones, Bliss Morris, IV, ’30 (B. T. C.). 

Jones, Everett Amos, III, ’05 (D). Superintendent, Nye & Wait Kilmarnock 
Corporation, Auburn, N. Y. 

Jones, Nathaniel Erskine, I, ’21 (D). Assistant Superintendent, E. L. Watkins 
Company, Portland, Maine. 

Joslin, Harold Wheeler, II, ’28 (D). Milford, N. H. 

Joy, Thomas, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Industrial Oils, Gulf Refining Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

Jury, Alfred Elmer, IV, ’04 (D). Agent, Winnsboro Mills, Winnsboro, S. C. 

Kaatze, Julius, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). 

Kao, Chieh-Ching, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Karanfilian, John Hagop, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). 

Kay, Harry Pearson, II, ’09 (D). Associate Member, Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Kendall, Charles Henry, II, ’23 (D). Superintendent, Bridgewater Woolen 
Company, Bridgewater, Vt. 

Kennedy, Francis Charles, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Product Development Depart- 
ment, The Fisk Rubber Company, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Kenney, Frederick Leo, II, ’27 (D). Mill Superintendent, Uxbridge Worsted 
Company, Uxbridge, Mass. 

Kent, Clarence LeBaron, III, ’06 (C). Manager, Standard Oil Company, South 
Portland, Maine. 

Keough, Wesley Lincoln, II, ’10 (D). 491 Eldora Road, Pasadena, Calif. 

Kidder, Glen Mortimer, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist and Technologist, 
Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, 111. 

Killheffer, John Vincent, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Manager, E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Charlotte, N. C. 

Kilmartin, John Joseph, I, ’31 (D). Research Department, Bates Manufactur- 
ing Company, Lewiston, Me. 

King, Daniel Joseph, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 158 Pleasant Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Kingsbury, Percey Fox, IV, ’01 (D). 323 Terhune Avenue, Passaic, N. J. 

Knowland, Daniel Power, IV, ’07 (D). Chief Chemist, Geigy Company, Inc., 89 
Barclay Street. New York City. 

Knox, Joseph Carleton, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Assistant Engineer, Massachusetts 
Department of Health, Boston, Mass. 

Kokoska, Michael George, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). 120 Lakeview Avenue, Lowell, 
Mass 

Kolsky, Samuel Irving, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 

Konieczny, Henry, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 1276 Bridge Street, Lowell, Mass. 


82 

Kostopoulos, Emanuel Arthur, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Textile Inspector, War 
Department, U. S. Government, Quartermaster’s Depot, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Krishan, Maharaj, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Montgomery, India. 

Kuo, Limao, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.) . In charge of Quality Testing Division, Shanghai 
Bureau of Inspection and Testing of Commercial Commodities, Shanghai, 
China. 

Lamb, Arthur Franklin, II, ’10 (D). In business, Cleansing and Dyeing, Rock- 
land, Maine. 

Lamont, Robert Laurence, II, ’12 (D). Secretary, L. F. Grammes & Sons, Inc., 
Allentown, Pa. 

Lamprey, Leslie Balch, IV, ’16 (B.T.D.). Lawrence Post Office, Lawrence, 
Mass. 

Lamson, George Francis, I, ’00 (D). 117 Westford Circle, Springfield, Mass. 

Lane, John William, I, ’06 (C). 

Lane, Oliver Fellows, IV, ’15 (B.T.D.). Technical Service, Sales Department, 
Krebs Pigment aud Color Corp., Newark, N. J. 

Larratt, John Francis, II, ’22 (D). Glenark Mill, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Laughlin, James Knowlton, III, ’09 (D). 

Laurin, Eric Thursten Lawrence, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Superintendent of Dyeing, 
Lincoln Bleachery, Lonsdale, R. I. 

Laurin, Sven Albert, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). 40 Lundberg Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Lawson, Russell Monroe, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). Assistant to Superintendent, 
Watts Regulator Company, Lawrence, Mass. 

Leavitt, George Herbert, II, ’26 (D). Efficiency Expert, F. C. Huyck & Sons, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Leblanc, Gerald Alderic, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). 

Lee, William Henry, II, ’05 (C). 

Leitch, Harold Watson, IV, ’14 (B.T.D.). General Superintendent, Worsted 
Division, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lemire, Joseph Emile, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Mathematics Instructor, Lowell High 
School, Lowell, Mass. 

Leonard, Leo Edward, I, ’27 (D). Designer, Worcester Textile Company, Valley 
Falls, R. I. 

Lewis, George Kenneth, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Sales Division, Sonoco Products 
Company, Hartsville, S. C. 

Lewis, LeRoy Clark, IV, ’08 (D). Representative, Hess Goldsmith & Co., Inc., 
New York City. 

Lewis, Walter Scott, IV, ’05 (D). Farm Credit Administration, U. S. Gov- 
ernment, Washington, D. C. 

Lifland, Abraham, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Artistic Dyeing Company, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lifland, Bessie, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Assistant Chemist, Massachusetts Knitting 
Mills, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Lifland, Morris, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). General Manager, Brockton Webbing Com- 
pany, Campello, Mass. 

Lillis, Marvin Hale, IV, ’14 (D). 40 Lawrence Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lindsly, Walter Coburn, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Bigelow-Sanford 
Carpet Company, Thompsonville, Conn. 

Linsey, Edward, II, ’25 (D). 140 Boylston Street, Malden, Mass. 

Logan, George Leslie, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Secretary, Tompkins Brothers Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lombard, Carleton Joshua, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Vice-President, Riggs & Lom- 
bard Textile Machinery, Lowell, Mass. 

Loney, Robert William, II, ’22 (D). College Weavers, Inc., Northampton, 
Mass 

Longbottom, Parker Wyman, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Claremont Waste 
Manufacturing Company, Claremont, N. H. 

Loveless, Everton Hanscom, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). Research Engineer, Pacific Mills, 
Rayon Division, Lawrence, Mass. 

Lowe, John Charles, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). Assistant Professor, Department of 
Worsted Yarns, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 


83 

Lowe, Phillip Russell, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Resident Engineer, Associated Factory 
Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, Boston, Mass. 

Lucey, Edmund Ambrose, II, ’04 (D). Vice-President and General Manager, 
Glastonbury Knitting Company, Addison, Conn., and President, Glastonbury 
Sales Corporation, 93 Worth Street, New York City. 

Lussier, Joseph Adrien, II, ’27 (D). Staff Superintendent, Hood Rubber Com- 
pany, Inc., Watertown, Mass. 

McAllister, Gordon Algeo, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). North Billerica, Mass. 

McCann, John Joseph, Jr., VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Engineer, William H. Baker, 
Boston, Mass. 

McCool, Frank Leslie, IV, ’10 (D). Resident Manager, Sandoz Chemical Works, 
Inc., 930 New Industrial Trust Building, Providence, R. I. 

Macdonald, Hector Graham, IV, ’19 (B. T. C.). Superintendent of Dyeing, 
Franklin Process Company, Providence, R. I. 

McDonald, Gerald Francis, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). With Merrimack Hat Corpora- 
tion, Amesbury, Mass. 

McDonald, John Joseph, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Teacher of Testing and Dyeing, 
Textile High School, New York, N. Y. 

McDonnell, William Henry, I, ’06 (C). Lawyer, McDonnell & White, 40 Court 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

McDougall, Francis Gerard, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). U. S. Postal Department, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McGee, Francis Patrick, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Teacher, Lowell High School, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McGowan, Frank Robert, VI, ’15 (B.T.E.). 

McGowan, Henry Earl, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Instructor, Lowell High School, 
Lowell, Mass. 

McGuire, Edward Perkins, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). With James McCreery & Co., 
6 West 34th Street, New York City. 

Mackay, Stewart, III, ’07 (D). Assistant Professor of Textile Design, Lowell 
Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

McKay, Benedict Josephus, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Stoughton, Mass. 

McKenna, Hugh Francis, IV, ’05 (D). Chicago Manager, United Indigo and 
Chemical Company, Ltd., 218 West Kinzie Street, Chicago, 111. 

McKinnon, Norman, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Chelmsford, Mass. 

McKinstry, James Bradley, II, ’25 (D). Superintendent, Millbury Woolen Com- 
pany, Millbury, Mass. 

McKittrick, Raymond Wellington, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Selling Agent, Frank 
G. W. McKittrick, Lowell, Mass. 

McLean, Earle Raymond, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Industrial Research Fellow, Mel- 
lon Institute of Industrial Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MacPherson, Wallace Angus, III, ’04 (D). Designer, Wuskanut Mills, Inc., 
Farnumsville, Mass. 

McQuaid, Barton Mathewman, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Government Inspector of 
Textiles, Quartermaster’s Depot, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Macher, Henry, II, ’23 (D). Secretary, Central Importing Company, Inc., of 
New Jersey, Passaic, N. J. 

Maguire, James Joseph, II, ’28 (D). Assistant Designer, Glenark Mill (Ux- 
bridge Worsted Company), Woonsocket, R. I. 

Maher, Margaret Mary, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Assistant, Hub Hosiery 
Mills, Lowell, Mass. 

Mahoney, George Stephen, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Superintendent, Franklin Cotton 
Mill Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mailey, Howard Twisden, II, ’08 (D). Manufacturing Superintendent, Worsted 
Manufacturing, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Manning, Frederick David, IV, ’10 (D). 323 Montgomery Street, Fall River, 
Mass. 

Marinel, Walter Newton, I, ’01 (D). Auto Mechanic, North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Mark, Aris Sawa, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). Sales Department, Franklin Manufacturing 
Company, Inc., 40 Worth Street, New York City. 


84 

Markarian, Haig, IV, ’33 (R.T.C.). Drug Clerk, Arlington Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 
Marshall, Chester Stanley, II, ’22 (D). Superintendent, College Weavers, Inc., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Martin, Harry Warren, IV, ’11( D). With Hood Rubber Company, Inc., 
Watertown, Mass. 

Mason, Archibald Lee, VI, ’09 (D). Concord Road, Billerica, Mass. 

Mason, Philip Edwin, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Watson Park Company, 

Ballardvale, Mass. 

Mather, Harold Thomas, VI, ’13 (D). Inspector, Associated Factory Mutual 
Fire Insurance Companies, Boston, Mass. 

Mathieu, Alfred Jules, II, ’20 (D). Salesman, Wools and Commission Dyeing, 
Bernon Worsted Mills, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Matthews, Elmer Clark, II, ’17 (D). General Manager, Thermo Mills, Inc., 
West Sand Lake, N. Y. 

Matthews, Raymond Lewis, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, General 
Dyestuff Corporation, 230 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Matthews, Robert Jackson, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Salesman, Pacific Mills, 261 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Mauersberger, Herbert Richard Carl, III, ’18 (D). Textile Consultant, and 
Editor, Rayon Publishing Corporation, 303 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
Mazer, Samuel, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). In business, Dyer and Converter of Yarns, 
S. Mazer & Co., Allston, Mass. 

Meadows, William Ransom, I, ’04 (D). Cotton Registrar, Chicago Board of 
Trade, Chicago, 111. 

Meehan, John Joseph, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 35 Varney Street, Lowell, Mass. 
Meek, Lotta, Illb, ’07 (C). See Parker, Mrs. Herbert L. 

Meeker, Samuel, IV, ’27 (B.T.C. ). Chemist, Arkansas Company, Inc., 233 
Broadway, New York City. 

Meinelt, Herbert Eugene, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Ayer Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 
Merchant, Edith Clara, Illb, ’00 (C). Supervisor of Art, Public Schools, Lowell, 

Mass. 

Merrill, Allan Blanchard, IV, ’ll (D). Technical Superintendent, B. F. Good- 
rich Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Merrill, Gilbert Roscoe, VI, ’19 (B.T.E.). Professor of Textiles; in charge of 
Cotton Yarn Department, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Merrill, John Leslie, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). Instructor in Weaving, Lowell Textile 
Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Meyers, Chester William, IV, ’27 (B.T.C.). Associate Dyer, Massachusetts 
Knitting Mills, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Mid wood, Arnold Joseph, IV, ’05 (D). Salesman, Dyestuffs Corporation of 
America, 281 Franklin Street, Boston, Mass. 

Miller, Joshua, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Research Associate, Celanese Corporation of 
America, National Association of Dyers and Cleaners Institute, Silver Springs, 
Md. 

Minge, Jackson Chadwick, I, ’01 (C). 

Mirsky, Leon Robert, II, ’19 (D). 230 West 97th Street, New York City. 
Mitchell, Charles Alvah, II, ’24 (D). Assistant Superintendent of Woolen De- 
partment, Roxbury Carpet Company, Saxonville, Mass. 

Moller, Ernest Arthur, II, ’22 (D). Eastern Representative, Petroleum Sales 
Division, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Inc., Boston, Mass. 

Molloy, Francis Henry, II, ’16 (D). 35 Pope Street, Hudson, Mass. 

Moody, Leon Eugene, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Central Laboratory, U. S. 
Finishing Company, Providence, R. I. 

Moore, Edward Francis, II, ’25 (D). Manager, La Crosse Hosiery Company, 
La Crosse, Wis. 

Moore, Everett Byron, I, ’05 (D). With The Bridgeport Coach Lace Company, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Moore, Karl Remick, IV, ’ll (D). Chief Chemist, Alexander Smith & Sons, 
Yonkers, N. Y. 

Moore, William Joseph, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Colorist, Pacific Mills, Lawrence, 

Mass. 


85 

Moorhouse, William Roy, IV, ’01 (D). Resident Manager, National Aniline 
and Chemical Company, Inc., 150 Causeway Street, Boston, Mass. 

Moran, Edward Francis, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Lawrence Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Morrill, Howard Andrew, VI, ’16 (D). 

Morris, Merrill George, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Chemist, National Aniline & Chemi- 
cal Co., 357 West Erie Street, Chicago, 111. 

Morrison, Haven Asa, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Overseer of Dyeing, The Barre Wool 
Combing Company, Ltd., South Barre, Mass. 

Morrison, Roland Charles, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). With U. S. Finishing Company, 
Providence, R. I. 

Morse, Judson Pickering, II, ’33 (D). Wool House, Fred Wolstenholme, 
170 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 

Mullaney, John Francis, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Higgins & Mullaney, 323 Chalifoux 
Building, Lowell, Mass. 

Mullen, Arthur Thomas, II, ’09 (D). Industrial Shop Manager, Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, West Concord, Mass. 

Munroe, Sydney Philip, I, ’12 (D). Assistant to President, The Cotton Textile 
Institute, Inc., 320 Broadway, New York City. 

Murphy, John Joseph, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Laboratory Assistant, Bates Manu- 
facturing Company, Lewiston, Me. 

Murray, James, IV, ’13 (D). Chief Chemist, Martin Cantine Company, Sauger- 
ties, N. Y. 

Murray, James Andrew, II, ’10 (D). 15 Sagamore Avenue, West Medford, 
Mass 

Myers, Walter Flemings, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Employment Manager, Talbot 
Mills, North Billerica, Mass. 

Najar, G. George, IV, ’03 (D). Dyer and Bleacher, Monument Mills, Housa- 
tonic, Mass. 

Nary, James Anthony, II, ’22 (D). Manager, United States Testing Company, 
Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Nelson, Roy Clayton, II, ’21 (C). Technical Superintendent, Assabet Mills, 
Maynard, Mass. 

Nelson, Russell Sprague, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.). With Draper Corporation, Hopedale, 
Mass. 

Neugroschl, Sigmond Israel, I, ’21 (D). 

Newall, J. Douglas, IV, ’09 (D). Superintendent, Bondsville Bleachery & Dye 
Works, Bondsville, Mass. 

Newcomb, Guy Houghton, IV, ’06 (C). Manager, Philadelphia Office, E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours & Co., 128 South Front Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Neyman, Julius Ellis, IV, ’15 (B.T.D.). Furniture Dealer, Neyman Furniture 
Company, 193-199 Middlesex Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Nichols, Raymond Elmore, VI, ’10 (D). Draftsman, H. E. Fletcher Company, 
West Chelmsford, Mass. 

Niven, Robert Scott, VI, ’12 (D). Draftsman, General Electric Company, Lynn, 
Mass. 

Nostrand, Mrs. William L. (Conklin, Jennie Grace), Illb, ’05 (C). 

O’Brien, Philip Francis, II, ’15 (D). (B.S. New York University, M.A. 

Fordham University.) Chairman, Textile Department, Textile High 
School, New York City. 

O’Connell, Clarence Edward, IV, ’ll (D). Dyer, National Aniline and Chemi- 
cal Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 

O’Connor, Lawrence Dennis, VI, ’17 (D). With Beggs & Cobb, Winchester, 
Mass 

O’Donneil, John Delaney, I, ’04 (C). 

O’Hara, William Francis, IV, ’04 (C). 

Olson, Carl Oscar, II, ’24 (D). Owner, Budget Beauty Salon, Hartford, Conn. 

Orlauski, Anthony, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Dyer, Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Manchester, N. H. 

Orr, Andrew Stewart, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Manager, Storey & Co., Brockton, Mass. 


86 

Osborne, George Gordon, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). (M. Sc. 1932, North Carolina 
State College.) With Warwick Mills, 220 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

Othote, Louis Joseph, I, ’23 (D). Salesman and Technician, Haywood, Mackay 
& Valentine, Inc., 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Palais, Samuel, IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). With Worcester Knitting Company, Worces- 
ter Tvlass 

Parigian, Harold Hrant, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Archer Rubber Company, 
Milford, Mass. 

Parker, Everett Nichols, I, ’05 (D). President, Parker Spool and Bobbin Com- 
pany, 27-53 Middle Street, Lewiston, Maine. 

Parker, Mrs. Herbert L. (Meek, Lotta L.), IHb, ’07 (C). 4 Brookside Circle 
Auburn, Maine. 

Parker, Hubert Frederic, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Engineer, New York & Pennsyl- 
vania Co., and Castanea Paper Company, Lock Haven, Pa. 

Parker, John George, Jr., IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). With Amoskeag Mills, Man- 
chester N" H 

Parkin, Robert Wilson, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). With Limerick Yarn Mills, Limerick, 
Me. 

Parkis, William Lawton, I, ’09 (D). 32 Summit Street, South Manchester, 
Conn. 

Parsons, Charles Sumner, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). With Hathaway Manufacturing 
Company, New Bedford, Mass. 

Peabody, Roger Merrill, II, ’16 (D). With Watson-Park Company, Ballard- 
vale, Mass. 

Pearlstein, Maxwell, III, ’28 (D). 37 Lawrence Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. 

Pearson, Alfred Henry, IV, ’ll (D). Salesman, Ciba Company, Inc., 157 
Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Peary, John Ervin, III, ’31 (D). Assistant Designer, Pepperell Manufacturing 
Company, Biddeford, Me. 

Pease, Chester Chapin, I, ’09 (D). Agent, Columbian Mills (Otis Company), 
Greenville, N. H. 

Peck, Carroll Wilmot, IV, ’13 (D). Vice-President, George Mann & Co., Inc., 
Providence, R. I. 

Penney, Cabot William, III, ’33 (D). Night Superintendent, Wyandotte 
Worsted Company, Rochester, N. H. 

Pensel, George Robert, IV, ’13 (B.T.D.). Vice-President, Ritter Chemical 
Company, Inc., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Perkins, John Edward, III, ’00 (D). 24 Abbott Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Perkins, J. Dean, III, ’08 (D). Special Agent, Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Perlman, Samuel, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). 

Perlmuter, Barney Harold, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.). Treasurer, Mallon Mattress 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Pero, Richard Omer, II, ’31 (D). Farnsworth Company, Lisbon Center, Maine. 

Peterson, Eric Arthur, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Wyandotte Worsted Com- 
pany, Waterville, Me. 

Petty, George Edward, I, ’03 (C). 211 Ashe Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

Phaneuf, Maurice Philippe, III, ’20 (D). Accountant, Librairie St. Michel, 
Boston, Mass. 

Phelan, Bernard Michael, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, National Aniline 
and Chemical Co., 351 Abbott Road, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Pierce, George Whitwell, IV, ’25 (B.T.G.). Superintendent of Dyeing and 
Finishing, Kramer Hosiery Company, Nazareth, Pa. 

Piligian, Hiag Nishan, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Bay State Thread 
Works, Springfield, Mass. 

Pillsbury, Ray Charles, I, ’13 (D). Superintendent, Cheney Brothers, Man- 
chester, Conn. 

Pizzuto, Joseph James, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 65 Circular Avenue, Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

Plaisted, Webster E., II, ’18 (D). Superintendent of Woolens, Pacific Mills, 
(Worsted Division), Lawrence, Mass. 


87 

Potter, Carl Howard, I, ’09 (D). Direct Mill Agent and Broker, 100 Worth 
Street, New York City. 

Pottinger, James Gilbert, II, ’12 (D). Director in charge of Purchasing, 
Reliance Manufacturing Company, 212 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Powers, Walter Wellington, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Divisional Works Manager, 
Fiberloid Corporation, Indian Orchard, Mass. 

Pradel, Alois Joseph, III, ’00 (D). Designer, Killingly Worsted Company, 
Danielson, Conn. 

Pradel, Mrs. Alois J. (Walker, Anna G.), Illb, ’03 (C)j 78 Broad Street, 
Danielson, Conn. 

Precourt, Joseph Octave, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Chicago District Manager, Janvary 
& Wood Co. (Maysville Cotton Mills), 437 West Ontario Street, Chicago, 111. 

Prescott, Walker Flanders, IV, ’09 (D). Manager, Prescott & Co., Reg’d, 
774 Saint Paul Street, West, Montreal, Can. 

Preston, Harold Lawrence, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Bellevue Park, Wakefield, Mass. 

Prince, Sylvanus Cushing, VI, ’08 (D). 

Proctor, Braman, IV, ’08 (D). Dyestuffs Salesman, General Dyestuff Corpora- 
tion, 159 High Street, Boston, Mass. 

Putnam, George Ives, IV, ’16 (B.T.D.). Woodbridge, New Haven, Conn. 

Putnam, Leverett Nelson, IV, ’10 (D). Dyer, Pacific Mills (Worsted Division), 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Putnam, Philip Clayton, IV, ’13 (D). Foreman Dyer, Apponaug Company, 
Apponaug, R. I. 

Quigley, Gerald Francis, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). With Franklin Rayon Corporation, 
Providence, R. I. 

Quinlan, William Harold, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). 171 Highland Street, Worcester, 
Mass. 

Radford, Garland, II, ’20 (D). Vice-President, Oriental Textile Mills, Houston, 
Texas. 

Ramsdell, Theodore Ellis, I, ’02 (D). President, Monument Mills, Housatonic, 
Mass. 

Rawlinson, Richard William, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). Research Engineer and 
Designer, Nashua Manufacturing Company (Suffolk Mills), Lowell, Mass. 

Ray, Lloyd Sanford, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Maple Street, West Newbury, Mass. 

Raymond, Charles Abel, IV, ’07 (D). Essex, Mass. 

Recher, Theodore, VI, ’33 (B.T.E.). 18 Murray Street, North Providence, R. I. 

Redding, Leslie Capron, II, ’26 (D). Assistant Designer, Dunn Worsted Mills, 
Woonsocket, R. I. 

Reed, Norman Bagnell, I, ’10 (D). 102 Clark Road, Lowell, Mass. 

Reinhold, Kurt Herman, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Statistician, Russell Manufacturing 
Company, Middletown, Conn. 

Reynolds, Fred Bartlett, II, ’08 (D). Purchasing Agent, M. T. Stevens & Sons 
Company, North Andover, Mass. 

Reynolds, Isabel Halliday, III, ’03 (C). Clerk, Pacific Mills Print Works, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Reynolds, Raymond, II, ’24 (D). Supervisor, DuPont Rayon Company, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rice, Josiah Alfred, Jr., Ill, ’20 (D). Manager, Wholesale Ginghams & Wool 
Goods, Marshall Field & Co., Chicago, 111. 

Rice, Kenneth Earl, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). With Sidney Blumenthal & Co., Shelton 
Looms, Shelton, Conn. 

Rich, Edward, IV, ’15 (B.T.D.). Manager, Jackson Caldwell Company, East 
Boston, Mass. 

Rich, Everett Blaine, III, ’ll (D). “Onacove,” Sewall Road, Wolfeboro, N. H. 

Rich, Milton Scott, II, ’22 (D). Assistant Purchasing Agent, Harvard Univer- 
sity, Cambridge, Mass. 

Richardson, George Oliver, IV, ’16 (B.T.D.). Resident Manager, National 
Aniline and Chemical Company of America, Tienstin, China. 

Richardson, Richardson Perry, I, ’13 (D). Salesman, H. F. Livermore Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 


88 

Riggs, Homer Chase, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). President, Riggs & Lombard, Inc., 
Lowell, Mass. 

Ripley, George Keyes, II, ’17 (D). Textile Manufacturer, Troy Blanket Mills, 
Troy, N. H. 

Rivers, William Anthony, II, ’24 (D). Resident Agent, Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company, Woodstock, Vt. 

Robbins, Walter Archibald, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). With Columbia Mills, Inc., 
Minetto, N. Y. 

Roberson, Pat Howell, I, ’05 (C). Vice-President, Union State Bank, Pell City, 
Ala. 

Roberts, Carrie Isabel, Illb, ’05 (C). Craft Work, 37 Grace Street, Lowell, 

Mass 

Robillard, Gerald Adelbert, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). With Max Pollach & Co., 
Willimantic, Conn. 

Robinson, Ernest Warren, IV, ’08 (D). Manager, Line Division, Shakespeare 
Company, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Robinson, Russell, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Overseer, Manville-Jenckes Corporation, 
Manville, R. I. 

Robinson, William Albert, II, ’25 (D). Explorer and author, 16 Chauncy 
Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Robinson, William Carleton, III, ’03 (C). With Durands Shoe Company, 
Auburn, Maine. 

Robson, Frederick William Charles, IV, ’10 (D). 

Rodalvicz, Francis Rudolph, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Woolen 
Company, Andover, Mass. 

Royal, Louis Merry, VI, ’21 (B.T.E.). Instructor of Science and Mathematics, 
Pawtucket Senior High School, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Rundlett, Arnold Dearborn, VI, ’12 (D). Superintendent, Joseph Noone’s 
Sons Company, Peterborough, N. H. 

Runnells, Harold Nelson, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). 32 Franklin Street, Concord, N. H. 

Russell, Harold William, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). With Goodall Worsted Company, 
Sanford, Me. 

Russell, John William, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Chemist, American Lanolin Corpora- 
tion, Lawrence, Mass. 

Russell, William Samuel, Jr., VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Foreman, Johns-Manville 
Corporation, Manville, N. J. 

Ryan, David Louis, II, ’27 (D). Silk Salesman, Duplan Silk Corporation, 1450 
Broadway, New York City. 

Ryan, Lawrence Francis, IV, ’23 (B.T.C.) . Chemist, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
& Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del. 

Ryan, Millard Kenneth Thomas, Jr., II, ’24 (D). Manager, American Oriental 
Finance Corporation, 1 1 Tia Ping Road, Canton, China. 

Ryberg, Bertil August, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Research Chemist, American Associa- 
tion of Textile Chemists and Colorists, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Sadler, Thomas Sheridan, II, ’30 (D). Construction Work, Massachusetts 
State Infirmary, Tewksbury, Mass. 

Sampson, Clifford William, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Eastern Manager, Twitchell 
Process Division, Emery Industries, Inc., 180 Pawtucket Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Sanborn, Frank Morrison, VI, T9 (B.T.E.). 

Sanborn, Ralph Lyford, VI, ’16 (B.T.E.). Accountant in charge of office, 
Manville-Jenckes Company, Gastonia, N. C. 

Sandlund, Carl Seth, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Research, Propper-McCallum Hosiery 
Company, Northampton, Mass. 

Sargent, Robert Edward, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Tubize Chatillon Corpora- 
tion, 2 Park Avenue, New York City. 

Sargent, Walter Ambrose, I, ’22 (D). Instructor, Textile Shop Practice, Board 
of Education, Passaic, N. J. 

Saunders, Harold Fairbairn, IV, ’09 (D). 301 West 8th St., Coffeville, Kans. 

Savard, Aime Albert, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). With Lawrence Manufacturing 
Company, Lowell, Mass. 


89 

Savery, James Bryan, II, ’23 (D). Assistant Sales Manager, Philgas Company, 
Windsor, Conn. 

Sawyer, Henry Severance, VI, ’32 (B.T.E.). With Sawyer, Regan Company, 
Dalton, Mass. 

Sawyer, Richard Morey, VI, ’27 (B.T.E.). (M.S., 1929, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology.) Cost Engineer, Firestone Cotton Mills, New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Scanlon, Andrew Augustine, IV, *26 (B.T.C.). 

Schaetzel, Andre Paul, IV, ’21 (B.T.C.) . Chemist, Associated Dyeing & Print- 
ing Corporation, Paterson, N. J. 

Schneiderman, Jacob, III, ’27 (D). Golf Professional, Flagler Golf and Country 
Club, Hotel Flagler, Fallsburg, N. Y. 

Schreiter, Ehrich Ernest Max, VI, ’26 (B.T.E.). Assistant to New England 
Industrial Manager, Tide Water Oil Company, Boston, Mass. 

Schwarz, Herman Louis, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, Sandoz Chemical 
Works, Inc., 61 Van Dam Street, New York City. 

Scott, Gordon Maxwell, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). 

Shaber, Hyman Jesse, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.) (M.B.A., 1922, Harvard University.) 
With Spencer Chain Stores, Boston, Mass. 

Shah, Shantilal Hiralal, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Student, Harvard Business School, 
Boston, Mass. 

Shanahan, James Edward, II, ’22 (D). Manager, Hygeia Ice & Coal Company, 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Shananquet, Mrs. Lee (Woodies, Ida A.), Illb, ’00 (C). 801 Bridge Street, 
Charlevoix, Mich. 

Shapiro, Simon, VI, ’34 (B.T.C.). Testing Laboratory, Gotham Silk Hosiery 
Company, Wharton, N. J. 

Shea, Francis James, II, ’12 (D). 98 Pine Street, Florence, Mass. 

Shea, John Francis, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Demonstrator, Buffalo Electro-Chemical 
Co., Inc., 207 A Street, Boston, Mass. 

Shedd, Jackson Ambrose, III, ’28 (D). Designer, S. Stroock & Co., Newburgh, 
N. Y. 

Shelton, Charles Leopold, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Assistant to Merchandising Man- 
ager, Mohawk Carpet Mills, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Shenker, Nahman, III, ’25 (D). 

Sidebottom, Leon William, IV, ’ll (D). Chemist, Boston Blacking & Chemical 
Company, East Cambridge, Mass. 

Sjostrom, Carl Gustof Verner, Jr., Ill, ’17 (D). Production Manager, Glaston- 
bury Knitting Mills, Addison, Conn. 

Slamin, Alfred Francis, I, ’26 (D). Representative, Benjamin Franklin Paint 
Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sleeper, Robert Reid, IV, ’00 (D). Textile Chemist, Calco Chemical Company, 
Bound Brook, N. J. 

Smith, Allen Batterman, I, ’26 (D). Head of Mill Department, Turner Halsey 
Company, 74 Leonard Street, New York City. 

Smith, Doane White, II, ’10 (D). 15 Oakland Street, Natick, Mass. 

Smith, Frank Kenfield, II, ’24 (D). Designer and Technician, Grout’s, Ltd., St. 
Catharines, Ont. 

Smith, Harold, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.) . Dyer and Chemist, Suffolk Knitting Company, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Smith, Herbert Jeffers, VI, ’22 (B.T.E.) . Overseer of Spinning, Potter Fine 
Spinners, Inc., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Smith, Ralston Fox, I, ’04 (C). Sales Manager, W. H. Warner & Co., 1708 Union 
Trust Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Smith, Roger Dennis, II, ’27 (D). Assistant Superintendent, M. T. Stevens & 
Sons Co., (Pentucket Mills), Haverhill, Mass. 

Smith, Theophilus Gilman, Jr., IV, ’10 (D). Farming, Groton, Mass. 

Smith, William Charles, IV, ’26 (B.T.C.). Chadwicks, N. Y. 

Snelling, Fred Newman, II, ’03 (D). With the American Railway Express 
Company, Haverhill, Mass. 

Sokolsky, Henry, VI, ’17 (B.T.E.). Time Study Supervisor, B. F. Sturtevant 
Company, Hyde Park, Mass. 


90 

Somers, Benjamin, II, ’25 (D). 128 Pleasant Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Southwick, Charles Hudson, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Assistant Dyer, Slatersville 
Finishing Company, Slatersville, R. I. 

Spalding, Arthur Ovila, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 84 D Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Spiegel, Edward, II, ’03 (C). 

Stacey, Alfred Charles, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Shoe Lace Company, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Standish, John Carver, IV, ’ll (D). Superintendent, Albany Felt Company, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Stanley, John Prince, Jr., IV, *29 (B.T.C.). Chemist and Overseer of Bleach- 
ing, Certified Laboratories, Inc., Austin, Texas. 

Stass, John George, II, ’27 (D). Textile Engineer, United States Testing Com- 
pany, Inc., 1415 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. 

Stearns, Kenneth Lawrence, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.)* Silk Finishing Department, 
Arnold Print Works, North Adams, Mass. 

Steele, Everette Vernon, IV, ’24 (B.T.C.). Purchasing Agent, Rohm & Haas 
Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stephens, Arnold George, I, *29 (D). Sales Service, Liberty Typewriter, 
Boston, Mass. 

Stevens, Dexter, I, *04 (D). With the Esmond Mills, Esmond, R. I. 

Stevens, Raymond Russell, IV, ’19 (B.T.C.). Chief Chemist, The Felters 
Company, Inc., Millbury, Mass. 

Stevens, William Edwin, I, ’34 (D). With B. B. & R. Knight Corporation, 
(Royal Mill), River Point, R. I. 

Stevenson, Murray Reid, III, ’03 (C). 

Stewart, Alexander, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). Inspector of Textiles, Quartermaster’s 
Depot, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stewart, Arthur Andrew, II, *00 (D). Professor of Textiles; in charge of Fin- 
ishing Department, Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Stewart, John Weeden, IV, *30 (B.T.C.). Textile Chemist, General Dyestuff 
Corporation, 230 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Stewart, Walter Lawrence, III, ’03 (D). 

Stiegler, Harold Winfred, IV, ’18 (B.T.C.). (M.S., 1922, Ph.D., 1924, North- 
western University.) Chemist, Specialty Products Company, Jersey City, 
N. J. 

Stohn, Alexander Charles, III, *06 (C). General Superintendent, Carl Stohn, 
Inc., Hyde Park, Mass. 

Stone, Ira Aaron, IV, ’09 (D). Vice-President, Royal Manufacturing Company, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Storer, Francis Everett, II, *07 (D). Meredith, N. H. 

Storey, Alvin Briggs, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Assistant Textile Superintendent, 
Celanese Corporation of America, Cumberland, Md. 

Stott, John Smith, III, *28 (D). 10 Robinson Court, North Andover, Mass. 

Stronach, Irving Nichols, IV, ’10 (D). Superintendent, Hampton Company, 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Strout, Kenneth Edward, III, *28. (D). Designer, American Mills Company, 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Sturtevant, Albert William, IV, *17 (D). Automobile Mechanic, Lowell Motor 
Sales, Inc., Lowell, Mass. 

Sturtevant, Fred William, IV, *26 (B.T.C.). Chemist and Technologist, 
Better Fabrics Testing Bureau, 225 West 34th Street, New York City. 

Suhlke, Waldo Eric, IV, *20 (B.T.C.). Teacher, Jefferson Junior High School, 
Meriden, Conn. 

Sullivan, John David, VI, *12 (D) . With Robert Gair Company, Bradford, Mass. 

Sullivan, Lambert William, II, ’23 (D). With Southwell Wool Combing 
Company (Silesia Mills), North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Sullivan, Willard David, II, ’23 (D). 39 Loring Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Sunbury, Herbert Ellsworth, VI, *18 (B.T.E.). Mill Superintendent, Allbestos 
Corporation, 21st & Godfrey Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sutcliffe, Henry Mundell, II, *25 (D). Overseer, Uxbridge Worsted Company 
(Granite Mills), Pascoag, R. I. 


91 

Sutton, Leslie Emans, I, ’17 (D). Superintendent, Anniston Cordage Company, 
Anniston, Ala. 

Swain, Harry LeRoy, Jr., I, ’26 (D). Manager, Testing Laboratories, Firestone 
Cotton Mills, New Bedford, Mass. 

Swan, Guy Carleton, II, ’06 (D). Chief Chemist, New York Food and Drug 
Inspection Station, 201 Yarick Street, New York City. 

Swanson, John Harold, I, ’28 (D). Designer, Georgia Kincaid Mills, Experi- 
ment, Ga. 

Sweeney, George Hamilton, II, ’24 (D). Salesman, Walker, Stetson Company, 
157 Essex Street, Boston, Mass. 

Swift, Edward Spooner, S. J., I, ’02 (D). Clergyman, Church of the Immacu- 
late Conception, Boston, Mass. 

Syme, James Francis, II, ’00 (D). Industrial Management, 27 Linnaean Street, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Symmes, Dean Whiting, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.) Salesman and Demonstrator, Na- 
tional Aniline and Chemical Company, 150 Causeway Street, Boston, Mass. 

Tamulonis, Edward William, VI, ’30 (B.T.E.). Second Hand, Newmarket 
Manufacturing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Tang, Hsiung-Yuan, I, ’30 (D). Assistant Manager, Sung Sing Cotton Mill, 
No. 3, Wusih, Kiangsu, China. 

Tarpey, Thomas Joseph,* IV, ’27 (B.T.C.)* Chemist, National Aniline and 
Chemical Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Tarshis, Elias Aaron, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.) . Head Dyer, Pohatcong Hosiery Mills, 
Washington, N. J. 

Teague, Charles Baird, II, ’26 (D). Civil Engineer, Highway Division, Massa- 
chusetts Public Works Department, Boston, Mass. 

Thaxter, Joseph Blake, Jr., II, ’12 (D). Vice-President, Ludlow Sales Corpora- 
tion, 80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Thomas, Benjamin, Jr., VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). In charge of testing and research, 
Jackson Mills, Nashua, N. H. 

Thomas, Robert Joseph, IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Chemist, The Apponaug Company, 
Apponaug, R. I. 

Thomas, Roland Vincent, I, ’05 (C). With Chicopee Sales Corporation, 40 
Worth Street, New York City. 

Thompson, Arthur Robert, Jr., IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Ciba Company, 
Inc., Greensboro, N. C. 

Thompson, Everett Leander, I, ’05 (D). Salesman, Tropical Paint and Oil Co., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Thompson, Henry James, IV, ’00 (D). 15 Greenleaf Street, Malden, Mass. 

Todd, Walter Ernest, III, ’23 (D). Superintendent, Stanley Woolen Company, 
Uxbridge, Mass. 

Toepler, Carl, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Bellman Brook Bleachery Company, 
Fairview, N. J. 

Toher, Francis Luke, IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). 58 Concord Street, Providence, R. I. 

Topjian, Leon, IV, ’30 (B.T.C.). 

Toshach, Reginald Alexander, II, ’ll (D). Manager, Toshach’s Mill Rem- 
nants, Haverhill, Mass. 

Toupin, Stephane Frederick, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). 

True, William Clifford, II, ’22 (D). Industrial Engineer, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 
Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Turcotte, David Henry, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 523 Fletcher Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Tyler, Lauriston Whitcombe, II, ’16 (D). Manager, W. T. Grant Company, 
Portsmouth, N. H. 

Valentine, Burnet, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Department Manager, Pepperell Manu- 
facturing Company, 40 Worth Street, New York City. 

Varnum, Arthur Clayton, II, ’06 (D). Superintendent, Troy Blanket Mills. 
Troy, N. H. 

Villa, Luis Jorge, IV, ’25 (B.T.C.). Automobile Dealer, Hijos de Vicente, B. 
Villa & Co., Medellin, Colombia, S. A. 


92 

Villa, William Horace, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Compania Colom- 
biana de Tejidos, Medellin, Colombia, S. A. 

Villeneuve, Maurice Arthur, II, ’26 (D). With Killingly Worsted Mills, Daniel- 
son, Conn. 

Vincent, William Henry, III, ’26 (D). 


Walen, Ernest Dean, VI, ’14 (B.T.E.). General Manager, Pacific Mills (Worsted 
Division), Lawrence, Mass. 

Walker, Alfred Schuyler, II, ’ll (D). 67 Park Avenue, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Walker, Anna Gertrude, Illb, ’03 (C). See Pradel, Mrs. Alois J. 

Walker, Raymond Scott, II, ’23 (D). Engineer, Wood Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Walker, Samuel J., IV, ’32 (B.T.C.). Cleaner and dyer, Merrivale Dry Clean- 
ing Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Wallace, Joseph Max, IV, ’31 (B.T.C.). 

Wang, Chen, IV, ’23 (B. T. C.). 

Wang, Cho, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Wang, Tung Chuan, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 

Wang, Yun-Cheng, VI, ’31 (B.T.E.). Assistant Manager, Sung Sing Cotton 
Mill No. 1, Shanghai, China. 

Wang, Yung Chi, II, ’21 (D). Factory Manager, Ching Yuen Silk Mill, Shanghai, 
China. 

Ward, George Chester, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Research Chemist, Celanese Corpora- 
tion of America, Cumberland, Md. 

Warren, E. Maybelle, IV, ’28 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Hub Hosiery Company, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Warren, Philip Hamilton, II, ’05 (D). Superintendent, Hopeville Manufactur- 
ing Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Washburn, John Milton, Jr., IV, ’21 (B.T.C.). Salesman, Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet Company, Boston, Mass. 

Watson, William, III, ’ll (D). Real Estate, 50-54 Merrimack Street, Haver- 
hill, Mass. 

Webber, Arthur Hammond, IV, ’01 (D). Chemist and Colorist, L. B. South- 
wick & Co., Peabody, Mass. 

Webster, Joseph Albert, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Superintendent, Cloth Division, 
Aberfoyle Manufacturing Company, Chester, Pa. 

Weinstein, Edward Joseph, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). Harrison Hardware Company, 
Harrison, N. Y. 

Wells, Ai Edwin, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, 
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell, Mass. 

Wells, Henry Alfred, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Chemist and Color Mixer, Warwick 
Print Works, Inc., Bound Brook, N. J. 

Westaway, John Chester, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, W. J. Westaw r ay 
Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Westbrooke, Clayton Collington, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Bigelow-Sanford 
Carpet Company, Thompsonville, Conn. 

Wetherbee, Francis Putney, I, ’28 (D). Plant Manager, Flint River Cotton 
Mills, Albany, Ga. 

Wheaton, Walter Francis, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). Owner of Stationery Department, 
Genung & Leeney, Inc., White Plains, N. Y. 

Wheelock, Stanley Herbert, II, ’05 (D). President and Treasurer, Stanley 
Woolen Company, Uxbridge, Mass. 

Whitcomb, Roscoe Myron, IV, ’10 (D). Pharmacist, R. M. Whitcomb, Ash- 
land, N. H. 

White, Royal Phillip, II, ’04 (D). Agent, Stirling Mills, Lowell, Mass. 

Whitehill, Warren Hall, IV, ’12 (D). Textile Chemist, Talbot Mills, North 
Billerica, Mass. 

Wiech, Raymond Edward, IV, ’29 (B.T.C.). 

Wightman, William Henry, IV, ’06 (D). Salesman, Ciba Company, Inc., 
157 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Wilcox, Leonard Edward, VI, ’24 (B.T.E.). 49 Varnum Avenue, Lowell, Mass. 


93 

Wilkie, Robert Campbell, VI, ’34 (B.T.E.). Operating Engineer, Frosted Wool 
Process Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Williams, Albert William, III, ’32 (D). Designer, Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Williamson, Douglas Franklin, I, ’22 (D). Superintendent, The Linen Thread 
Company, Inc., Blue Mountain, Ala. 

Wilman, Rodney Bernhardt, II, ’25 (D). Superintendent, New England Fibre 
Blanket Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Wing, Charles True, III, ’02 (D). Paymaster, Merrimack Woolen Corporation, 
Dracut, Mass. 

Wingate, Edward Lawrence, Jr., VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Service Manager, Russell 
Manufacturing Company, Middletown, Conn. 

Wingate, William Henry, IV, ’08 (D), Superintendent, Hodges Finishing Com- 
pany, Dedham, Mass. 

Wise, Paul Tower, II, ’01 (D). Vice-President, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 1155 Man- 
hattan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wojas, Stanley Edward, IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). Assistant Chemist, Massachusetts 
Mohair Plush Company, Lowell, Mass. 

Woo, Tsunkwei, VI, T9 (B.T.E.). 

Wood, Ernest Hadley, S.B., IV, ’ll (D). 

Wood, James Carleton, IV, ’09 (D). Sales Representative, R. T. Vanderbilt 
Company, New York City. 

Wood, Lawrence Burnham, IV, ’17 (B.T.C.). Chemist, Pacific Print Works, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Woodbury, Kenneth Leroy, VI, ’28 (B.T.E.). Production Engineer, Sidney 
Blumenthal Company, Shelton, Conn. 

Woodcock, Eugene Close, II, ’07 (D). Mill Agent, Chelsea Fibre Mills, 1155 
Manhattan Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Woodhead, Joseph Arthur, VI, ’23 (B.T.E.). 924-18th Street, Union City, N. J. 

Woodies, Ida Alberta, Illb, ’00 (C). See Shananquet, Mrs. Lee. 

Woodman, Harry Lincoln, I, ’02 (C). Assistant Superintendent, Construction, 
Merrimac Chemical Company, Woburn, Mass. 

Woodruff, Charles Beauregard, I, ’06 (C). 

Worthen, Clifford Tasker, IV, ’22 (B.T.C.). Overseer, Dyeing and Bleaching, 
McLoughlin Textile Corporation, 203 Park Avenue, Utica, N. Y. 

Wotkowicz, Michael Joseph, VI, ’20 (B.T.E.). 

Wright, Edward, II, ’05 (C). Sanitary Engineer, Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health, 141 State House, Boston, Mass. 

Wu, Clarence Wen-Lon, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). 

Wu, Tsung-Chieh, VI, ’25 (B.T.E.). 

Wynn, William Joseph, Jr., IV, ’34 (B.T.C.). Dyer, U. S. Finishing Company, 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

Yavner, Harry, II, ’12 (D). Merchant, Mayo’s Hardware Company, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Young, Edmund Joseph, Jr., IV, ’33 (B.T.C.). 545 School Street, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Yung, E-Zung, I, ’32 (D). Assistant Manager, Sung Sing Cotton Mill No. 3, 
Wusih, Kiangsu, China. 

Zalkind, Benjamin Joseph, VI, ’29 (B.T.E.). Textile Engineer, Saco-Lowell 
Shops, Biddeford, Me. 

Ziock, LeRoy, II, ’25 (D). Vice-President and Superintendent, Ziock’s Indus- 
tries, Inc., Rockford, 111. 

Zisman, Louis Samuel, IV, ’20 (B.T.C.). Head of Dyeing Department and 
Chief Chemist, Gotham Silk Hosiery Company, Inc., 580 First Avenue, New 
York City. 





LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

THIS SHOULD BE FILLED OUT AND SENT TO THE REGISTRAR 


Date 


Name in Full 

Date and Place of Birth 

Home Address j City or Town State 

Street and Number 


INDICATE COURSE DESIRED 

DEGREE COURSES DIPLOMA COURSES 

IV. Chemistry and Textile Coloring I. Cotton Manufacturing 

VI. Textile Engineering II. Wool Manufacturing 

1. General Course III. Textile Design 

2. Cotton Option 

3. Wool Option 

4. Design Option 

5. Sales Option 


Graduate of High School, Year 193 

Other High or Preparatory Schools attended 

If you have done collegiate work, give name and address of college or 
university 193 .. . — 193... 


Signature 

Signatures of 

Parents or 

Guardian 

Citizen of 

City or Town State 



SERIES 38, No. 4 


M ay, 1935 


BULLETIN 

OF THE 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1935 


Entered August 26, 1912, at Lowell, Mass., as Second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

A .eptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized on August 15, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication op this Document Approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2500— 6-’35. Order 4698. 


2 


FROSTED WOOL* 

Research in Refrigeration Applied to Removal of Raw-stock Impurities 
B y Edgar H. Baker, Professor of Textiles 

“Frosted Wool” is the name given to the newly discovered process which 
eliminates substantial and worthwhile amounts of grass, burrs, seeds, chaff, 
shive, pitch, tar, paint, grease, and earth impurities from sorted grease wool 
(sheared or pulled) and other similar animal fibers. The process is based on 
the established fact that the natural oily grease with which wool and similar 
animal fibers are lubricated by nature during growth will congeal and become 
solid at certain temperatures below zero, Fahrenheit. 

In this congealed or frozen state the wool grease is dry, hard, and brittle, 
and not greasy or sticky, and is shattered to dust by mechanical agitation. 
The frozen fibers can then separate one from the other and permit the 
vegetable matter to be thrown out through the screen of a duster. The oil 
in oil-branding paints will also freeze and, when frozen, will make the paint 
brittle or friable. When in this state the paint acts very much like the frozen 
grease and can easily be shattered and eliminated by mechanical agitation. 

It is well known to wool men that wool fiber in the grease is not damaged 
by being subjected for long periods of time to subnormal temperatures. It is 
also a matter of common knowledge that clean wool, or any clean-wool product, 
is not damaged by freezing. 

The problem of freeing sorted wool and other similar fibers, while in the 
grease, from the natural impurities produced by the animals themselves has 
always been easily solved. 

Neither the scouring nor the naphtha process, however, will eliminate the 
vegetable matter, or the pitch, tar, or paint, if any or all of these unnatural 
impurities are present. Paint or tar used for branding the animals can be 
clipped from the paint sort made by the sorter — a method which is expensive, 
wasteful, and never entirely successful. Depainting and depitching can be 
done on the scoured wool or noils by passage through a bath containing a 
suitable solvent; but the process, while effective, is very expensive. Vegetable 
matter can be substantially eliminated from wools, noils, or fabrics, by car- 
bonizing; but this method is expensive and harmful to the product, and 
wherever used is acknowledged to be a necessary evil. Depainting, depitching, 
and carbonizing are chemical processes which require elaborate and expensive 
equipment with high maintenance charges. 

Burr-picking machines are commonly used for removing vegetable matter 
from woolen wools; and burring devices, such as burr guards, Morrel rolls, 
and Harmel rolls, are commonly used on worsted cards for removing vege- 
table matter from combing wools. But the fiber is damaged by all such de- 
vices; and the by-products produced contain excessive amounts of vegetable 
matter mixed with fiber, which must be eventually removed. 

That the burring devices on worsted cards do not entirely eliminate vege- 
table matter is very evident from a casual examination of the card sliver. 
That there is nothing on any backwasher or gill box to remove vegetable 
matter is evident from examination of the material entering the combs. That 
all the vegetable matter in the material entering the combs, such as the Noble, 
Holden, French, Lister, and hybrid combs is not transferred to the noil is 
evident from the age-old custom of counting and reporting the number of 
pieces of vegetable matter, as well as neps, in 5 yards of finished top as a 
measure of quality of the combing, with definite standards and tolerances as 
to what constitutes a good delivery. That the vegetable matter in top does 
not all fall out, or is not thrown out, in drawing and spinning, or in any of 


♦Reprint by courtesy of Textile World. 


3 


th- subsequent processes in worsted-fabric manufacture, is the sole reason 
for the expensive hand-specking, speck-dyeing, carbonizing, or penciling in 
the pb'ce Some noils and recombing noils may be free enough to be used in 
certain woolen fabrics or products, but too often they require carbonizing 
and depainting. 

The modern burr picker for woolen wools breaks the fiber and does not 
remove all the vegetable matter. An examination of the card strippings, 
droppings, and burr waste from woolen cards and the yarn from mules and 
frames proves this. Worsted wools are never burr-picked because of the in- 
creased noilage produced. 

A small amount of vegetable matter is permissible in some woolen fabrics; 
but its discernible presence is prohibited in the majority of fabrics, which 
must be hand-specked, speck-dyed, penciled, or carbonized to conceal or re- 
move it. Vegetable matter can be hidden or disguised by speck-dyeing, which 
can be used on piece dyes only, and this concealment is a subterfuge and a 
mild form of fraud; or it can be painfully and patiently picked out of the 
finished fabric by hand, piece by piece, which is the most costly of all 
methods. The fact that hand-specking is done at all is proof of the lack of 
success of any of the other existing methods of removing vegetable matter. 

The logical place to eliminate vegetable matter, paint, or tar is at the be- 
ginning and not at the end of the many processes of manufacturing woolen 
and worsted products. 

Whether the sheep are range, barn, paddock, or pasture fed, the wool will 
contain vegetable matter, although the amount and character may vary ex- 
tremely. Naturally vegetable matter differs in different countries and differ- 
ent parts of the same country. In general, however, it may be divided into 
grasses, seeds, parts of seeds, weeds, and burrs. 

Some of the burr-bearing plants have excellent food value for sheep but 
from a manufacturer’s standpoint they are all pests. 

The ordinary cockle burr and the bean burr are hard and easily removed 
when few in number, but they are a menace to the wool grower and greatly 
detract from the value of the wool when they literally plaster the whole 
fleece. The spiny cockle burr, yellow-star thistle burr, horehound burr, star 
burr, sand burr, trefoil burr, and burr clover (mestiza or spiral burr*) are 
all pests, particularly the trefoil and mestiza. Wire grass, corkscrew grass, 
pip-gut or broncho grass, foxtail or squirreltail grass, the filarees (blue 
stem and red stem), and beggar lice, when present, automatically throw the 
wool down into the defective class. 

The spiral or mestiza burr has been called the sheepman’s best friend and 
worst enemy. It is the seed of the burr clover plant which will thrive and 
multiply on land on which practically nothing else will grow. It has a very 
high food value, and the sheep relish it. During the dry season the plants 
dry up and blow away, leaving the ground covered with the tiny burrs which 
the sheep eat. The presence in wool of the burrs is an absolute bane, as they 
will uncoil and straighten out in processing and appear in the ultimate fabric 
as an integral part of the yarn. 

Alarmingly increasing amounts of splendid wool contaminated with these 
burrs come from California, Arizona, Texas, and other Southwestern States in 
the United States of America, South America, South Africa, and Australasia. 
Some of the foreign wools are so burry that they are rarely imported into 
the United States, being sold to manufacturers in Bradford (England), 
France, and Belgium, who are skilled in reclaiming the fiber. 

Range sheep in some of our Northwestern States, like the Dakotas, Mon- 
tana, and Wyoming, spend their whole life in the open, exposed to the elements 
and prolonged temperatures ranging from 120° F. in summer to 60° below 


4 


zero in winter. The annual clip from these four States averages more than 
80 million pounds of which, several million pounds are frequently stored 
in unheated barns and sheds for one or more years, because of no market, 
or in anticipation of a more favorable one before being shipped to the Eastern 
wool merchants. There is no evidence of damage to the wool by these repeated 
freezings and thawings, either while on the sheep’s back or in storage. Some 
of the stored fleeces may be damaged by moths or other vermin, but not by 
freezing, as the wool fiber itself cannot be frozen and extreme low tempera- 
tures have no effect on its physical structure or chemical composition. 

This fact has been verified and checked by one of America’s outstanding 
microscopists who has examined the cells in the inside and the scales on the 
outside of many fibers subjected to the Frosted Wool Process and has com- 
pared these fibers with untreated fibers. As the result of his examination, he 
has certified to the fact that the Frosted Wool Process produces no change 
in the physical structure of the fiber. 

While the process does not remove all the grease, vegetable, or other 
foreign matter from grease wool and must in most cases be followed by scour- 
ing, degreasing, and washing, to produce commercially clean wool, it does 
eliminate before beginning the usual mechanical processing from 30 to 90% 
of the total normal shrinkage of the grease wool, which includes from 60 
to 94% of the vegetable matter (Figs. 1, 2, and 3) and from 30 to 70% of 
the grease (Fig. 4). 

Frosted grease wool after being scoured has a much better color than the 
ordinary scoured wool; and naturally the top, noil, yarn, and fabrics have 
better color. Wool which is normally cream or yellow white becomes a blue 
white and in many cases appears to have been bleached or blued. This change 
in color is not a chemical one, but is due wholly to the fact that the outside 
of the fiber has been freed of grease and filth and does not retain the stain 
which is present in the ordinary scouring liquors. 

The principle of the process is very simple. The machinery is not com- 
plicated and consists of any standard refrigerating unit and a refrigerating 
room containing all the cleaning machinery (Fig. 5). 

The refrigerating machine has a rated capacity of approximately 27 tons, 
which will produce and maintain an air temperature of about 35° below zero 
F., while the full load of from 1,000 to 1,500 pounds of wool per hour is 
being processed. 

The refrigerating room (Fig. 5) is an inclosure 40 feet long by 12 feet 
wide and 12 feet high, with walls, ceiling, and floor of 9-inch cork. The equip- 
ment has been designed in such a way that, if desired, it can be installed in 
place of the first scouring bowl of a scouring train. 

The grease wool is elevated and fed by a standard feeder to the top of the 
cold chamber, where it enters through a pair of sealing rolls, which exclude 
the warm air. The wool drops onto the freezing conveyor, which is 20 feet 
long, with coils above carrying the refrigerant and fans below for circulating 
the air through the coils and the wool. The wool remains on the freezing con- 
veyor for a period of from 3 to 7 minutes. 

At the end of the conveyor the wool drops onto the feed sheet of a specially 
designed and constructed intermittent batch duster (cleaning machine), in 
which it remains for a few seconds. The frozen foreign matter is thrown out 
of the wool through screens in the duster and is carried away and discharged 
from the room by a continuously operating conveying system. The cleaned 
fiber is intermittently discharged from the duster and taken away by a con- 
denser, which drops the wool into sealing rolls through which it is discharged 
from the cold room without the loss of cold air. This duster cannot and will 
not roll or knot the wool. 


5 


The screens do not become clogged with grease or fiber, due to the dry 
state of the materials at this low temperature. 

No operator is required in the freezing chamber during the processing, as 
the machines are synchronized and equipped with automatic stop motions. 
The period of treatment in the cleaning machine, which is determined by the 
character and quantity of vegetable matter and other impurities, the charac- 
ter of the wool, and the results sought, can be instantly changed by a control 
located in any desired place outside of the chamber. 

The material emerging from the Frosted Wool Process is dry and can be 
immediately scoured, bagged, stored, or shipped as if it were greasy or clean 
wool. 

The process has not yet been commercialized . for the treatment of noils, 
burr waste, or scoured wool. 

As originally conceived, the Frosted Wool Process was expected to remove 
vegetable matter from scoured defective wools, while in the wet state; but as 
developed, the same final objective has been reached by treating the original 
grease wool, rather than scoured wool. The treatment of grease wool has 
the added advantage of removing, in addition to vegetable matter, substantial 
amounts of other foreign matters, such as grease, paint, pitch, tar, and earth 
impurities from the wool before it enters the scouring bowls or degreasing 
and washing plant; thus enlarging the scope of the process to make it ap- 
plicable not only to defective wools, but also to all so-called free wools and 
wools which require special treatment before they can be scoured, such as 
cotted fleeces, cotts, etc. 

The development and perfection of the Frosted Wool Process (a trade 
name) has been carried out at the Lowell Textile Institute during the last 
three years. The work has involved the use of the research facilities of the 
Institute in developing the machinery and in determining the effect of the 
Frosted Wool Process on all the physical properties of wools. A full com- 
mercial-size Frosted Wool cleaning unit, having a capacity of from 1,000 to 
1,500 pounds of grease wool per hour, was installed in the Institute last 
year and is now in operation. 

During the last year about 500,000 pounds of grease wool, containing vari- 
ous kinds and amounts of vegetable matter in grades ranging from carpet to 
72s cape, in lots of from a few bags to 20,000 pounds, have been treated by 
the Frosted Wool Process in this unit and returned to the mills for converting 
into clean wool, top, yarn, woolen and worsted fabrics and hardened felt. 

In practically all cases duplicate lots of wool were kept by the mills and 
processed in the usual manner for the purpose of developing comparative data. 
Careful records were kept of general quality, yi’elds, shrinkages, amounts, and 
values of products and by-products, strengths, staple length, vegetable matter, 
dyeing quality, handle, color, costs, economies, etc. Several examples of these 
data are given in the table on Page 6. 

The total operating cost of the Frosted Wool Process including deprecia- 
tion but not including royalty, is less than one-half of a cent per pound on 
the weight of the wool to be processed. 

From the very complete line of samples and results received from the mills 
covering these tests, and the exhaustive data and samples accumulated dur- 
ing the thousands of tests made in developing the Frosted Wool Process, the 
following advantages have been and can be demonstrated: 

1. In the final analysis, from grease wool to finished fabric, using free 
wool, defective wool, or off sorts, alone or in combination the question of the 
use of the Frosted Wool Process as compared with the usual method of pro- 
cessing, is solely one of economic balance, with the difference very positively 
in favor of the Frosted Wool Process. 


6 


2. In scouring alone, the amount of water, soap, alkali (if used), steam, 
time required, and pollution of the scouring liquor is materially reduced. In 
the case of some carpet wools so much grease and foreign matter are removed 
that the scouring process can actually be omitted. 

3. All noils have increased in value due to the lessened vegetable, paint, 
and other foreign-matter content, and most of them can be used for woolen 
woven products and hardened felts without carbonizing. 

4. All tops have the vegetable-matter count materially reduced, in some 
cases almost to the vanishing point. 

5. All top and noil have better color and feel, and top has more bloom. 

6. All yarns, both worsted and woolen, show greater elongation before 
reaching the breaking point 

7. Yarns made from Frosted Wools show greater uniformity in breaking 
strength, with less variation between the maximum and minimum breaks, 
than regular yarns made from the same wools. 

8. Some wools, yarns, and fabrics show deeper color when dyed, with the 
same amount of dyes and chemicals. 

9. Specking is reduced or eliminated; and speck-dyeing is used only to 
cover cotton or artificial silk picked up in processing, if used at all. 

10. The felting or fulling property of the wool is not affected by the process. 

11. The pollution of streams from waste-scouring liquors is reduced. 

12. There are intangible savings in maintenance of scouring, carding, 
combing, and spinning machinery and in general processing. 

13. Low-priced defective wools are converted into equal or better than free 
wools as far as vegetable matter is concerned at low cost and with little or no 
damage to the fiber. 

14. The process is equally applicable to wools for the woolen, worsted, felt, 
and carpet industries. 

Comparative Results of Regular Wool Treatment and Frosted Wool 
Treatment of Identical Lots of Wool. 



62s 

Blend 

56s Blend 

% Blood 


Untreated 

Frosted 

Untreated Frosted 

Untreated Frosted 


Vo 

Vo 

% 

Vo 

Vo 

Vo 

Grease Wool 


100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

Vegetable Matter 


.66 

.88 

.88 

2.13 

2.13 

Wool after Frosting 

. — 

71.40 

— 

70.50 



79.00 

Vegetable Matter in Frosted Wool. . 

. — 

.25 

— 

.14 

— 

.62 

Carding 







Waste Dusted 


.71 

.84 

.67 

1.96 

1.94 

Strips Dusted 

.30 

.27 

— 

— 

.27 

.26 

Burr Dusted 


.60 

.55 

.55 

.89 

.84 

Comb Bits 


.03 

— 

— 

.61 

.54 

Total Waste 

1.54 

1.61 

1.39 

1.22 

3.73 

3.58 

Noils on Gr. Wt 


5.01 

3.20 

4.07 

6.70 

6.50 

Top on Gr. Wt 


29.32 

40.89 

40.28 

40.20 

41.00 

Total Usable Fiber 


35.94 

45.48 

45.57 

50.63 

51.08 

Vegetable Matter in 5 Yd. Top . . . 

. 66 Pcs. 

18 Pcs. 

92 Pcs. 

15 Pcs. 

137 Pcs. 

49 Pcs. 


Note: Practically all pieces of vegetable matter in treated top are less than 3/16" long. 


7 



7Ea 64s 62s yesBloocl * Blood Low Low BA 


Grade of Wool 

FI6.1 -Vegetable Matter in Typical Wools Before and After Treating by Frosted 
Wool Process 


w 6 


4- ^ 

sZ 

as: 
e u> 

8>f 


cv 
c c 

-4- © 

g-o 

cfS 


5 

4 

3 

2 

1 

0 


A - Vegetable matter in grease wool 

B -Vegetable matter remaining in finished top — 
{0.05 °]o) and noil (1.16*7*) ratio of vegetable 
matter in fop to noil - 4. Z°]o 

FA- Vegetable matter in same grease wool 
after treatment by freezing process 

FB - Vegetable matter remaining in finished 

top(0.00Z°Jo) anol no/ 1 (0.20 °Jo) from same 
wool treated by freezing process. 

Ratio of vegetable matter in top to noil-l.5% 



A 


B 


FA 


FB 


FIG. 2 - Effectiveness of Removing Vegetable Matter by Freezing Process 



FIG. 3* Number of Pieces in 5 yd. of Top from 3 / g s Domestic Wool 


8 




SERIES 39. NO. 1. 


August t 1935 


BULLETIN 

of the 


Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1935-1936 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


DEPARTMENT 

OF 

LOWELL EVENING TEXTILE SCHOOL 




.. 


Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2M. 8-'35. Order 5226. 


TRUSTEES OF THE LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 
Officers. 

ROYAL P. WHITE, CHARLES H. EAMES, 

Chairman Clerk . 

Trustees 

On the Part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Dr. Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education. 

On the Part of the City of Lowell. 

Hon. James J. Bruin, Mayor of Lowell. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1936. 

Royal P. White, Lowell, Agent, Stirling Mills, class of 1904. 

Edward B. Wentworth, 165 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Philip S. Marden, Lowell, Editor-in-chief, Courier-Citizen. 

Charles W. Churchill, Lowell, Manager, Churchill Manufacturing Company, 
Inc., class of 1906. 

Tracy A. Adams, North Adams, Vice-President and General Manager, Arnold 
Print Works, class of 1911. 

For Term Ending June 30, 1937. 

Thomas T. Clark, North Billerica, Treasurer, Talbot Mills, class of 1910. 
George M. Harrigan, Lowell, President, Lowell Trust Company. 

Stanley H. Wheelock, Uxbridge, President and Treasurer, Stanley Woolen 
Company, class of 1905. 

Vincent M. McCartin, Lowell, Superintendent of Public Schools. 

John A. Calvin, Lowell, Superintendent of Weaving, United States Bunting 
Company. 


For Term Ending June 30, 1938. 

Edward M. Abbot, Westford, Vice-President and Agent, Abbot Worsted Com- 
pany, class of 1904. 

Mrs. H. L. Boutwell, 209 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Irving Southworth, Andover, Agent, Pacific Mills, Boston Corporation, mills at 
Lawrence. 

Charles J. McCarty, Lowell, Advertising Solicitor, Courier-Citizen and Evening 
Leader. 

John A. Connor, Lowell, Superintendent, John C. Meyer Thread Company. 

LOWELL EVENING TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

By Act of the Legislature of 1928, the name of the Lowell Textile School was 
changed to Lowell Textile Institute, and the evening classes are organized and are 
to be hereafter operated as a department of the Institute to be known as the Lowell 


Evening Textile School. 

CALENDAR. 

September 26, Thursday 

1935. 

Registration. 

October 3, Thursday . 


Registration 

October 7, Monday 


Opening of evening school. 

November 11, Monday 

. 

Armistice Day — Holiday. 

November 28, Thursday 1 
November 29, Friday . ) * 

. 

Thanksgiving recess. No classes. 

December 20, Friday . 

. 

End of first term. 

January 2, Thursday . 

1936. 

Opening of second term. 

March 6, Friday 

. . . 

Closing of evening school 

April 7, Tuesday 

. 

Graduation. 


3 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 


Charles Holmes Eames, S.B Billerica. 

President. 

Louis Atwell Olney, S.B., M.S., ScD. . . .118 Riverside Street. 

Professor of Chemistry; in charge of Department of Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Edgar Harrison Barker 9 Mount Hope Street. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Wool Yams. 

Arthur Andrew Stewart 124 Luce Street. 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Finishing. 

Hermann Henry Bachmann .... 146 Parkview Avenue. 

Professor of Textile Design; in charge of Department of Design and Weaving. 
Lester Howard Cushing, A.B., Ed.M. ... 10 Walden Street. 

Professor of History and Economics; in charge of Department of Languages, 
History and Economics; Secretary of the Faculty. 

Herbert James Ball, S.B., B.C.S. . . . 119 Wentworth Avenue. 

Professor of Textile Engineering; in charge of Department of Textile Engi- 
neering and Accountancy. 

Gilbert Roscoe Merrill, B.T.E. .... 364 Varnum Avenue. 
Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Cotton Yarns and Knitting. 

Stewart Mackay North Chelmsford. 

Assistant Professor of Textile Design. 

John Charles Lowe, B.T.E. . 

Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

Martin John Hoellrich 

Assistant Professor of Weaving. 

Elmer Edward Fickett, B.S 

Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Frederick Steere Beattie, Ph.B.. 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

Harold Canning Chapin, Ph.D 

Assistant Professor of General Chemistry. 

Charles Lincoln Howarth, B.T.C. 

Assistant Professor of Dyeing. 

Percy Charles Judd, B.S 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Harry Chamberlain Brown, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

James Guthrie Dow, A.B 11 Robbins Street. 

Assistant Professor of English. 

Cornelius Leonard Glen ..... R.F.D. No. 1, Lowell. 
Assistant Professor of Finishing. 

A. Edwin Wells, B.T.E. . . 204 Franklin Street, Melrose Highlands. 


161 Dracut Street. 
30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence. 

162 Hovey Street. 
285 Foster Street. 

290 Pine Street. 
North Billerica. 
. 156 Methuen Street. 

272 Merrimack Street. 


Russell Lee Brown, B.T.E. .... 

Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

59 Bradstreet Avenue. 

Charles Harrison Jack ..... 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 

71 Canton Street. 

Ruth Foote, A.B., S.B. 

Instructor and Registrar. 

46 Victoria Street 

Albert Greaves Sugden ..... 
Instructor in Weaving. 

673 School Street. 

Arthur Joseph Woodbury 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

41 Morey Street. 

Russell Metcalf Fox 

Instructor in Textile Design. 

359 Beacon Street. 

Charles Arthur Everett, B.T.C. 

Instructor in Dyeing. 

Chelmsford. 

James Harrington Kennedy, Jr. ... 

Instructor in Wool Yarns and Sorting. 

177 A Street. 

William George Chace, Ph.B 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

7 Sanborn Street. 

John Leslie Merrill, B.T.E. .... 
Instructor in Weaving. 

2026 Middlesex Street. 


4 


John Henry Skinkle, S.B . 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Franz Evron Baker, B.T.E. 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

Charles Frederick Edlund, B.S. 

Instructor in Sales Engineering. 

Milton Hindle, B.T.E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 

Horton Brown, B.S. . 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Elmer Percy Trevors 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Paul David Petterson 

Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 
De Gruchy, James Campbell 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Robert Frederick Jessen . 

Assistant Instructor in Cotton Yarns. 

Emilio Gomez Moreno, Jr. . 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 
Lee Gale Johnston .... 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Walter Ballard Holt 
Bursar. 

Florence Moore Lancey . 

Librarian. 

Helen Gray Flack, S.B. 

Secretary. 

Mona Blanche Palmer 
Clerk. 

Miriam Kaplan Hoffman, S.B. 

Clerk. 

Howard Dexter Smith, Ph.D. 

Evening Instructor in General Chemistry. 
Harold Arthur Giffin 

Evening Instructor in Design. 

Henry Earl McGowan, B.T.E. . 

Evening Instructor in Mathematics. 

Edward W. Dooley .... 

Evening Instructor in Advertising Design. 

V ITTORIA ROSATTO .... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 

J. Raymond Bradley .... 

Evening Instructor in Advertising Design. 
James C. Buzzell .... 

Evening Instructor in Electricity. 

Glen Bowden Caswell, 

Evening Instructor in Machine Shop. 

Bertha C. Hoellrich .... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 

Frederick William Gatenby, 

Evening Instructor in Worsted Yarns. 

Donald L. Hemmenway 

Evening Instructor in Electricity. 

Mildred Damon ..... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 

Inez L. Keller ..... 

Evening Instructor in Art. 

IVAR 0. MoBERG ..... 

Evening Instructor in Weaving. 

Dorothy M. Bliss .... 

Evening Instructor in Design. 


7 Sanborn Street. 
Dalton Road, Chelmsford. 
272 Merrimack Street. 
24 Highland Avenue, Melrose Highlands. 
178 Atlantic Avenue, Marblehead. 

18 Rhodora Street. 


East Chelmsford. 
61 Pleasant Street, Stoneham 
298 Pawtucket Street. 
28 Loring Street. 


Haverhill. 


37 Albert Street. 
46 Victoria Street. 
445 Stevens Street. 
685 Westford Street. 
43 Hawthorn Street 


Dalton Road, Chelmsford. 
785 Stevens Street. 
36 Varney Street. 
799 Chelmsford Street. 
63 Bradstreet Avenue. 
. 29 Paige Street. 
26 Princeton Boulevard. 
32 Hampshire Street. 


30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence. 


Forge Village 
55 Nor cross Street. 
29 Havilah Street. 
8 Orchard Street. 
35 Thirteenth Street. 
Chelmsford. 


EVENING CLASSES 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Entrance Requirements 

All applicants to the evening classes must understand the English language and 
simple arithmetic. Those who are graduates of a grammar or high school are 
admitted upon certificate. Those who cannot present such a certificate are required 
to take examination in the subjects of English and arithmetic. In the examination 
in English a short composition must be written on a given theme, and a certain 
amount must be written from dictation. In the examination in arithmetic the 
applicant must show suitable proficiency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
division, common and decimal fractions, percentage, ratio and proportion. Oppor- 
tunity to register or to take these examinations is offered each year, generally on 
the Thursday evenings of the two weeks previous to the opening of the evening 
school. 

Registration 

Before entering the class a student must fill out an attendance card, which can 
be obtained at the office or from the instructors in the various departments. 

Any student who has filed an attendance card and who wishes to change his 
course must notify the office before making the change. 

Sessions. 

The evening classes commence the first Monday of October and continue for 
twenty weeks. The school is open on four evenings each week during the period 
mentioned, except when the school is closed for holiday recesses. 

Supplies. 

Students must provide their own books, stationery, tools, etc., and pay for any 
breakage or damage that they cause. 

Students’ supplies will be sold from the co-operative store every evening school 
night from 6.45 to 8.15 p.m. 

Fees and Deposits. 

All evening courses are free to residents of Lowell. To those outside of Lowell 
the fee is $10 per year for each course of two nights per week . Students taking two 
courses or attending courses requiring more than two nights per week are required 
to pay $15 per year for three nights and $20 for four nights. 

All fees and deposits must be paid in advance . 

All students, whether from Lowell or not, taking Course 411, Chemistry and 
Dyeing Department, are required to make a deposit at the commencement of the 
course — $5 for first-year students, and $10 for second-year students. A deposit of 
$10 will be required of all students taking Course 412, 413 or 414. This is to cover 
the cost of laboratory breakages, chemicals, apparatus, etc., and at the end of the 
year any unexpended balance is returned, or an extra charge made for the excess 
breakage. 

All students taking Machine-Shop Practice will be required to make a deposit 
of $5. Any unexpended balance remaining at the end of the year will be returned 
to the student. 


Report of Standing. 

A report of standing covering the year’s work is sent to all students who attend 
the entire year and take the necessary examinations. 

Certificates. 

The courses of the evening school are varied and arranged to meet the special 
needs of those engaged in the industry. They vary in length from one to four 
years, and at the completion of each course the certificate of the school is awarded, 
provided, however, that the student has been in attendance in the course during 
the year for which the certificate is granted. 


6 

GENERAL EVENING COURSES 

The object of these courses is to give young men of ambition an opportunity 
to obtain instruction in all the branches of science that are allied with their daily 
work. For example, one who is employed as a weaver in a textile mill may obtain 
knowledge of the manufacture of yarn, the production of a design, and the methods 
of finishing a fabric, as well as the manner of its weaving or knitting. In like 
manner the dyer may augment his knowledge of the chemicals and materials he 
is daily handling. The engineer and machinist may acquire a knowledge of the 
mathematics, science of mechanics, electricity and drawing that underlie all the 
work of an engineer. 

It is recognized that the interests of such students lie in a particular field of 
industry, and these courses are designed to bear directly upon the special line, 
and supplement, as far as possible, the practical work in which the student is en- 
gaged during the day. 

In a word, any man having a common school education and the ambition to ad- 
vance in his line may now secure a broad and comprehensive training in the sub- 
jects which will be of vital importance to him in obtaining the goal of Ms ideal. 

A description of all courses follows. 

COTTON DEPARTMENT. 

110. Cotton Yarns — 2 Years. 

Because of the desire of students to be able to complete the course in Cotton 
Yarns in less than three years, the schedule has been rearranged to complete the 
work in two years. If a sufficient demand develops for additional work, it may be 
possible to add a course on Mill Organization which will follow the course in Cotton 
Yarns. 

The first year work in cotton yarn manufacture includes a study of cotton and 
its preparation for market, followed by a study of opening, picking, carding and 
combing. This work consists of lectures on these operations combined with prob- 
lems that are peculiar to each operation such as the drafts used and the production 
of each process as well as the amounts of waste made. Special consideration is 
given to the adjustment and care of these machines and some laboratory demon- 
stration is used to show the manner of adjusting machines for the purpose of con- 
trolling the weight of the product, the amount of work done in a day and the con- 
trol of waste. 

Two evenings each week . 

Cotton. — Before taking up the details of manufacturing cotton into yarn, a 
careful study of its physical characteristics is made. The geographical distribution 
of the areas producing commercial cottons is explained and the characteristics of 
the cottons produced in each are studied. A general explanation of the cultivation 
and harvesting of cotton is made, especially emphasizing the effect of agricultural 
factors on the cotton fiber and how these may serve to complicate manufacturing 
problems. 

The ginning of cotton is considered, showing the yield of lint, the uses of cotton 
seed and the various types of gins and which cottons are commonly ginned on each. 

The intricate system of buying and selling cotton is studied to illustrate the 
problems a mill may meet in procuring cotton. In this connection, special em- 
phasis is placed on the classification of cottons by staple, grade and character. 

Opening and Picking. — Instruction in the preliminary operation of opening 
and picking covers the mechanical construction of the machines, their parts and 
adjustments, as fully as the manufacturing results accomplished by the machines. 
This includes such construction details as evener, lap measuring and safety stop 
motions, grids, cleaning trunks and beaters, also operation details which involve 
the adjustment for waste, drafts and character of laps. Some time is devoted to 
mixing in its various phases, showing in addition to improvement in uniformity of 
the product, how cottons are mixed to obtain definite average prices and how dif- 
ferent percentages of color may be obtained by mixing, expecially on the pickers. 


7 

Carding. — The process of carding is considered one of the most important, and 
proper time is devoted to the construction and operation of cards that the student 
may be familiar with the various parts of the card and the function and design of 
each. The construction and application of card clothing, as well as the methods 
of grinding, form a part of the work. Some time is given to a discussion of the 
waste made in carding, the regulation of the amounts of each made and the calcu- 
lation of the percentages. New and special attachments for various purposes are 
brought to the attention of the class, illustrating possible ways of improving carding 
conditions. 

Combing. — The preparation of card sliver for combing by means of the sliver 
lap per and ribbon lapper is thoroughly considered. The combing operation itself 
is studied in considerable detail, emphasizing the general object and operations in 
combing and the specific means employed by various types of combs in performing 
the operations. The calculations in this connection involve the drafts and doub- 
lings necessary to produce the proper lap for the comb, the proper comb drafts, and 
the determination of the per cent of noil produced. 

The second year work in cotton yarn manufacture includes a study of the oper- 
ations of drawing, roving, spinning, spooling, winding and twisting. The work 
consists largely of lectures and problems with some laboratory demonstrations to 
make the student familiar with the machines and the points of adjustment. 

Two evenings each week . 

Drawing. — Under this head is taken up the theory of doublings and their effect 
upon the quality of roving and yarn. Like previous and subsequent processes the 
machine construction forms an important part of the work. Proper attention is 
paid to such subjects as stop motions, drawing rolls and their covering, clearers and 
evener motions. 

Roving Process. — Under this head are studied the various machines known as 
the slubber, intermediate, fine and jack fly frames. Each of the various motions 
of these complicated machines is treated separately and then the group is taken as 
a unit, tying each operation in with the others. Particular attention is paid to the 
subjects of lay and tension because of their importance in producing perfect roving. 
The calculations in this subject involve draft, twist, lay and tension with particular 
attention to the derivation of constants and their use. 

Ring Spinning. — The consideration of spinning yarn by the ring frame method 
involves a knowledge of the uses to which the yarn is to be put and subsequent 
methods of handling, that proper roving may be selected, suitable amounts of 
draft and twist provided, correct size of rings and travelers selected, and building 
motions suitably adjusted. Yarn defects are studied with reference to the cause 
and remedy, necessitating references to many of the earlier operations. 

Spooling and Winding. — The discussions under this head cover the treatment 
of single yarns, in preparation for twisting, comparing the relative merits of spooling 
with multiple winding on tubes, and beaming for special twisters. Winders are also 
considered as a means of preparing yam packages for sale yarns. 

Twisting. — Because of the similarity to ring spinning, the emphasis is more on 
the manufacturing part of the work, although there are a few peculiar features of a 
mechanical nature. The twisting of various regular ply yams, the making of 
numerous fancy yarns and the principles underlying the production of various 
patterns is taken up here. The use of special twisters and other apparatus for 
cords and ropes is considered under this heading. 

WOOLEN AND WORSTED DEPARTMENT. 

210. Worsted Yarns — 2 Years. 

During the first year instruction consists of a lecture course on the various kinds 
of wool fibers, trade terms, sorting, scouring, carbonizing, etc., also a course in 
carding and the calculations involved in the mechanism of the machines, and a 
course covering gilling and combing and the processes of top making. 

Raw Materials. — A study of raw materials which enter into the manufacture 
of woolen or worsted yams, or are made into yarns by processes similar to those 
employed in the manufacture of woolen and worsted yarns, would include silk, 


8 

mohair, alpaca, vicuna, cashmere, camel’s hair and cotton. In connection with 
these are considered shoddy, noils and extracts. 

Wool Sorting. — Familiarity with the various grades and kinds of wool is ob- 
tained by lecture. The various characteristics and properties are explained, as 
are also trade terms, such as picklock, XXX, XX, 34-blood, %-blood, 34-blood, 
delaine, braid, etc. Some skill is acquired in the estimation of shrinkage and in 
judging the spinning qualities. 

Wool Scouring. — The object of scouring and the methods employed are ex- 
plained, and this involves the consideration of soaps and chemicals used in washing; 
also the waste products and their utilization. A demonstration of a commercial 
quantity of wool is scoured by machines that are made similar in operation to 
regular commercial machines. A study is made of the effect of the hardness of 
water upon soap. At the same time the use of driers, their operation and regulation, 
is taken up, and the methods of carbonizing wool, noils, burr waste, rags, etc., are 
studied and explained. 

Carding. — The different systems of carding wool, depending on whether it is 
to be made into woolen or worsted yarns, are fully explained, as well as the con- 
struction, setting and operation of cards. A part of this work consists of a study 
of card clothing, its construction, application and grinding. 

Top Making and Combing. — This branch takes up, besides the carding of the 
wool on a worsted card, the preparing processes, backwashing, also gilling of the 
stock before and after combing. The construction of the gill boxes and combs is 
studied by lectures. Later, quantities of stock are made into top and then into 
yarn. 

Three evenings each week. 

The second year is devoted to detail study of the English and French systems of 
worsted yarn manufacture. 

The Noble, Lister and French combs are studied, and the various calculations 
to determine draft, noiling, productions, etc., are made. 

Drawing and Spinning. — The equipment in the laboratory offers opportunity 
to make worsted yarn by either the Bradford or open drawing system or by the 
French system. The process includes the various machines in the successive steps 
of making Bradford spun yarn, and the functions of the different machines are 
studied. In the latter, or French system, the stock is run through the drawing 
machines, and the roving spun into yarn on the worsted mule. The same method 
of studying the mechanism and operations of these machines is followed as in the 
case of previous methods of instruction. The student by pursuing this course can 
compare the different methods of yarn manufacture and note the results of each. 

With the instruction in spinning by the Bradford system is given work on the 
twisters and the effects that may be produced. 

Three evenings each week . 

211. Woolen Yarns — 2 Years. 

During the first year instruction consists of a lecture course on the various kinds 
of wool fibers, trade terms, sorting, scouring, carbonizing, etc. 

One evening each week. 

The second year covers all the operations in detail necessary to manufacture 
yarns from raw stock on the woolen principle, and includes lectures and laboratory 
work on burr picking, wool blending, mixing, picking, wool oils and emulsions, 
carding, spinning on both mule and ring frame, and plain and novelty twisting. 

Two evenings each week. 

TEXTILE DESIGN AND WEAVING DEPARTMENT. 

311. Cotton Design — 3 Years. 

During the first year instruction is given in elementary designing, starting with 
all the foundation weaves which may be used in fabrics such as the plain weave, 
rib weaves, basket weaves, twill weaves, satin weaves, granite weaves, etc. Com- 


9 

bination and derivative weaves are made up from the aforesaid weaves. Fancy 
and figured weaves, in most cases originated by the student, are produced. Color 
effects, which are so essential in fabrics, obtainable from the different weaves, as 
stated above, in which the color arrangement of warp and filling create the pattern, 
are thoroughly considered. Not only the designing, but also harness drafting 
and the making of dobby chains for all type of weave is taken up. 

Cloth analysis is considered in conjunction with designing, as a designer must 
know the kind of fabric he is designing, what material and what size of yarns are 
to be used, and how heavy and costly the cloth is to be. The various topics dis- 
cussed are the sizes or counts of yarns made from all kinds of fibers, such as cotton, 
woolen, worsted, silk, rayon, jute and yarns of other vegetable fibers. Their 
relative length to the pound is determined in the single two or more ply, mixed 
yarns, novelty yarns and fancy yarns, in the American or English system. The 
same is given in the metric system. Problems involving the take-up of yarns in 
the weaving and finishing process are given. Samples of cloth are picked apart 
to determine their weaves and general construction. 

Two evenings each week. 

In the second year cloth analysis and design are combined in lecture and practice, 
starting with plain and leading into the more fancy cotton dobby fabrics. A great 
variety of samples of cloth are used in class work to determine ends and picks per 
inch, shrinkage in warp and filling, and the number of reed and reed widths necessary 
for eventual reconstruction. The yarn numbers of warp and filling are determined 
by aid of fine balances. The amount of warp and filling necessary for a piece of 
goods is calculated and the weight of a whole piece as well as the number of yards 
per pound are determined. 

Two evenings each week . 

In the third year more elaborate cloths are considered, both in designing and 
analysis, cloths in which extra warp or extra filling, or both, are used. Warp 
backed, filling backed, double, triple or more plied fabrics are taken up, such as 
marseilles, quiltings, pique, suspenders, narrow webbings, velveteens, fancy vel- 
veteens, velvets, corduroys, Bedford cords, plushes, leno, in fact, anything a student 
may suggest which might help him in his work. 

Two evenings each week. 

312. Woolen and Worsted Design — 3 Years. 

This course covers the design and analysis of standard woolen and worsted fabrics 
and is intended for those who wish to specialize in this branch of textile fabric 
manufacture. Special and fancy fabrics are studied to the extent that time will 
permit. 

During the first year instruction is given in the subject of classification of fabrics, 
use of points or design paper, plain fabrics, intersection, twills and their derivation, 
sateen, basket and rib weaves, checks and stripes, fancy weaves, including figured 
and colored effects; producing chain and draw from design, and vice versa ; extending 
and extracting weaves. 

The analysis of samples is taken up in a systematic manner, illustrating the 
various cloth constructions for the purpose of determining the design of the weaves 
and the amount and kind of yarns used, and forms the basis of calculation in the 
cost of reproducing any style of goods. The various topics discussed are reeds and 
setts; relation and determination of counts of cotton, woolen, worsted, silk and 
yarns made from the great variety of vegetable fibers; grading of yarns, folded, ply, 
novelty and fancy yarns; application of the metric system to yarn calculation; 
problems involving take-up, average counts, determination of counts of yarn, and 
weight of yarn required to produce a given fabric. 

Two evenings each week. 

During the second year instruction is given in cotton warp goods, blankets, bath 
robes, filling reversible, extra warp and filling backs, figured effects produced by 
extra warp and filling, double cloths and plaid backs. 

The analysis work follows as closely as possible the type of fabrics taken up in 


10 

the designing and the reconstruction of these fabrics with the consideration of 
their shrinkage and composition. 

Two evenings each week. 

In the third year instruction is given in multiple fabrics, chinchilla, Bedford cords, 
crepon, matelasse and imitations, double plains, meltons, kersey, plush and suitings. 
At this time also is taken up the construction of designers’ blankets, suggestion 
cards, and the construction of samples. 

The construction of new fabrics from theoretical viewpoint together with the 
construction from suggestion cards is taken up. In connection with this work in- 
struction is given in making cost estimates for both woolen and worsted fabrics. 

Two evenings each week. 

313. Decorative Art — 3 Years. 

The first year work consists of charcoal drawing from casts, models, and group 
arrangements of still life. 

Two evenings each week. 

During the second year instruction is given in color harmony — a study of true 
color and the variety of effects obtainable. 

Two evenings each week . 

In the third year the student chooses one of the following options: 

1. Design — Motifs suitable for fabric, wall paper, linoleum, etc. 

2. Costume Illustration — Drawing from the clothed figure. 

3. Oil Painting — A study of values and color using oil as a medium. 

Two evenings each week. 

314. Advertising Design — 2 Years. 

Lettering. — During the first year the student is taught to master the drawing, 
with pencil, of a few very plain alphabets, both upper and lower case letters, also 
plain figures. With the characteristics of plain letter alphabets well in mind, it is 
but a few steps to make any of the more intricate ones. Following this he will make 
simple “lay-outs” of plain card signs, and then take up the lettering, with brush 
and paint, of some of his simple card designs. 

Two evenings each week. 

Show Card Design — The second year is simply a continuation of the latter part 
of the first year work, with the addition of advanced design in the “lay-out” and 
color-scheme of practical show cards and posters, such as are designed and lettered 
in the up-to-date Show Card Shop of to-day. 

Two evenings each week. 

321. Cotton Weaving — 1 Year. 

The Course in Cotton Weaving covers instruction on plain looms, Draper Auto- 
matic and Stafford Automatic looms. It includes instruction on the construction 
of shedding and picking motions, take-up and let-off motions together with the 
operation of the magazines and hoppers and methods of changing shuttle and 
bobbin. A study is also made of the preparation of warps, beaming, sizing and 
drawing-in. The Crompton and Knowles Automatic Towel Looms, and the 
various types of box looms, including chain building and work on multipliers, are 
also considered in this course. 

Two evenings each week. 

322. Woolen and Worsted Weaving — 1 Year. 

This course includes instruction on the Crompton and Knowles loom and takes 
up general construction, head motions, take-up, let-off, filling stop ^ motion, etc. 
The preparation of warps, wet and dry dressing, is given in connection with this 
course. 

Two evenings each week. 


11 


CHEMISTRY AND DYEING DEPARTMENT. 

Hardly any branch of applied science plays so important a part in our industrial 
world as chemistry. Many large mills employ chemists as well as dyers, and with 
the great progress which is being made in the manufacture and application of dye- 
stuffs, a basic knowledge of chemistry becomes an absolute necessity to the dyer. 
Within a comparatively short distance from Lowell are establishments employing 
men who require some knowledge of chemistry but who may not necessarily use 
dyes. Some find a knowledge of analytical chemistry helpful in their everyday 
work. 

To meet these varying needs of our industrial community, the school offers a 
two-year course in general chemistry, organic and inorganic, which may be followed 
by any one of three courses, viz., textile chemistry and dyeing, analytical chemistry, 
and textile and analytical chemistry. In order to take Course 412, 413 or 414, 
candidates must have a certificate from Course 411, or show by examination or 
approved credentials that they have taken the equivalent of the work covered by 
this course. 

411. Elementary Chemistry — 2 Years. 

General Chemistry, including Inorganic and Organic. 

Qualitative Analysis. 

One lecture and one Laboratory Period per week in General Chemistry the first 
year, continued three nights a week during the second year, when the Elementary 
Organic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis is completed. 

Instruction in Elementary Chemistry extends through two years, and includes 
lectures, recitations and a large amount of individual laboratory work upon the 
following subjects: — 

Theoretical Chemistry. — Chemical action, chemical combination, combining 
weights, atomic weights, chemical equations, acids, bases, salts, Avogadro’s law, 
molecular weights, formulae valence, periodic law, etc. 

Non-Metallic Elements. — Study of their occurrence, properties, preparation, 
chemical compounds, etc. 

Metallic Elements. — Study of their occurrence, properties, metallurgy, chem- 
ical compounds, etc. 

The students take up, as thoroughly as time will permit, the qualitative detection 
of the more common metals and non-metals, with practical work. 

This work, although necessarily elementary, is intended to prepare the student 
to study more understanding^ the manufacture of dyestuffs and coal tar colors in 
the more advanced courses which follow. 

During the first year of the Elementary Chemistry course most of the time is 
devoted to the non-metals and theoretical chemistry, and the laboratory work 
covers briefly the non-metals. 

Two evenings each week. 

During the second year the classroom work is upon metals and the hydrocarbons 
and their derivatives, and the laboratory work consists entirely of Qualitative 
Analysis. While this course is necessarily taken up in an abbreviated and ele- 
mentary manner, it is so arranged that the students may become familiar with the 
separations and the detections of the common metals and acids. This course is 
also preliminary to the work given in Analytical Chemistry. 

Three evenings each week. 

412. Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — 3 Years. 

Lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Laboratory Work in Dyeing. 


12 

Covered by 60 lectures and two nights of laboratory work per week. 

The outline of the lecture course given in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing is as 
follows : — 

Technology of Vegetable Fibers. — Cotton, linen, jute, hemp, china grass. 
Chemical and physical properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, 
and their action with chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Animal Fibers. — Wool, mohair, silk. Chemical and physical 
properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, and their action with 
chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Artificial Fibers. — Study of the various forms of artificial 
silk, the process of manufacture, their properties and action with chemicals, acids 
and heat. 

Operations Preliminary to Dyeing. — Bleaching of cotton and linen; wool- 
scouring; bleaching, fulling and felting of wool; carbonizing; silk-scouring and 
bleaching, action of soap. 

The bleaching of cotton is studied with description of the various forms of kiers 
and machinery used; also the action of the chemicals used upon the material, 
and the various precautions that must be taken in order to insure successful work. 

Under this heading is included a study of the reagents used in the emulsive wool- 
scouring process, and their action upon the fiber under various conditions; also the 
most successful of the solvent methods of degreasing wool. 

Water and its Application in the Textile Industry. — Impurities present, 
methods for detection, their effect during the different operations of bleaching, 
scouring, dyeing and printing, and the methods used for their removal or correction. 

The important subject of boiler waters is also studied under this heading, with a 
full discussion of the formation of boiler scale, its disastrous results, and the methods 
by which it may be prevented. 

Mordants and Other Chemical Compounds used in Textile Coloring, 
and Classified as Dyestuffs. — Theory of mordants, their chemical properties 
and application, aluminum mordants, iron mordants, tin mordants, chromium 
mordants, organic mordants, tannin materials, soluble oil, fixing agents, leveling 
agents, assistants, and numerous other compounds not dyestuffs that are exten- 
sively used in the textile industry. 

Under this heading are included the definitions of various terms and classes of 
compounds used by textile colorists, such as color lakes, pigments, fixing agents, 
developing agents, mordanting principles and leveling agents. 

Natural Organic Coloring Matters. — Properties and application of indigo, 
logwood, catechu or cutch, Brazil wood, cochineal, fustic, tumeric, madder, quer- 
citron bark, Persian berries, and other natural dyestuffs that have been used in 
recent years by textile colorists. 

Mineral Coloring Matters. — Under this heading are discussed the proper- 
ties of such inorganic coloring matters and pigments as chrome yellow, orange and 
green, Prussian blue, manganese brown, iron buff. 

Artificial Coloring Matters. — General discussion of their history, nature, 
source, methods of manufacture, methods of classification and their application 
to all fibers. 

Besides lectures and recitations upon the subject of Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing, practical laboratory work is required. By the performance of careful and 
systematic experiments the student learns the nature of the various dyestuffs and 
mordants, their coloring properties, their action under various circumstances, and 
the conditions under which they give the best results. The more representative 
dyestuffs of each class are applied to cotton, wool and silk, and each student is 
obliged to enter, in an especially arranged sample book, a specimen of each of his 
dye trials with full particulars as to the conditions of experiment, percentage of 
compounds used, time, temperature of dye baths, etc. 

For convenience and economy most of the dye trials are made upon small skeins 
or swatches of the required materials, but from time to time students are required 
to dye larger quantities in the full-sized dyeing machines. 


13 


413. Analytical Chemistry — 3 Years. 

Laboratory Work and Lectures in Quantitative Analysis. 

Three nights each week of class-room and laboratory work. 

The object of this course is to give the student a general idea of the underlying 
principles of Analytical Chemistry, with a sufficient amount of laboratory work to 
enable him to become proficient in performing the ordinary routine analysis of the 
textile plant. Frequent recitations are held for the discussion of methods and the 
solution of stoichiometrical problems. 

The work covered the first two years is based on Smith’s “Quantitative Analy- 
sis,” and for the advanced work, consists of the analysis of soap, water, oils, cloth 
and other materials of particular interest to the textile chemist, special lecture notes 
and Griffin’s “Technical Methods of Analysis” is used as a text. 

414. Textile and Analytical Chemistry — 4 Years. 

Lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Laboratory Work in Analytical Chemistry. 

Combines all lectures in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing with work of Course 413, 
but does not include any Dyeing Laboratory. 

Three evenings each week. 

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 
510. English Composition — 2 Years. 

Remedial English and Rhetoric— First year. Parts I and II. In order 
to write well it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of grammar. More- 
over, it is a great satisfaction to know why you are correct in speaking and writing 
a certain way. This course is designed to give a comprehensive survey of necessary 
grammatical and rhetorical principles. 

The following subjects are studied: The eight parts of speech — characteristics 
and use of each; the kinds and the structure of sentences; punctuation; the building 
up of the paragraph; the principles of composition; description, exposition, narra- 
tion, argumentation, and letter writing; study of difficult words; and selections 
from various authors to be read for general interest and for the purposes of illus- 
tration. 

10 assignments in each part with an examination at the end of each part. 

One evening each week . 

Problems in the Interpretation and the Appreciation of Literature— 
Second year . — This subject is offered for those who wish to enlarge their cultural 
background and to study the principles of literary appreciation and criticism. 
Altho there will be emphasis upon literary technique, the constant aim will be to 
keep this subordinate to the spirit and the message of the selection. 

The prose and the poetry studied will be treated analytically, with directed 
investigation of the various literary appeals — the intellectual, the sensory, the 
emotional, the aesthetic, the imaginative, and the philosophical. Emphasis will 
also be placed upon the value of an extensive reading program. (This course will 
not be given if the registration is less than twenty-five.) 

One evening each week. 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

This department has arranged to offer those courses of study which lie at the 
foundation of all engineering. These are designed to give to those engaged in the 
mechanical, electrical, and manufacturing departments of mills, factories and other 
industrial establishments an opportunity to learn something concerning the theory 
underlying the many practical methods which they use in their daily work. Those 
subjects for which there is usually a regular demand are listed and described below, 
but similar and allied courses will also be arranged for provided there is a sufficient 
demand. In the case of all courses there must be an enrollment of at least ten 
properly qualified students to warrant giving the subject. 


14 


613. Mechanical Drawing — 3 Years. 

For one having occasion to make a sketch or detail drawing for the purposes of 
illustration or instruction, or for one who is daily required to work from a drawing 
or blueprint, the course in Mechanical Drawing is offered. It first lays a founda- 
tion of the principles of mechanical drawing, and follows this with two years’ work 
in drawing directly from parts of machines, preparing both the detail and the 
assembly drawing. 

This course is a complete course in drawing and requires two evenings per week 
for three years for its completion. The work is so planned that at its completion 
a man shall be thoroughly familiar with the making of a working or shop drawing. 
After a study of the underlying principles of projections and instruction in penciling, 
inking, lettering and tracing, the subject of sketching and the making of detail 
drawings therefrom is especially stressed. The preparation of assembly drawings 
is finally considered. 

614. Machine Shop Practice — 2 Years. 

This course offers an opportunity to learn the art of metal working and is equally 
valuable to the man who already has some knowledge of the methods employed as 
to one who has no knowledge of the same. Thus it becomes possible for one who 
may be working at the bench during the day to learn how to operate a lathe or other 
machine tool, or for a lathe hand to acquire a Imowledge of a planer, shaper, milling 
machine, or grinder. A series of lectures is given on the care and management of 
tools, tool grinding, and the mechanism of the machines. A man who only has a 
knowledge of the special machine he operates may by means of this course become 
a more intelligent machinist. He should supplement this study with the courses 
in Mechanical Drawing, and in Mechanics and Mechanism, in order that his train- 
ing for an all-round machinist or mechanic may be more complete. The time 
required is two evenings each week. 

619. Mechanics — 1 Year. 

This is one of the most important of engineering subjects. Its principles are so 
fundamental and so widely used in more advanced subjects that the student should 
not consider himself qualified for further work until he has mastered the principles 
of this subject. 

Beginning with a discussion of such important topics as work, power, horse- 
power, energy and the like, the student then studies the fundamental mechanical 
principles which are exemplified by the lever, jackscrew, pulley block, inclined 
plane, wedge, differential pulley and other similar devices. This is followed by 
consideration of the simpler relations pertaining to uniform and accelerated motion. 
No student should undertake this course who is not thoroughly familiar with 
elementary mathematics. This subject requires attendance two evenings each week 
with home problem work and the study of a text book. 

620. Mathematics — 2 Years. 

This course is designed to permit the student to pursue further by evening study 
the mathematics of his grammar or junior high school course. It includes algebra, 
elementary trigonometry, logarithms and slide rule, and requires attendance for 
two evenings each week . It should be taken by all who intend to study further into 
engineering subjects. Instruction is largely through problem work in class and 
at home, and the use of a text book. 

Some of the topics treated are — 

Elementary algebraic operations of — 

Addition. Linear equations. 

Subtraction. Radicals. 

Multiplication. Quadratic equations. 

Division. Logarithms. 

Factoring. Slide rule. 

Fractions. Trigonometry 

Graphical representation. 


15 


621. Strength of Materials — 1 Year. 

This interesting subject deals with those important principles whereby the person 
engaged in machine, engine, mill or building design may ascertain whether the parts 
are strong enough to carry the forces and loads which the nature of the construction 
imposes upon them. 

The fundamental stresses of tension, compression and shear are first considered, 
together with the ultimate strength of cast iron, wrought iron,, steel, and timber. 
The practical use of this information is illustrated in the design of bolts, tie rods, 
columns, wall piers, boiler shells, riveted joints, etc. This is followed by a study 
of the stresses in and design of beams under various conditions of loading, and the 
course concludes with a discussion of the torsional stresses and twist in shafts. A 
knowledge of the principles of Mechanics and Mechanism is highly desirable to a 
satisfactory understanding of this subject. The time required is two evenings each 
week and the method of instruction is through lectures, recitations, problems, and 
the use of a text book. 

622. Steam — 1 Year. 

It is the purpose of this course to study the various methods of heat generation, 
transmission, and utilization in use at the present day and to learn the theoretical 
relationship which underlie these processes and transformations. 

The instruction covers, so far as time permits, the elements of steam engineering. 
The topics covered are heat and its measurement, use of steam tables, types of 
boilers, engines and turbines, boiler and engine room accessories, together with a 
study of the methods of testing the various types of apparatus. Actual tests on 
such equipment are made as the size of the class permits. Text books, laboratory 
and class work, and home problems are the methods of instruction used, requiring 
an attendance of two evenings each week . 

623. Direct Current Electricity — 2 Years. 

This popular course is planned to cover the fundamentals of direct current 
circuits and machinery. The lectures on electrical theory are supplemented by 
laboratory work and the use of a text book and problems. It requires for its com- 
pletion attendance for two evenings each week and a considerable amount of home 
study and preparation. Students who wish to take this subject must have studied 
one year of algebra. 

The fundamental properties of electrical and magnetic circuits are studied both 
in the classroom and laboratory. Other topics include the measurement of resis- 
tance, the calculation and measurement of power in direct-current circuits, and the 
relation between the electrical, heat and mechanical units of energy. A large 
amount of laboratory and class work is given to make the student familiar with 
methods of operation, testing and control of direct current machinery. 

624. Alternating Current Electricity. — 2 Years. 

This course is similar to Course 623 except that it deals with alternating current 
circuits and machinery. No student should plan to take this course unless he has 
previously taken at least one year of Course 623 or can show that he has had the 
equivalent. 

The fundamental properties of alternating current circuits are first considered, 
and are followed by a study of the operation of alternating current machinery. 
The study of electrical measuring instruments is also included in this course. The 
instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, and a large amount of labora- 
tory work. An attendance of two evenings each week is required. 

625. Power Plant Machinery — 1 Year. 

The purpose of this course is to teach the operating engineer how to test the va- 
rious units usually found in a power plant. Numerical calculations are introduced 
and the interpretation of the results is of primary importance. 

The following are some of the machines tested: engine, turbine, triplex pump, 
centrifugal pump, injector, etc. Various gages are also calibrated. 

A test book is required and the class is held two evenings each week . 


16 


626. Mill Illumination — 1 Year. 

Because of the demand by mill men, this course is now offered to evening 
students and requires an attendance of two evenings each week . 

Safety and production, factors entering into the design of lighting installations, 
industrial codes, costs and estimates are carefully considered. The laboratory 
exercises include the study of photometric curves of industrial units, study and use 
of the photometer, study of illumination by means of the Macbeth Illuminometer, 
and foot-candle meter. 

The concluding work will be the complete design of a lighting installation, using 
the Institute laboratories or a local mill room. 

Owing to limitations in apparatus, this course is open to a limited number of 
qualified men. 

629. Selling, Advertising, and Marketing — 1 Year. 

An elementary course designed to acquaint the student with the principles in- 
volved in the distribution and merchandising of textiles and other commodities. 

The course is given in two parts. One evening a week the principles underlying 
salesmanship and advertising are studied. The other evening is devoted to a study 
of marketing principles and practice. Both parts must be taken in order to secure 
a certificate. 

The selling and advertising section deals with the psychology of selling and ad- 
vertising, copy writing, layout, illustrations, mechanical requirements of copy and 
illustration, advertising campaigns, personality, types of customers, the selling 
process, dramatization, etc. 

The marketing section covers modern methods of distributing goods with special 
emphasis on the textile industry. The functions and importance of selling agents, 
brokers, converters, wholesalers, factors, retailers and other intermediaries in the 
channels of distribution are studied as well as the fundamentals of styling, market 
research, pricing, forecasting, retailing, wholesaling, and other pertinent topics. 

The material is presented by means of lectures and class discussions and assigned 
problems. An attendance of two evenings each week is required. 

630. Mechanism — 1 Year. 

This course deals with those principles and elementary mechanism which are 
used in the transmission of motion through machines and mechanical devices. It 
requires a knowledge of the principles developed in “mechanics” and hence can be 
taken only by qualified students. The instruction includes pulleys, belting, gears, 
gearing, cams and similar topics. The requirements are attendance two evenings 
each week with home problem work and the study of a text book. 

Accounting Classes (Division of University Extension) 

Classes in Elementary, Advanced and Cost Accounting have been offered in 
past years at the Lowell Evening Textile School under the auspices of the Division 
of University Extension, State House, Boston, Mass. Their continuance is de- 
pendent upon a sufficient expression of interest in them. Outlines of the courses, 
fees, etc., may be obtained by inquiry at the above address or by addressing the 
school. 


FINISHING DEPARTMENT. 

In these courses machine work is supplemented by lectures and discussions per- 
taining to the many finishes given to fabrics. The action of soaps, water, steam, 
heat and cold upon cloth containing one fiber or combination of fibers as used in 
commercial fabrics is carefully studied. These courses also help the finisher to 
broadeu his knowledge of textile fabrics. Attendance is required for two evenings 
each week. 

710. Woolen and Worsted Finishing — 1 Year. 

The outline of this course, which is given chiefly by means of lecture work, is as 
follows: 

Burling and Mending. — Under this head are taken up for consideration the 
examination of flannel as it comes from the loom; the construction, use and location 
of the perch; the methods used in marking defects, measuring, weighing and num- 


17 

bering of cloths; also the methods of inspection for fancies, single cloths and double 
cloths. The object of burling, mending and the types of tables employed, the 
method of removing knots, runners, etc., the object of back shearing and the use 
of burling irons, the replacing of missing threads and the importance of sewing as 
a part of the finishing process, are also considered in detail. The removal of oil 
and tar spots as well as stains of various kinds is studied. 

Fulling. — This branch covers a study of the conditions of the flannel as it 
comes from the loom, and the influence of oil, etc., upon the procedure. Consider- 
able time is devoted to the various methods of producing a felt, the various types 
of stocks and their modifications and development into the present type of rotary 
fulling mills of both single and double variety. The details of construction in all 
machines are carefully taken up and include the design and composition of the 
main rolls, method of covering, regulation and means of adjusting the pressure of 
traps and rolls, and the use and regulation of the various types of stopmotion, the 
different types of stretchers, guide rolls and throat plates. 

The theory of felt is taken up and the influence of pressure, moisture, heat, alkali 
and acid is considered, as well as the hydroscopic and felting properties of different 
wool fibers. The preparation of the flannel for the mill and the usual methods of 
determining shrinkages, as well as the various methods of soaping, are given careful 
attention. The preparation of various fulling soaps and the value of each for the 
production of various degrees of felt, as well as the determination of the proper 
amount of alkali for various goods, are carefully studied and demonstrated. The 
manipulation of the various kinds of goods in the mill, viz., all wool, reworked 
wools and mixed goods, is studied in classroom and by operation in the laboratory. 

The change in weight and strength for each operation is carefully considered, as 
is also the value of the flocks made in each. A study of the various methods of 
flocking, such as dry and wet, is considered in both class and machine rooms. In 
each operation the defects likely to materialize are studied, as well as the cause 
thereof, and various methods of modifying or lessening them. 

Washing and Speck Dyeing. — This branch considers the scouring, rinsing and 
washing of goods both before and after the fulling process; the various types of 
washers; and the details of construction, such as suds box, rolls, etc. The theory 
of scouring, uses of Fuller’s earth, salt solutions and sours on the different kinds of 
goods are made clear by practical work in the machine room, where the effects due 
to improper scouring, such as stains, cloudy effects, wrinkles and unclean goods, 
are demonstrated. The discussion of the necessity of speck dyeing follows natur- 
ally from the study of these matters, and includes methods of preparation, ma- 
terials used, application and tests required. 

Carbonizing. — This is an important branch of finishing, and includes a study 
of the various carbonizing agents, methods of application, strength of solutions and 
neutralizing, as well as the machines used. Stains and imperfections resulting 
from carbonizing are also considered. The drying and tentering machines and 
extractors employed are taken up at this point. 

Gigging, Napping and Steaming. — The construction in detail of the various 
types of gigs, nappers, steamers, wet gigs, rolling, stretching, crabbing and singeing 
machines is discussed, and their actions upon the cloth and the results obtained 
are explained. 

Various methods of obtaining luster and the production of permanent finish are 
considered in connection with steaming and sponging. 

Brushing, Shearing and Pressing. — This includes, as do the other branches, 
a careful treatment of the machine employed, the preparation of the cloth for each 
process, the action of each machine in producing its part of the resultant effect. 
In the manipulation of the shear consideration is given to its setting, grinding and 
adjustment. With the brushing machine the effect of steaming and moisture upon 
the luster and feel of the goods is shown. A study of the action of the presses, both 
plate and rotary, involves consideration of pressure, steaming, etc. Special pro- 
cesses to obtain particular effects are taken up, and the part played by each machine 
is explained. The details involved in handling cloth on a commercial scale, as, for 


18 

example, measuring, weighing, ticketing, numbering and rolling, are also explained. 
The necessary calculation and the methods of finishing all grades of goods are con- 
sidered from time to time during the year. 

Two evenings each week. 

711. Cotton Finishing — 1 Year. 

The outline of the course in the finishing of cotton fabrics is as follows: — 

Cloth Room. — Instruction of the various goods and the objects thereof; con- 
struction of the various types of inspecting and trimming machines. 

Shearing. — The object. A consideration of the various types of shears for 
treating one or both sides at the same time; also the use of the usual cleaning de- 
vices, such as emery, sand and card rolls, beaters and brushes; grinding and the 
adjustment of the various parts. 

The use of brushing and cleaning machines, rolling devices and calender attach- 
ments for gray goods. 

Singeing. — Developing and object of singeing; the construction of singers of all 
types, and for various purposes; the use of cooling tanks, steaming devices, rolling 
and brushing attachments. 

Regulation of the flame for various goods, and adjustment of the parts; gas and 
air pressure, water-cooled rolls; the effect of moisture on the cost of singeing; the 
use of dry cans in connection with singeing; electric singeing. 

Washing. — Open width and string washers, their construction and operation; 
soaps, temperature, squeeze rolls; washing of various goods and the object thereof; 
stains. 

Napping. — The object of napping and the usual method of treating goods; 
various types of nappers, single and double acting; felting nappers; construction, 
grinding and adjustment of various types. 

Water Mangles. — Their object and construction of various types; various 
rolls, — iron, husk, etc., scutchers, their object and construction. 

Starch Mangles. — The object and construction of all types of starch mangles 
for pure starch and filled goods; various types of rolls, — brass, rubber, wood; action 
of doctor blades, etc.; regulation and object of pressure. 

Methods of starching and finishing all standard goods, also a consideration 
of the various substances used, such as starch, softener and fillers; the preparation 
of starch and various methods of application. 

Dryers and Stretchers. — Both horizontal and vertical, tenter frames, clips; 
the swing motion and the finishes thus produced; construction; spraying machines, 
belt stretchers, button breakers; their object and construction. 

Calenders. — The object and construction of all types, including the regulation 
of pressure and nips for the production of various finishes; various types of rolls 
and their uses, — steel, husk and paper; the use of hot and cold rolls; chasing, fric- 
tion, embossing and Shriner calenders and the various finishes produced by each; 
production of watered effects; beetling machines. 

Making up room, — yarding, inspecting; different types of folds; pressing, paper- 
ing, marking. 

Two evenings each week . 


EVENING GRADUATES OF 1935. 


Certificates awarded as follows, April 23, 1935: 

Cotton Yarns — 2 Years. 
William Endicott, 2nd ...... 

Elwyn Warren Mitchell ..... 

Perley Hill Shaw ....... 

George Simpson ....... 

Herbert MacWhinnie Weymouth .... 

Knitting — 2 Years. 

James William Scott 

Alfred John Traverse ...... 

Woolen Yarns — 2 Years. 

Frederick Darlington 

Henry Francis Drenth ...... 

Joseph Kieva ....... 

Hubert Gerald McAnespie ..... 

Raymond Thomas McDonagh .... 

Richard Holden Olney ...... 

Daniel Maurice Seamans 

Otho Wilton Tompkins ...... 

Worsted Yarns — 2 Years. 
John Rostron Berwick ...... 

Joseph Harper Binns ...... 

Joseph Frederic Burtt ...... 

Lawrence Greenfield ...... 

George Frederick Hemas ..... 

Joseph Jacob Kisiolek ...... 

Charles William Kobos ...... 

Edward Everett Maddocks 

Francis Jerome Mahoney ..... 

George Sumner Orr 

Herman Robert Schmottlach ..... 
James William Stott ...... 


Lowell 
Methuen 
Nashua, N. H. 
Andover 
Nashua, N. H. 


Everett 

Lowell 


Lawrence 

Methuen 

Methuen 

Dracut 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

West Concord 


Andover 

North Andover 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Lawrence 

Chelmsford 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Methuen 

Methuen 

Methuen 


Cotton Design — 3 Years. 

Joseph Adam Lacerte, Jr Lowell 


Woolen and Worsted Design — 3 Years. 

Edgar Wallace Birdsall 

Thomas Bernard Casey ....... 

Percy Horace Helie ....... 

Archie McKellar Smith . . 


Malden 

North Billerica 
Worcester 
Manchester, N. H. 


Advertising Design — 2 Years. 
Doris Rachel Atkinson ...... 

Robert Joseph Carmody ..... 

Emma Clarke 

Albini Alfred Dufresne ...... 

Henry Lucien Gauthier ...... 

Roy Elgin Hardy ....... 

Paul Henry Hirbour ...... 

Eleanor Beatrice Ingalls 

Peter Joseph McErlane ...... 


Lowell 

Wilmington 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Pelham, N. H. 
Lowell 
Lowell 
Lowell 


20 


Clement Alphonse Miron 
Jasper Jerry Pechner 
Dorothy Isabel Scott 
Rita Theresa Sullivan 
Sidney Ellsworth Vining 
Daniel Joseph Wholey . 


Decorative Art — 3 Years. 


Patricia Gertrude Cormier 
Charlotte Eleanor Evirs 
John Patrick Finn 
Lillian Agnes McKenna 
Robert Douglas Weymouth 
Edith Auriel Williams . 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Pelham, N. H. 
Lowell 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 


Cotton Weaving — 1 Year. 


Joseph Frank Bobusia ....... Lowell 

Philip Little Carlman Salem 

Mary Constantis ........ Lowell 

William Cuipa Lowell 

Peter Samuel Dolly ....... Lowell 

Thomas Kinlock Fretwell ...... Lawrence 

Charles Joseph Gibadlo Lowell 

Heman Burns Hunter ....... Salem 

Oscar Jardin Lowell 

Walter Stanley Kowalski ...... Lowell 

Claire Lillian Lajeunesse ...... Lowell 

Wilfred Avila Lepine ....... Lowell 

Joseph Domingos Pereira ...... Lowell 

Raymond Alcide Sevigny ...... Lowell 

Joshua Kay Stalker ....... Lowell 

Romeo Eldhege Touzin Lowell 

Stanley Wroblewski ....... Lowell 

Clara Zouvelos ........ Lowell 

Vasilo Zouvelos ........ Lowell 


Woolen and Worsted Weaving — 1 Year. 

Henry Jules Bourgeois 

Richard Augustine Burns ...... 

Gerard Joseph Chenell ....... 

Leopold Chenell ........ 

Charles Edward Coffey, Jr. ..... 

David Alexander Stirling Doig 

George James Dyer ....... 

Albert John Germain ....... 

Charles Joseph Gibadlo 

Joseph Charles Gibadlo ....... 

Raymond Terrence Griffin 

Leo Grondine ........ 

Donald Bernard Humphrey ...... 

Edward Joseph Jastrzab 

William Paul Jonis ....... 

Benjamin Kalinowski . . 

Walter Daniel Kohanski ...... 

Frank Valenty Krofka ...... 

Fred Dean Manchester ....... 

John David Manning . 

William Martineau ....... 

Christopher Lawrence Muller 

Zenon Wardsworth Narkun ...... 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

North Billerica 

Andover 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lowell 

North Andover 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Andover 

Methuen 


21 


George Edward Netto ...... 

Stephen Paul Nida ...... 

Lionel Theophile Pelletier 

Laurent Joseph Rioux ...... 

Ernest Dobson Robinson ..... 

Herbert Hodgson Robinson ..... 

Joseph Narcisse Romeo Saucier .... 

Edgar Armand Seguin ...... 

Martin Silva ....... 

William Sybiak ....... 

Joseph Robert Tousignant ..... 

Rolland Carmel Vincent ..... 

Clifford Rudolph Watson . . . 

Stanley Tadeusz Zbieg . . . . 

Loom Fixing — 1 Year. 
William Lucien Carignan ..... 
Gerard Joseph Goudrault .... 

Adolph Joseph Johnson 

Patrick Joseph Keegan ...... 

Thomas Harris Lauzon ...... 

Joseph Michael Piekos ...... 

Theodore Louis Piekos 

Francis Gordon Rodgers . 

Cotton Finishing — 1 Year. 
Dryden Lawrence Ballantyne .... 
Carl Herbert Kruschwitz ..... 
Manuel Cunha Rosa ...... 


Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 


North Billerica 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Methuen 


Lawrence 

Methuen 

Methuen 


Woolen and Worsted Finishing — 1 Year. 


David Eaton Arthur 
Vincent Murtaugh Borrows . 
Charles Herman Appleby Dunker 
John Bain Gledhill 
James Arthur Kenyon 
William Aloysius Kulpinski 
John Francis Martin 
Hiram Manly Metcalfe . 

John Bernard Moran 
Winford Sykes Nowell . 

Leo Joseph Rollins 
Raymond Boyd Spence . 


Methuen 

Chelmsford 

Brookline 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Haverhill 

Methuen 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lowell 


Elementary Chemistry — 2 Years 
Richard Joseph Allen ...... 

William Gray Bailey ...... 

Angelo John Boutselis 

Bernard Joseph Bresnahan, Jr .... 

John Cruickshank Burnett ..... 
Frank Leo Carr ..... 

Angela Agnes Conlin . 

Najie Elias Daher ...... 

John Doulames . . 

William Arthur Drummond ..... 

George Henry Ennis ...... 

Wilfred Alfred Findeisen 

James Lafayette Hart ...... 

Weldon Maxwell Huckins ..... 

Harry Ralph Johnson ...... 


Lowell 

Newton Highlands 

Lowell 

Methuen 

Andover 

Lowell 

East Chelmsford 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

North Andover 

North Billerica 

Methuen 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lawrence 


22 


Harry Theodore Johnson 
Joseph Vincent King 
Paul Bernard Klier 
Harold Earl Knight 
Ernest Albert Lehninger 
Arthur Charles McDonough 
Sidney Robert Marsden 
John Erwin Martin 
John Joseph Morrison . 
James Edward O’Donnell 
Roger Merrill Peabody . 
James Harrison Rishton 
James Francis Rourke 
George Rodney Schmottlach 
John Smith . 

Maurice Churchill Stanley 
Bernard Francis Tracy . 
George Albert Tyler 
Anthony John Villani 


Lowell 

Haverhill 

Lawrence 

North Billerica 

Methuen 

Lawrence 

Methuen 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Andover 

Manchester, N H. 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

North Andover 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Lawrence 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — 3 Years. 
Harold Mudd ... .... 

James Lamont Phillips ....... 

Joseph Usher Ryan, Jr. . 

Wilbur Lane Williams 


Lawrence 

Andover 

Haverhill 

Lowell 


Analytical Chemistry — 3 Years. 

Edward Lawrence Dinneen ...... Lowell 

Joseph Patrick Kenefick Lowell 


Alternating Current Electricity — 2 Years. 


Peter Anderson 
Edward John Dunn 
Joseph Francis Finn 
Arne John Mikkola 
James Allen Shanks 
Jack Thornton 
Michael Valentine Torla 


Andover 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Dracut 

Lowell 

Lawrence 


Direct Current Electricity — 2 Years. 


William George Chapman ...... Lowell 

Raymond Arthur Flanders ...... Methuen 

Lucien Henry Haesebrouck ...... Lowell 

Carl Alfred Henning ....... Methuen 

Desmond Alexander McElholm ..... Lowell 

Ronald Ernest Pray ....... Lowell 

Ralph Emmons Tweed ....... Lowell 

Mechanical Drawing — 3 Years. 

Thomas Edwin Banks ....... Lowell 

Henry Joseph Brunelle ....... Lowell 

Maurice Ludger Gauthier . . . . . Lowell 

Machine Shop Practice — 2 Years. 

Arthur David April ....... Lowell 

Real Emil Joseph Bolduc s . Lowell 

James Arthur Cashman ....... Lowell 

John Crossley ........ Lowell 

Glendon Wordsworth Donaghey ..... Lowell 


23 


Frank Gilbert Fowler 

North Billerica 

Charles John Hondras ... . 

Lowell 

Gerard Pamphile Jean ... 

Lowell 

William Anthony McArthur ...... 

Lowell 

Milton Arthur Robbins ...... 

Ayer 

Casimir Francis Sperling ...... 

Lowell 

Eugene Joseph Walsh 

Lowell 

Mathematics — 2 Years. 

Paul Albert Daigle 

Lawrence 

Arthur Leonard Dunnigan ..... 

Lowell 

Harold Charles Griffin 

Lowell 

Arthur Haritos. ........ 

Lowell 

Beatrice Theresa Hoar ....... 

Lowell 

Edgar Russell Kay 

Lowell 

Hector Landry 

Lowell 

William Copp Newall ....... 

Lawrence 

George Ormsby ........ 

Lowell 

Roland Henry Thurber ....... 

Lowell 

Steam — 1 Year. 

Julius Walter Amsiejus ....... 

Dracut 

Wilfred Bottomley ....... 

North Andover 

Theodore Chmura 

Lawrence 

Thomas Raymond Hoyle ...... 

Lowell 

William Robertson Kiesling ...... 

Methuen 

Paul Kotarba ........ 

Lowell 

Maurice Henry Quinlan ...... 

Lowell 

Selling and Advertising — 1 Year. 

Wilfred Leo Beauregard, Jr. . 

Lowell 

Raymond William Berry ...... 

Lowell 

Harold Dodge Buck ...... 

Lowell 

John Kenrick Butler ....... 

Lowell 

Robert Martin Chenevert ..... 

Lowell 

Vernon Stanley Cook ...... 

Lowell 

George Clarence Fairburn, Jr. 

Lowell 

Andr6 Henri Gervais ...... 

Lowell 

Caiman Hoffman ........ 

Lowell 

Edward James Kennedy ...... 

Lowell 

Donald Stevens Maclnnis ..... 

Lowell 

Hugh MacQueen 

Lowell 

Stephen Gerry Mansur ....... 

Lowell 

Joseph Patrick Moynihan ...... 

Lowell 

Mary Xavia Sullivan ....... 

Lowell 




< 


- 


SERIES 39, No. 2 


November, 1935 


BULLETIN 

OF THE 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1935-1936 


Entered Attest 26, 1902. et Lowell, Mare., at seeond-elaas matter 
undeir Act of Congress of July 16 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3 
1917, authorized on October 21, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication op this Document Approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2200 — 12-L35. Order 6236* 


2 


THE EFFECT OF REGAIN 
ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH AND ELONGATION 
OF VISCOSE RAYON YARN 

by Harry C. Brown, S. B., Assistant Professor of Physics 

The physical properties of textile fibers are affected by the amount of 
moisture absorbed by them. The amount of moisture present in fibers depends 
largely upon the relative humidity of the atmosphere provided that the time 
of exposure is sufficient to produce a condition of equilibrium in moisture 
content. 

Investigations made by means of polarized light and X-rays indicate that 
both artificial and natural textile fibers have a definite crystalline structure. 
The crystals are arranged in chain-like formations or aggregates with the 
long axes approximately parallel to the fiber axis, and there is possibly an 
amorphous binding material between the chain groups. Viscose rayon filaments 
have shown a good degree of orientation with no spirality. 1 

According to one authority, 2 water may be held in combination with 
cellulose fibers in five different forms: (1) as water of the cellulose, (2) as 
capillary water, (3) as colloidal water, (4) as osmotically combined water, 
(5) as chemically combined water, or water of hydration. The presence of 
water in one or more of these forms probably weakens the force holding the 
chain-aggregates together or lessens the binding power of the non-crystalline 
material between the chains, resulting in a decrease in tensile strength and an 
increase in ultimate elongation in the case of rayon yarns. 

The effect of regain upon the tensile strength and elongation of viscose 
rayon yarns was investigated by David J. Fox, 1934, as an undergraduate 
thesis, under the direction of Professor H. J. Ball, in charge of the Textile 
Engineering Department of the Lowell Textile Institute, and the data found 
in this bulletin are taken from that investigation. 

Six different kinds of viscose rayon yarn were kindly furnished by a local 
mill for breaking strength-elongation tests. Five 120-yard skeins were prepared 
from each specimen of yarn and conditioned in a room equipped with a 
humidifier electrically controlled so that the humidity could be maintained 
constant within one and one-half per cent. Single strand breaking strength- 
elongation tests were made after conditioning for three hours in an atmosphere 
of constant relative humidity and temperature of 70° to 75° F. Tests were 
made at relative humidities of 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 per cent. The humidities 
were selected so as to include the usual range encountered under working 
conditions and also to secure approximately equal increments of regain. 

Tests were made by a single strand Schopper testing machine upon one 
hundred single yarns taken from each skein. The testing machine was of the 
pendulum type and was provided with an elongation scale giving the ultimate 
elongation in tenths of a millimeter. The initial distance between jaws was 
25 cm., the speed of the pulling jaw was 12 inches per minute, and the initial 
load on the yarn was 10 grams. Portions of the broken yarn were weighed 
in order to determine the actual regain at the time of testing. 

The averages of one hundred breaking strength-elongation tests at five 
different relative humidities upon six different specimens of viscose rayon 
are given in Table I. 

Plots of regain and breaking strength indicate that decrease in breaking 
strength is approximately proportional to increase in regain. Plots of regain 


1 Morey, “Textile Research", Vol. IV, No. 11 

2 Matthews, “Textile Fibers”, Page 352 


and elongation show that the change in ultimate per cent elongation is 
approximately proportional to change in regain. elongation is 

. „ T1 J? effects of re g ai « and relative humidity upon breaking strength and 
elongation are summarized in Table II. The rates of decrease in breaking 
strength given in Table II are based upon the tests of the first five specimens 
of viscose rayon yarns at the selected humidities. The rates of increase in 
elongation are based upon the tests of all six specimens. 

- Figure I shows the relation between regain and breaking strength of one 
of the specimens and very closely represents the average effect of regain upon 
the first five specimens. Figure I also shows the relation between regain and 
ultimate elongation for another specimen and very closely represents the 
average effect of regain upon the six different specimens. 


Table I 

AVERAGES OF 

BREAKING STRENGTH-ELONGATION TESTS 
OF VISCOSE RAYON YARNS 


Description of 

Relative 

Regain 

Breaking 

Ultimate 

Yarn Specimen 

Humidity 

% 

Strength 

Elongation 


(%) 


( Grams ) 

% 



75 

#1 

65 

Denier 153.6 

55 

Filaments 42 

45 

Luster — Soft 

35 


18.7 

201 

15.4 

223 

12.4 

238 

10.7 

255 

10.4 

257 


22.5 

21.1 

20.6 
18.9 
15.7 



75 

#2 

65 

Denier 148.5 

55 

Filaments 40 

45 

Luster — Soft Bright 35 


18.3 243 19.7 

15.4 244 18 4 

14.0 272 15.7 

12 -° 295 15.5 

9.7 292 14.1 



75 

#3 

65 

Denier 154.6 

55 

Filaments 24 

45 

Luster — Bright 

35 


1^-3 206 26.6 

16.1 217 23.7 

14.9 237 21.0 

14.2 261 20.2 

9 - 9 256 15.6 


75 

#4 65 

Denier 102.5 55 

Filaments 40 45 

35 


18.8 

155 

17.1 

166 

15.8 

168 

14.0 

189 

13.2 

195 


16.7 
14.2 
11.5 

12.7 
9.9 


75 

#5 55 

Denier 154.2 55 

Filaments 40 45 

35 


17.3 208 

15.0 227 

12.2 238 

10.9 256 

9 -4 257 


#6 

Denier 149.0 
Filaments 40 
Luster — Dull 


75 

15.0 

65 

13.8 

55 

13.6 

45 

13.3 

35 

11.5 


244 

264 

276 

285 

275 


24.9 

22.1 

20.9 
20.2 
16.2 

16.8 

15.5 

14.7 
13.2 

11.8 


4 

Table II 


AVERAGE EFFECT OF REGAIN 
UPON BREAKING STRENGTH AND ELONGATION OF 
VISCOSE RAYON YARN 


Decrease in breaking strength 
per 1% increase in regain 

Decrease in breaking strength 

per 1% increase in relative humidity 

Increase in ultimate elongation 
per 1 % increase in regain 

Increase in ultimate elongation 

per 1 % increase in relative humidity 

Figure I. 


.054 gram per denier 


.010 gram per denier 


1 . 0 % 


0.17% 



Elongation in Per Cent 







■ 


South wick Hall 



SERIES >9, NO. I. 


February , 1986 


BULLETIN 

of the 

Lowell Textile Institute 

LOWELL, MASS. 


Issued Quarterly 


1936 


Entered August 26, 1902, at Lowell, Mass., as second-class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 
Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917, authorized October 21, 1918 


Moody Street and Colonial Avenue 


Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 


6100. 2- 36. Order 6781. 


CALENDAR 

1935-1936 

September 12-13, Thursday-Friday . . . Entrance Examinations 
September 16-21, Monday-Saturday . . . Re-examinations 

September 19, Thursday, 9.00 a.m Registration for Freshmen 

September 23, Monday Registration for upper-class students 

Classes begin for Freshmen 

September 24, Tuesday Classes begin for upper-class students 

November 11, Monday Armistice Day — Holiday 

November 26, Tuesday, 4.45 p.m Thanksgiving recess begins 

December 2, Monday, 9.00 a.m Thanksgiving recess ends 

December 20, Friday, 4.45 p.m Christmas recess begins 

January 6, Monday, 9.00 a.m Christmas recess ends 

January 20, Monday First term examinations begin 

January 31, Friday End of first term 


February 3, Monday .... 
April 3, Friday, 4.45 p.m. . . 
April 13, Monday, 9.00 a.m. . 
April 20, Monday 

May 25, Monday 

May 30, Saturday ..... 

June 9, Tuesday 

June 11-12, Thursday-Friday 


Second term begins 
Spring recess begins 
Spring recess ends 
Holiday — Observance of Patriots’ 
Day 

Second-term examinations begin 
Memorial Day — Holiday 
Commencement 
Entrance Examinations 


1936-1937 


September 10-11, Thursday-Friday . . . 
September 14-19, Monday-Saturday . . . 

September 17, Thursday, 9.00 a.m 

September 21, Monday 

September 22, Tuesday 

October 12, Monday 

November 12, Thursday 

November 24, Tuesday, 4.45 p.m 

November 30, Monday, 9.00 a.m 

December 18, Friday, 4.45 p.m 

January 4, Monday, 9.00 a.m 

January 18, Monday 

January 29, Friday 

February 1, Monday 

February 22, Monday 

April 16, Friday, 4.45 p.m 

April 26, Monday, 9.00 a.m 

May 24, Monday 

May 31, Monday 

June 8, Tuesday 

June 10-11, Thursday-Friday 


Entrance Examinations 
Re-examinations 
Registration for Freshmen 
Registration for upper-class students 
Classes begin for Freshmen 
Classes begin for upper-class students 
Columbus Day — Holiday 
Armistice Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 
Christmas recess ends 
First term examinations begin 
End of first term 

Second term begins 
Washington’s Birthday — Holiday 
Spring recess begins 
Spring recess ends . 

Second term examinations begin 
Holiday — Observance of Memorial 
Day 

Commencement 
Entrance Examinations 


3 

TRUSTEES OF THE LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

Officers 

ROYAL P. WHITE, Chairman 

THOMAS T. CLARK, Vice-Chairman CHARLES H. EAMES, Clerk 

Trustees 

On the Part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
James G. Reardon, Commissioner of Education 

On the Part of the City of Lowell 
Hon. Dewey G. Archambault, Mayor of Lowell 

For Term ending June 30, 1936 
Royal P. White, Lowell, class of 1904 
Edward B. Wentworth, 165 Summer Street, Malden, Mass. 

Philip S. Marden, Lowell, Editor-in-Chief, Courier-Citizen 
Charles W. Churchill, Lowell, Manager, Churchill Manufacturing Company, 
Inc., class of 1906 

Tracy A. Adams, North Adams, Vice-President and General Manager, Arnold 
Print Works, class of 1911 

For Term ending June 30, 1937 

Thomas T. Clark, North Billerica, Treasurer, Talbot Mills, class of 1910 
George M. Harrigan, Lowell, President, Lowell Trust Company 
Stanley H. Wheelock, Uxbridge, President and Treasurer, Stanley Woolen 
Company, class of 1905 

Vincent M. McCartin, Lowell, Superintendent of Public Schools 
John A. Calnin, Lowell, Superintendent of Weaving, United States Bunting 
Company 

For Term Ending June 30, 1938 

John A. Connor, Lowell, Superintendent of John C. Meyer Thread Company 
Charles J. McCarty, Lowell, Advertising Solicitor, Courier-Citizen Company 
Philip L. Scannell, Lowell, Treasurer, Lowell Iron & Steel Company 
Mrs. Lillian Slattery, 720 Washington Street, Brighton 
John H. Corcoran, Cambridge, President of J. H. Corcoran & Company, Inc. 


Royal P. White 
Thomas T. Clark 

John A. Connor 

Thomas T. Clark 

Tract A. Adams 

Edward B. Wentworth 

Philip L. Scannell 

Charles W. Churchill 

Vincent M. McCartin 


General Committees 

Finance Committee 
Edward B. Wentworth 

Cotton and Knitting 
Charles W. Churchill 

Woolen and Worsted 
Stanley H. Wheelock 

Chemistry and Dyeing 
Stanley H. Wheelock 

Designing and Finishing 
John A. Calnin 
John A. Connor 

Engineering 
Charles J. McCarty 

Athletics 

Charles J. McCarty 
John H. Corcoran 

Evening School 
George M. Harrigan 


Charles W. Churchill 
John H. Corcoran 

Lillian Slattery 

John A. Calnin 

Philip L. Scannell 

Lillian Slattery 

Thomas T. Clark 

Philip S. Marden 

John A. Calnin 


4 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Charles Holmes Eames, S.B Billerica 

President 

Louis Atwell Olney, S.B., M.S., Sc.D 118 Riverside Street 

Professor of Chemistry; in charge of Department of Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring 

Edgar Harrison Barker 9 Mount Hope Street 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Wool Yarns 

Arthur Andrew Stewart 124 Luce Street 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Finishing 

Hermann Henry Bachmann 146 Parkview Avenue 

Professor of Textile Design; in charge of Department of Design and Weaving 

Lester Howard Cushing, A.B., Ed.M 10 Walden Street 

Professor of History and Economics ; in charge of Department of Languages, 
History and Economics; Secretary of the Faculty; Director of Athletics 
and Physical Education 

Herbert James Ball, S.B., B.C.S 119 Wentworth Avenue 

Professor of Textile Engineering; in charge of Department of Textile Engi- 
neering and Accountancy 

Gilbert Roscoe Merrill, B.T.E 364 Varnum Avenue 

Professor of Textiles; in charge of Department of Cotton Yarns and Knitting 

Stewart Mackay North Chelmsford 

Assistant Professor of Textile Design 

John Charles Lowe, B.T.E 161 Dracut Street 

Assistant Professor of Textiles 

Martin John Hoellrich 30 Saxonia Avenue, Lawrence 

Assistant Professor of Weaving 

Elmer Edward Fickett, B.S 162 Hovey Street 

Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry 

Frederick Steere Beattie, Ph.B 285 Foster Street 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

Harold Canning Chapin, Ph.D 290 Pine Street 

Assistant Professor of General Chemistry 

Charles Lincoln Howarth, B.T.C North Billerica 

Assistant Professor of Dyeing 

Percy Charles Judd, B.S 156 Methuen Street 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Harry Chamberlain Brown, S.B 272 Merrimack Street 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

James Guthrie Dow, A.B 11 Robbins Street 

Assistant Professor of English 

Cornelius Leonard Glen R. F. D. No. 1, Lowell 

Assistant Professor of Finishing 

A. Edwin Wells, B.T.E 204 Franklin Street, Melrose Highlands 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Russell Lee Brown, B.TJE 59 Bradstreet Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Textiles 

Charles Harrison Jack 71 Canton Street 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

Ruth Foote, A.B., S.B 46 Victoria Street 

Instructor and Registrar 

Albert Greaves Sugden . 673 School Street 

Instructor in Weaving 

Arthur Joseph Woodbury 41 Morey Street 

Instructor in Cotton Yams 

Russell Metcalf Fox 359 Beacon 8treet 

Instructor in Textile Design 

Charles Arthur Everett, B:T.C Chelmsford 

Instructor in Dyeing 


5 


Jambs Harrington Kennedy, Jr 177 A Street 

Instructor in Wool Yams and Sorting 

William George Chace, Ph.B 52 Tenth Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

John Leslie Merrill, B.T.E 2026 Middlesex Street 

Instructor in Weaving 

John Henry Skinkle, S.B 52 Tenth Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Franz Evron Baker, B.T.E Dalton Hoad, Chelmsford 

Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Charles Frederick Edlund, B.S 272 Merrimack Street 

Instructor in Sales Engineering 

Milton Hindle, B.T.E 24 Highland Avenue, Melrose Highlands 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

Horton Brown, BB 178 Atlantic Avenue, Marblehead 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Waldo Ward Yarnall 157 Nesmith Street 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Elmer Percy Trevors 18 Rhodora Street 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Paul David Petterson East Chelmsford 

Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

de Gruchy, James Campbell 61 Pleasant Street, Stoneham 

Student Instructor in Chemistry 

Robert Frederick Jessen 298 Pawtucket Street 

Student Instructor in Cotton Yarns 

Emilio Gomez Moreno, Jr Graniteville 

Student Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

Lee Gale Johnston Haverhill 

Student Instructor in Chemistry 

Walter Ballard Holt 37 Albert Street 

Bursar 

Florence Moore Lancey 46 Victoria Street 

Librarian 

Helen Gray Flack, S.B 445 Stevens Street 

Secretary 

Mona Blanche Palmer 685 Westford Street 

Clerk 

Miriam Kaplan Hoffman, S.B 64 Tyler Park 

Clerk 


HISTORICAL SKETCH 
of the 

LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

By virtue of legislative acts of 1928, the Lowell Textile School became known as 
the Lowell Textile Institute in order to define more clearly the standing of the 
institution. This was the natural result of the development of the original ideas 
and policies of the trustees who founded the Lowell Textile School. The articles 
of incorporation were authorized by Chapter 475, Acts of 1895, and provided for 
a corporation to be known as the Trustees of the Lowell Textile School of Lowell, 
Massachusetts. The movement for the establishment of the school dates from 
June 1, 1891, but it was not opened for instruction until February 1, 1897. 

In accordance with the acts of incorporation the Board of Trustees consisted of 
twenty permanent and self-perpetuating members, three-fourths of whom must 
be “actively engaged in, or connected with, textile or kindred manufactures.” In 
addition, his Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Commissioner of Education of 
the State, the mayor, the president of the municipal council, the superintendent 
of schools of Lowell, and a representative of the textile council were members ex- 
officio. Legislative acts of 1905 and 1906 authorized the graduates of the school to 
elect four trustees serving for periods of four years each. 

By virtue of the anti-aid amendment to the State Constitution, and by Chapter 
274, General Acts of 1918, the property of the school was transferred on July 1, 
1918, to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the control and management 
of the school was vested in a Board of Trustees appointed by the Governor, “with 
all the powers, rights and privileges and subject to all the duties” of the original 
Board. 

In locating the Institute at Lowell, which has been called the “Mother Textile 
City of America,” considerable advantage is secured by close association with 
every branch of the industry, which utilizes almost every commercial fiber in the 
products of the great Merrimack Valley textile district. 

Although the school was formally opened by Governor Roger Wolcott on Jan- 
uary 30, 1897, in rented quarters in the heart of the city, it was not until January, 
1903, that the first buildings of the present plant were ready for occupancy. On 
February 12, 1903, Governor John L. Bates dedicated the present buildings. 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE INSTITUTE 

The object of the establishment of the Institute as set forth in the original act 
was “for the purpose of instruction in the theory and practical art of textile and 
kindred branches of industry.” 

The plan was occasioned by the apparent crisis in the leading industry of New 
England, due to the rapid development of the manufacture of the coarser cotton 
fabrics in the southern states. It was believed that this crisis could be met only 
by a wider and more thorough application of the sciences and arts in the pro- 
duction of finer and more varied fabrics. 

Following the general methods and systems found successful at the higher poly- 
technic institutes, it offers thorough instruction in the principles of the sciences and 
arts applicable to textile and kindred branches of industry. The courses treat 
not only of the theory but also the application of these principles in the processes, 
on the machines and throughout all departments of industry involved in the 
successful manufacture, application and distribution of textile material in any 
form. 

Though from the first the management has kept in view the clearly defined 
objective which called for the establishment of the Institute, it has developed its 
curriculum, its methods of instruction, and equipment as the needs of the industry 
arose. This objective will be kept constantly in view, and as new demands are 
presented an effort will be made to extend courses, equipment and floor space. 
The mechanical equipment of the Institute includes the best makes of textile 
machinery, and these machines, while built as they would be for regular work, 
are, as far as possible, adapted to the experimental work which is of particular 
value in such an institution as this. 

Because of the breadth, grade and character of instruction given, and because 


7 

of the standing and personnel of the instructing staff, the Institute has been placed 
by both Federal and State educational boards in the class of the higher technological 
schools of this country. 

The United States Civil Service Commission recognizes graduates from the 
degree courses of this school as proper applicants for the examination to the various 
positions requiring a knowledge of applied science and engineering, as well as a 
knowledge of textile manufacturing, in the different departments of the govern- 
ment. 

The day classes have been organized for those who can devote their entire time 
for three or more years to the instruction requisite in preparing to enter the textile 
industries. It has been found necessary to require of all such students educational 
qualifications equivalent to those given by a regular four-year course of a high 
school or academy of good standing. 

The evening classes are held for about twenty weeks of the year, and are for 
those who are unable to attend the day courses. These are similar to the day 
courses, but are aimed especially to meet the needs of students working during 
the day in the mills and shops. For entrance to these classes an applicant should 
have the equivalent of a grammar school education. A detailed description of 
these courses and requirements is given in another Bulletin, which will be sent 
upon request. 


BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The site is a commanding one, consisting of about 15 acres at a high elevation 
on the west bank of the Merrimack River. It extends to and overlooks the rapids 
of Pawtucket Falls, which was the first water power in America to be used on an 
extensive scale to operate power looms. It was contributed by Frederick Fanning 
Ayer, Esq., of New York City, and the Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on the 
Merrimack River. 

South wick Hall, the main building, fronting on Moody Street, was contributed 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Frederick Fanning Ayer, Esq., and 
is a memorial to Royal Southwick, a leading textile manufacturer, a public man 
of earlier days, and a maternal ancestor of Mr. Ayer. It includes a central mass 
90 by 90 feet, having three stories and two wings 80 by 85 feet each with two 
stories and well-lighted basements. The building is pierced in the center by an 
arched way from which access is had to the wings and to the central courtyard. 
The northern wing is occupied by the General Offices, Engineering and Finishing 
Departments, and Library, while the southern wing is occupied by the Chemistry 
and Dyeing Departments. 

Kitson Hall, dedicated to the memory of Richard Kitson, was contributed by 
Charlotte P. Kitson and Emma K. Stott, his daughters; the Kitson Machine 
Company of Lowell, founded by Mr. Kitson, was also a generous contributor. 
This hall makes a right angle with Southwick Hall, is 70 by 183 feet, has two stories 
and a basement and houses the Cotton Yarn and Knitting Departments, the 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering laboratories and the Machine Shop. 

The Falmouth Street Building forms the third side of the quadrangle, and con- 
sists of three portions, one 60 by 75 feet, three stories, one 75 by 130 feet, three 
stories, and the head house 70 by 80 feet, three stories and basement. The build- 
ing is occupied by the picker section of the Cotton Yarn Department, the Design 
and Power Weaving Department and by the Woolen and Worsted Yarn Depart- 
ment, and contains on the lower floors an equipment for the manufacture of wool 
yarn from the fleece to the finished yarn. The upper floors are occupied by a great 
variety of plain, dobby and Jacquard looms, and in a section of the building are 
the students’ lockers and recreation rooms. 

Colonial Avenue Building was erected in the summer of 1910 from plans pre- 
pared by the Engineering Department, which also had in charge the work of 
construction. The building completes the fourth side of the quadrangle, and in 
outward appearance corresponds to the architectural features of the other school 
buildings. It is a single-story building, and has the dimensions of 195 by 60 feet. 
Its interior is faced with cement brick made at the school during the progress of the 
work. These serve to give light-reflecting walls which are advantageous for the 
work of the Wool Manufacturing, Cotton Finishing and Chemistry and Dyeing 


8 

Departments that occupy this building. The funds for this building were provided 
by the State of Massachusetts. 

The buildings are of modern mill construction adapted to educational uses and 
contain approximately 181,294 square feet. 

CAMPUS 

Through the generosity of Mr. Frederick Fanning Ayer the Institute has been 
provided with a campus and athletic field of about 3 acres. This has been care- 
fully graded and laid out for baseball, football and track athletics. 

To enclose this field the Alumni Class Fence has been partly built. It is made 
of forged iron sections supported between brick columns. Each section is con- 
tributed by a class, so that in the course of a few years this fence will entirely 
enclose the field. 

On the upper floor of the Falmouth Street Building there has been provided a 
recreation room for the use of the students at such times as their attendance is 
not required in classes. 

In the basement of this building there are rooms for the use of the athletic 
teams. Connected to these are showers and dressing rooms. 

The upper hall of South wick Hall has been equipped with gymnastic apparatus. 
Chest weights, wooden dumb-bells, Indian clubs, a set of traveling rings, a vaulting 
horse, parallel bars, a punching bag and several sets of foils and single sticks have 
been provided. 

In order to be sure that no student having any dangerous physical weakness 
takes part in any athletic contest, all candidates for the various athletic teams 
are obliged to pass a satisfactory physical examination. 


9 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Particular stress should be laid upon a thorough grounding in mathematics, 
including algebra, arithmetic and plane geometry, as these form the basis upon 
which the work of this school rests. While solid geometry is not required at the 
present time, the student will find a knowledge of this subject very valuable in his 
subsequent work, and is strongly recommended to include this subject as one of 
his electives. A preliminary course in science, including physics and chemistry, 
serves to prepare the students mind for the higher branches of these subjects and 
their application, but neither will be considered as the equivalent of the courses in 
these branches given in the Institute. 

Degree Courses 

Candidates for admission to either of the degree courses must be graduates of 
a school approved by the New England College Entrance Certificate Board or 
by the board of Regents of New York, and must present a certificate from the 
principal of the school last attended, reporting upon the subjects pursued and 
the points obtained according to the schedule of studies given hereafter. A total 
of fifteen points is required. 

A point represents satisfactory work in a year’s study in a specified subject in 


an approved secondary school. 

Required Subjects 

Algebra A1 1 

Algebra A2 1 

English 4 

Language other than English 2 

Plane Geometry 1 

History (American, Medieval and Modern, or English) 1 

Physics 1 

11 

• Elective Subjects Points 

Chemistry 1 

Elementary French (two years) orl 2 

Elementary German (two years) J 

Advanced French or German (one year in addition to requirements of Ele- 
mentary French A or Elementary German A) 1 

History: 

American 1 

Medieval and Modern 1 

English 1 

Latin 1 

Mechanical Drawing 1 

Mechanic Arts 1 

Solid Geometry 1 

Spanish 1 

Trigonometry . 1 


An applicant may also be admitted on the basis of entrance examinations, in 
which case he must pass a sufficient number of the required subjects to make 
ten points and present certificates showing satisfactory courses in such of the 
elective subjects to make three additional points. 

The objective of the elective requirements is to encourage greater breadth of 
preparation than that covered by the required branches. Certificates covering 
other subjects than those listed as elective will be entertained. 

Diploma Courses 

Candidates for admission to the diploma courses are accepted upon presentation 
of properly vouched certificates showing the completion of a regular four-year 
course in a high school or academy of reputable standing. The certificate must 
specify that the applicant has satisfactorily passed the required subjects. 

A total of twelve points is required. 


10 

Required Subjects Points 

Algebra A1 1 

Algebra A2 1 

English 4 

Plane Geometry 1 

History (American, Medieval and Modern, or English) 1 

Physics 1 


Elective Subjects 

Three may be selected from the list under Degree Courses. 


9 


ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

All students who are unable to present a certificate for either the degree or the 
diploma courses must pass entrance examinations. Notification of intention to 
take these examinations must be made in writing at least a week before the date 
of the examinations. These will be held as follows: — 

Thursday, June 11, 1936; Thursday, September 10, 1936 ; Thursday, June 10, 1937: — 
Algebra, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

History, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

English, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Friday, June 12, 1936; Friday, September 11, 1936; Friday, June 11, 1937: — 
Plane Geometry, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

German or French, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Physics, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Candidates failing to pass the June examinations are allowed to try again in 
September; those who cannot attend the June examinations may present them- 
selves in September. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS FOR ENTRANCE 

Algebra Al. — Derivation and use of simple formulas, graphical representation, 
the meaning and use of negative numbers, linear equations, with one or two un- 
known quantities, ratio and proportion, the essentials of algebraic technique, 
simple cases of exponents and radicals. 

Algebra A2. — Numerical and literal quadratic equations in one unknown 
quantity, the binomial theorem for positive integral exponents, arithmetic and 
geometric series, simultaneous linear equations in three unknown quantities, 
simultaneous equations consisting of one quadratic and including graphical solu- 
tions, exponents and radicals. 

Plane Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good textbooks, 
including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures, the circle and the 
measurement of angles, similar polygons, areas, regular polygons, and the measure- 
ment of the circle. The solution of original problems and problems in mensuration 
of lines and plane surfaces. 

English. — As secondary schools are following to a greater extent than here- 
tofore the requirements of the College Entrance Examination Board, it is recom- 
mended that the applicant to this school conform to the suggestions of this Board 
relative to English composition and literature. 

The examination consists of two parts, both of which are given at the same 
time. 

(а) With the object of testing the student’s ability to express his thoughts 
in writing clearly and correctly he will be required to write upon subjects familiar 
to him. Emphasis will be laid upon the composition, punctuation, grammar, 
idiom and formation of paragraphs. He will be judged by how well he writes 
rather than by how much he writes. 

(б) The second part of the examination is prepared with the view of ascertaining 
the extent of the student’s knowledge of good literature, and to test this examina- 
tion questions will be based on the books adopted by the National Conference on 
Uniform Entrance Requirements. Any course of equivalent amount if made up 
of standard works will be accepted. 


11 

History. — Applicants may offer a preparation of American history, English 
history, or medieval and modern history. 

In American history applicants should be familiar with the early settlements 
in America, the colonies, their government, the customs of the people, and events 
which led to the establishment of the United States. They should be informed 
concerning the causes and effects of the principal wars in which the country has 
been involved. They should be prepared to consider also questions requiring an 
elementary knowledge of civil government, as well as historical facts connected 
with the growth of this country up to the present time. 

For the subject of English history or medieval and modern history the course 
given in any reputable secondary school should give proper preparation. A course 
extending over a full year with not less than three periods a week will be accepted. 

Physics. — The applicant should be familiar with the fundamental principles of 
physics, particularly those considered under the headings of mechanics, heat, light, 
electricity and magnetism. Textbook instruction should be supplemented by 
lecture table experiments. Wherever possible, the student should pursue a lab- 
oratory course, but for the present no applicant will be conditioned in this subject 
if he has not been able to carry on a laboratory course. Where a laboratory course 
is offered by a secondary school, it should cover at least twenty-five of those exper- 
iments listed in the syllabus of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Modern Languages. — Required for degree courses only. It is expected that 
the work in these subjects has covered a period of at least two years of preparatory 
school training or the equivalent. Importance should be given to the ability to 
translate into good idiomatic English, but attention should also be paid to gram- 
mar and construction, that greater care may be used in translation. 

Elementary German A. — The entrance examination is composed of two 
parts, both taken, however, at the same time. 

(а) Translation of simple German prose into good idiomatic English. 

(б) Questions to test proficiency in grammar, and simple English sentences to 
be rendered into German. 

The requirements include the declension of articles, adjectives, pronouns and 
nouns; the conjugation and inflection of weak and strong verbs; the simpler uses 
of the subjunctive; the use of the modal auxiliaries; the prepositions and their 
uses; the principal parts of important verbs; and the elementary rules of syntax 
and word order. 

Texts used in the language courses of any reputable high or preparatory school 
will furnish reading for translation. A list of texts is offered by the College En- 
trance Examination Board. 

Elementary French A. — The entrance examination is composed of two parts, 
both taken, however, at the same time. 

(а) Translation of simple French prose into good idiomatic English. 

(б) Questions to test proficiency in grammar, and simple English sentences 
to be rendered into French. 

The requirements include the principal parts, conjugation and inflection of the 
regular and the more common irregular verbs; the singular and plural forms of 
nouns and adjectives; the uses of articles and partitive construction; the forms 
and positions of personal pronouns; and the simpler uses of the conditional and 
subjunctive. 

Suitable texts are suggested by the language courses of any reputable high or 
preparatory school and by the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

Students who have pursued two years of elementary French as well as two 
years of elementary German may present one subject to cover two points in the 
required subjects, and the other to cover two points in the elective subjects. 

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

History. — If the applicant can present all three or any two branches of history 
specified he may include one as a required subject and the others in the list of 
elective subjects. 

Chemistry. — Applicants must show evidence of their familiarity with the 
rudiments of chemistry. Any course given in a secondary school organized to 


12 

present instruction by means of textbook or lecture, together with correlated 
laboratory work, will be considered as covering the requirements. The applicant’s 
notebook with his original notes, including description of experiment, apparatus 
used, reactions, observations and deductions, must be accompanied by his in- 
structor’s certificate. 

Importance will be placed upon manipulation and deductions as well as the 
general appearance and neatness of the notebook. 

Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good textbooks, 
including the relations of planes and lines in space, the properties and measure- 
ment of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones; the sphere and spherical triangles. 
The solution of original problems and the applications of the mensuration of 
surfaces and solids. 

Trigonometry. — The usual courses of instruction covered by the standard 
textbooks on plane and spherical trigonometry will prepare an applicant suf- 
ficiently to meet this requirement. 

Mechanical Drawing. — The applicant must have pursued such a course in 
mechanical drawing that he will be familiar with the usual geometrical construction 
problems, projection of points, fines, planes and simple solids. 

Importance is laid not only upon the accuracy with which the work is per- 
formed, but upon the general arrangement, appearance and care with which 
the plates are executed. 

It should not be understood that work in this subject may be offered as the 
equivalent of the first term’s work at the Institute. 

Mechanics Arts. — The usual courses offered by properly equipped preparatory 
schools will be accepted as suitable fulfilment of this requirement. Work should 
include instruction in the handling of both wood and metal working tools in the 
more simple practices of these arts. 

Elementary French B. — Applicants who enter for one of the three-year 
courses may present one year’s work in French in a secondary school. Those 
who present themselves for examination in this subject should be familiar with 
the rudiments of grammar, and be able to translate simple French prose into 
good idiomatic English, also to translate into French English sentences, based on 
the French given for translation. 

Elementary German B. — Applicants who enter for one of the three-year 
courses may present one year’s work in German in a secondary school. What is 
stated in regard to French applies to those who may present German instead of 
French. 

Advanced French or German. — In cases where applicants have pursued 
courses in French or German for more than two years, and have completed work 
which is more advanced than is included under elementary French or German 
they may offer the additional year as an elective. 

Spanish. — Students offering Spanish should be familiar with elementary 
grammar, the common irregular verbs, and be able to translate simple Spanish to 
English or English to Spanish. A preparation equivalent to three periods per 
week for two years will be acceptable. 

Latin. — Students who have pursued one or more years of Latin may pre- 
sent this subject as an elective. Each year’s work satisfactorily completed will 
be considered equal to one point. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates who may have received previous training in any of the subjects 
scheduled in the regular course will, upon presentation of acceptable certificates, 
be given credit for such work. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Degree Courses. — The four-year degree courses are as follows: 

Textile Engineering. 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring. 

At the completion of these courses the degrees of Bachelor of Textile Engineering 
(B.T.E.) and Bachelor of Textile Chemistry (B.T.C.) are conferred. 


13 

Five options are offered in the Engineering Course, viz., general textile, cotton 
manufacturing, wool manufacturing, design, or sales option. Each of these courses 
is planned to train one in the fundamental principles of science found to be appli- 
cable in the particular fields of textile chemistiy and textile engineering. It is 
maintained that for one to be successful in either of these important branches of 
industry a training is required as thorough and broad as that of any of the recog- 
nized branches of engineering or of applied science. 

With this in mind these courses have been built of a secure framework of science 
and mathematics, and to it has been added the useful application of these branches 
in the broad textile field. With the direct purpose of laying a secure foundation 
in the training, a more extended preparatory course is first demanded, and subse- 
quently in the school work more subjects of a general character are included, that 
narrowness of judgment and observation may not result by overstimulation of the 
technical development. 

Diploma Courses. — The following courses extend over a period of three years 
and upon the completion of any one of these the diploma of the Institute is awarded : 

Cotton Manufacture. 

Wool Manufacture. 

Textile Design. 

These are the original courses offered at the Institute, arranged to require three 
years* study and to give the student as thorough a training as possible for his 
chosen field, stressing particularly the study of textiles. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Although all classes are open to women, the courses which have appealed es- 
pecially to their tastes have been textile designing and decorative art. Some have 
pursued courses in chemistry, and have added to their work in design some in- 
struction in power weaving and finishing. In general these special courses have 
been followed for three years and in some cases have led the students to positions 
either in the mill office or in some commercial lines that have been desirable and 
have offered congenial work. 

Within the last few years the possibilities for women in certain branches of 
textile chemistry have become recognized and it is believed that in the future 
the positions open to them will become more and more numerous. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

By act of the General Court of 1935, authority was given to the Lowell Textile 
Institute to confer degrees of Master of Science in Textile Chemistry and Master 
of Science in Textile Engineering to graduate students who satisfactorily complete 
courses of advanced standing. 

The obj ect of the courses is to offer to properly qualified graduates of the Institute 
who hold bachelor degrees an opportunity to pursue advanced courses in their 
respective department and to take work in other departments. It is also the obj ect 
to offer to properly qualified graduates holding bachelor degrees of other institu- 
tions of higher learning an opportunity to carry on courses in textile education that 
will prepare them for entrance to that industry. 

Graduates of this Institute will be required to devote at least one year residential 
study and graduates in general of other institutions at least two years residential 
study in order to receive the Master degree. Admission to advanced standing 
may be permitted where the applicant can present work which is approved by the 
department head as equivalent. 

The tuition fees and deposits for graduate students shall be the same as those 
required for undergraduates. . In general a graduate of this Institute shall devote 
approximately one third of his course to subj ects of advanced character in his own 
department. One third of his course may be in subj ects of his own or other depart- 
ments not taken in undergraduate work and the remaining third of his course shall 
be occupied in a thesis of an advanced character and approved by the head of the 
department. 

# The courses of study for graduates of other colleges and technological institu- 
tions cannot be prescribed in detail for the reason that the selection must depend 
upon previous scholastic work and standing. They must include the essential 


14 

subjects of textile education required in the particular department which the appli- 
cant elects and must receive the approval of the department head as well as the 
President and Faculty. 

Students with proper preparation may be admitted to advanced courses but 
cannot be candidates for degrees unless they fulfill the above described requirements. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application for Admission. — A blank form of application for admission may 
be found at the end of this bulletin. This should be properly filled out by all ap- 
plicants, whether entering upon certificate from a secondary school or presenting 
themselves for examination. 

Freshman Registration. — Each freshman is expected to be in daily attendance 
beginning Thursday, September 17, at 9.00 a.m., and to follow the prepared program 
which will be placed in his hands. A program which is planned to acquaint the 
new student with the institution, its location and surroundings, its courses of 
instruction, its recreational activities and other phases of its life is arranged for 
the opening week. Unless arrangements for room and board are made previously, 
the first two days of the week may be used for this purpose. Physical examinations 
as well as certain other tests are given during this orientation period. Freshman 
week enables the student to secure the advantages which come from acquaintance 
with his surroundings, his instructors, the members of his class, student organiza- 
tions, activities and customs. The overcrowding of the first week of classes with 
distractions is thus avoided. 

Registration, — All upper classmen are required to register on or before the 
Monday of the week beginning the school year, and all students during the midyear 
examination period. For unexcused delay in registration a fee of $5 will be imposed. 

Sessions. — The regular school sessions are in general from 9.00 a.m. to 
12.50 p.m., and from 1.55 to 4.45 p.m., except Saturdays, when no classes are held. 
On Saturday afternoons the buildings are closed. 

An hour plan designates the hours at which the various classes meet. This is 
rigidly adhered to, and the student is marked for his attendance and work as 
therein scheduled. 

Attendance. — Attendance is required of all students on fourteen-fifteenths 
of all scheduled class exercises, provided they meet the requirements of their 
instructors for the omitted exercises. For every unexcused absence from any class 
exercise in excess of those allowed, a deduction will be made from the mark obtained 
in the course in which the absences occurred. 

Advisers. — Advisers are appointed for all students, to be of such aid and as- 
sistance as they can both inside and outside of school hours. The head of the 
department in which a student is registered is adviser to upper-classmen, and 
instructors in charge of freshmen classes act as advisers to freshmen. 

Conduct. — Students are required to return to the proper place all instru- 
ments or apparatus used in experimental work, and to leave clean and in working 
order all machinery and apparatus with which they may experiment. All break- 
ages, accidents or irregularities of any kind must be reported immediately to the 
head of the department or instructor in charge. 

Irregular attendance, lack of punctuality, neglect of either school or home work, 
disorderly or ungentlemanly conduct or general insubordination are considered 
good and sufficient reasons for the immediate suspension of a student, and a report 
to the trustees for such action as they deem necessary to take. 

It is the aim of the trustees so to administer the discipline of the Institute as to 
maintain a high standard of integrity and a scrupulous regard for trust. The 
attempt of any student to present, as his own, work which he has not performed, 
or to pass an examination by improper means, is regarded by the trustees as a 
most serious offense, and renders the offender liable to immediate suspension or 
expulsion. The aiding or abetting of a student in any dishonesty is also held to 
be a grave breach of discipline. 

Any student who violates these provisions will be immediately suspended by 
the president, and the case reported at the following meeting of the trustees for 
action. 


15 

Examinations. — For first-year students examinations are held every five 
weeks, and these serve to inform the student concerning his standing and the 
progress made. 

For students in upper classes examinations will be held during the eighth week 
of each term. 

Final examinations are held at the end of each term. 

In general, the examinations cover the work of the preceding term, but at the 
discretion of the instructor may include work of earlier terms. 

Examinations for students conditioned in first-term subjects are held during 
the second term, and examinations for students conditioned in the second-term 
subjects are held in September following. Students requesting condition examina- 
tions at other than scheduled dates will be required to pay $5 for each examination 
so taken. 

Any student who fails to complete a subject satisfactorily or to clear a condition 
at the time appointed, will be required to repeat the subject, and he cannot be 
admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

A student whose term’s standing is as a whole so low that he cannot continue 
with profit the work of the next term will be required to leave, but he may return 
the following year to repeat such subjects as are required. 

Daily work and regularity of attendance are considered in making up the reports 
of standing. 

Records and Reports of Standing. — During each term informal reports are 
sent to parents or guardians and to all students; and at the end of each term formal 
reports ate made. 

The daily work of the student forms an important part of his record, and no 
pupil will be awarded the diploma or degree unless this portion of his record is 
clear. 

Books are prescribed for study, for entry of lecture notes and other exercises, 
and are periodically examined by the lecturers. The care and accuracy with which 
these books are kept are considered in determining standing. 

Thesis. — Each candidate for the degree of the Institute must file with the head 
of the department in which the thesis is taken, and not later than May 15, a report 
of original investigation or research, written on a good quality of paper, by 11 
inches, with one-inch margin at left, and one-half inch at right, of each page; such 
thesis to have been previously approved by the head of the department in which 
it is made. 

For all candidates for the diploma this requirement will be optional on the 
part of the Institute. 

Library and Reading Room. — That the students may have surroundings 
conducive to reading and study a moderate-sized reading room with library tables 
and chairs has been provided. The library shelves contain textile, art, engineering 
and scientific publications. These are increased from time to time as new technical 
books of value to textile students are issued from the press. The leading textile 
papers are kept on file for ready reference. 

FEES, DEPOSITS, ETC. 

Tuition Fee. — The fee for the day course is $150 per year for residents of Massa- 
chusetts. For non-residents the fee for all courses is $200 per year. The fee for 
students from foreign countries is $300 per year. 

Three-fifths of the fee is charged for a single term. Each term’s tuition is payable 
during the first week of that term. Students failing to make this payment at 
the specified time will be excused from classes until satisfactory explanation and 
arrangements for payment can be made. After payment is made no fee or part 
thereof can be returned, except by special action of the trustees. 

Special students pay, in general, the full fee, but if a course be taken involving 
attendance at the school during a limited time, application may be made to the 
president for a reduction. 

Students entering from Massachusetts are required to file with the Bursar a 
statement signed by either town or city clerk, stating that the applicant’s father is 
a legal resident of Massachusetts. 

Athletic Fee. — An athletic fee of $15 is due and payable at the time of the first 
payment of tuition. 


16 

Deposits. — For all first-year students a minimum deposit of $25 is required to 
cover the cost of breakage, supplies, apparatus and chemicals used in the Ghemical 
Laboratory, the unexpended balance to be returned to the student at the end 
of the year. For all students in second, third, and fourth years taking work in 
Chemistry and Dyeing Laboratories a deposit of $25 for the first term and $25 
for the second term is required. 

Students taking Machine Shop will be required to make deposit of $10 to cover 
cost of materials, supplies and breakage, the unexpended balance to be returned at 
the end of the year. 

Students not taking Chemistry Laboratory or Machine Shop will be required 
to make a deposit of $10 each year to cover general breakage. The unexpended 
balance will be returned at the end of the year. 

All deposits must be made before students can be admitted for laboratory work. 

Rooms and Board. — Students from a distance, requiring rooms and board in 
the city, may, if they desire, select same from a list which is kept at the Institute. 
The cost of rooms and board in a good district is $12 per week and upwards. 

Books and Materials. — Students must provide their own books, stationery, 
tools, etc., and pay for any breakage or damage that they cause. The above fee 
includes free admission for any day students desiring to attend any of the evening 
classes in which there is accommodation. 

Each student must provide himself with proper outer garments and wear them 
in such a manner when working in the various laboratories that clothing and per- 
son will be protected and not endangered by moving machinery or chemicals. 

All raw stock and yarn furnished to the students, and all the productions of the 
Institute, remain or become its property, except by special arrangement; but each 
student is allowed to retain specimens of yarn or fabrics that he has produced, if 
mounted and tabulated in accordance with the requirements of the department. 
It is understood that the department may retain such specimens of students’ work 
as they may determine. 

Lockers, sufficiently capacious to contain clothing, books and tools, are provided 
for the use of the students. 

No books, instruments or other property of the Institute are loaned to the stu- 
dents to be removed from the premises except by special permission. 


Summary of Expenses per Year 

Tuition (residents of Massachusetts) $150 

Tuition (residents of other States) 200 

Tuition (foreigners) 300 

Chemistry laboratory deposit (1st year) 25 

Chemistry laboratory deposit (2d, 3d and 4th years) 50 

Athletic fee ^15 

Machine shop deposit * 10 

General breakage fee 10 

(This applies to students who do not take chemistry or machine 
shop.) 

Books and supplies 50 

(Books and supplies for the first year cost about $80, second and 
third year $35, and fourth year $50, thus averaging about $50 per 
year for the four years.) 


SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Louis A. Olney Book Prizes. — Prizes in the form of books are awarded each 
year to the successful candidate on graduation day. The conditions in detail 
are as follows: — 

First — Ten dollars to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the highest scholarship 
in first-year chemistry. 

Second . — Five dollars to the student taking the regular Chemistry and Textile 
Goloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the second highest 
scholarship in first-year chemistry. 

Third . — Ten dollars to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile Color- 


17 

ing Course who shall be considered as having obtained the highest scholarship 
during his second year. 

Fourth . — Five dollars to the regular student of the Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course who shall be considered as having attained the second highest 
scholarship during his second year. 

Fifth . — Ten dollars to the student graduating from the Chemistry and Textile 
Coloring Course, who, in the opinion of the instructing staff of the department, 
shall have maintained the highest scholarship throughout the course. 

The above-mentioned sums are to be invested in books which may be selected 
after graduation. In case no one is considered worthy of any particular scholar- 
ship prize, or if there is no competition, the same may be withheld. The decision 
in such case shall rest with the judges. 

The National Association of Cotton Manufacturers Medal. — The Na- 
tional Association of Cotton Manufacturers offers a medal to that member of the 
graduating class who, during his course, shall have attained the highest standing in 
special subjects required by the vote of the association. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

School Publications. — The Text is issued bi-weekly and it contains news per- 
taining to activities in the Institute as well as information concerning alumni. The 
Pickout is an annual publication in charge of a manager and editor selected from 
the senior class. The board is composed of representatives from the various classes. 

Fraternities. — There are four fraternities, three of which are national and one, 
local. They afford opportunity for social life desired in a college career. 

Dramatic Club. — The Dramatic Club gives a theatrical program annually. 
Appropriation is made from the profits to the treasury of the Athletic Association. 

Professional Clubs. — A Student Section of the American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers holds meetings regularly in accordance with requirements of the 
national organization. The Student Section of the American Society of Dyers and 
Colorists holds meetings at which papers are delivered or speakers come from outside 
the school organization. 

Rifle Club. — The rifle club offers opportunity to all students to attain proficiency 
in marksmanship and selects the team for interscholastic matches with other col- 
leges. 

Honor Society. — To degree candidates who have maintained a high scholar- 
ship for three years’ work, or who have met with certain similar requirements, is 
accorded the honor of membership in the society Tau Epsilon Sigma. Relatively 
a membership in this society corresponds to that in some of the well-known honor 
societies of the liberal arts and scientific colleges. It requires constant attendance 
and appli cation to the work of the course for any student to reach the scholarship 
level entitling him to this membership. 

Honor Roll. — The President’s List includes upper classmen taking a regular 
course who have a general average of eighty percent and no deficiencies. 

Student Book Store. — A book store is operated on the cooperative plan 
by the Lowell Textile Associates, Inc., for the benefit and convenience of stu- 
dents who desire to purchase books, supplies, and other materials for use in 
connection with their work. It is conducted by a manager and two clerks, all 
of whom are undergraduates. The general business policy is under the control 
and supervision of a member of the Faculty. Any student may become an associ- 
ate member of the Lowell Textile Associates, Inc., upon payment of the required 
fee and is thereby entitled to discount privileges when purchasing from the Book 
Store and from certain firms in the city of Lowell. 


18 

Alumni Association. — The Alumni Association of the Institute holds its 
annual meeting and banquet in May of each year. 

The membership of the association is composed of graduates of the day courses 
and is open to any non-graduate who has attended the Institute for at least one 
year. 

Officers for the Year 1935-36 
Harry W. Martin, Tl, President 
Harold W. Leitch, H2 Vice-President 
Arthur A. Stewart, '00, Secretary-Treasurer 

Communications should be addressed to Arthur A. Stewart, Lowell Textile 
Institute. 


Ex-Officio Members of Executive Committee 
Tracy A. Adams, HI Thomas T. Clark, HO 

Charles W. Churchill, '06 Stanley H. Wheelock, *05 

Royal P. White, '04 


Executive Committee 


15 Members 


Roy H. Bradford, *06 
Alexander Campbell, '23 
James F. Dewey, '04 
Parker F. Dunlap, '34 
Russell T. Fisher, H4 
Olin D. Gay, '08 
Thomas Joy, '26 

A. Edwin 


Arnold J. Midwood, '05 
Brackett Parsons, '20 
Richard W. Rawhnson, *31 
Everett B. Rich, 'll 
Henry S. Sawyer, '32 
Dean W. Symmes, '22 
J. Milton Washburn, '21 

i, '20 


19 


SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 

In the column headed “Hours of Exercise” the numbers represent for each 
particular subject the total hours required in school for a period of fifteen weeks. 

The letter and number which follow the subjects indicate the department in 
which the subject is given and the number of the subject in that department. For 
detailed description of the same, see page 34. 

The departments are indicated as follows: — 


Textile Engineering .... B 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring . C 

Textile Design and Power Weaving D 

Languages and History ... E 


Cotton Yarns F 

Woolen and Worsted Yarns . . G 

Finishing H 


By referring to the letter and number indicated under “Preparation” the student 
can ascertain what subjects are necessary in order that he may have a clear under- 
standing of the subject which he is scheduled to take. 


First Year 
First Term 

(Common to all Courses) 


Hours of 
Exercise 

Elementary Chemistry C-10 105 

English E-10 45 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanical Drawing B-13 135 

Physics B-ll 75 

Physical Education 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis D-10 75 

Second Term 

Course Course 

IY VI 

Elementary Chemistry C-10 75 75 

Elementary German E-ll 30 

English E-10 45 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 or B-13a 45 135 

Mathematics B-10 60 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 60 

Physical Education 30 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-ll or C-lla 150 45 

Stoichiometry C-12 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis D-10 - 75 


For second-term subjects in Courses I, II, and III, see pages 21, 23, 25. 


20 


Course I. — Cotton Manufacture 

The Cotton Manufacturing Course is designed for students contemplating a 
career in the manufacturing of cotton yarns, cloth or allied industries, and wishing 
to devote but three years to instruction at the Institute. 

During the first term the studies are common to all courses, and include in- 
struction in mathematics, mechanical drawing, physics, textile design and ele- 
mentary chemistry. 

During the second term, lectures in organic chemistry are given followed by 
lectures in textile chemistry and dyeing the second year. The work in mechanism 
serves as a basis for all future machine and mechanical work, and is followed by 
steam engineering, electricity and mill engineering. The course in textile designing, 
cloth analysis and cloth construction includes lectures on plain, fancy and Jacquard 
weaves, the analysis of all commercial fabrics, and designs for the same. 

Power weaving is taken up during the second and third years. Commencing 
with lectures and practice upon plain looms, the instruction continues with dobby, 
box-loom, and Jacquard weaving. 

A course in knitting taken during the third year includes the manufacture of 
flat goods, hosiery and underwear. Considerable laboratory practice accompanies 
the lecture work, giving the students actual working knowledge of a wide range of 
knitting machines. Instruction in the finishing of cotton fabrics is given by lectures 
and laboratory work, and requires considerable work on standard machines in the 
laboratory. Textile testing, also given in the third year, instructs the student in 
standard methods for physical testing of textile material. 

The course in cotton carding is given in the second year. The instruction 
covers the production of cotton throughout the world, the classing of various cot- 
tons and the various methods of marketing the cotton crop. Particular emphasis 
is given to the American cotton crop. The treatment of cotton in the mil] processes 
covers all the operations preparatory to spinning, for the regular cotton system 
and for the cotton waste systems. Opening, picking, carding, combing, drawing 
and roving are the operations included. Lectures supplement the material available 
in text books in order to have the course up to date. Considerable time is spent in 
the laboratory studying cotton fibers, classing, processing stock and making various 
tests on the adjustment of machines and the effect on the quality of the work 
produced. 

The third year’s work continues that of the second year, with detailed study of 
spinning, spoofing, twisting and winding. Another course gives instruction in mill 
organization, balancing and arranging machinery in the mill. Finally, a brief 
course is given in the use of the microscope and camera in studying various prob- 
lems in cotton manufacture. Laboratory practice supplements the lecture course, 
giving practical operation, adjustment and observation of the machines studied. 
Advanced laboratory work illustrates the methods of study and analysis of the 
more general and complex problems such as are usually handled in the laboratory 
of a textile plant. 

During both the second and third years, particular attention is given to the 
preparation of the various reports in order that the student may learn proper 
methods for presenting data and conclusions resulting from mill studies and tests. 

During the third year, each student makes some original study, usually of a 
technical nature. He must make a formal report of this study satisfactory to the 
faculty before receiving his diploma. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


21 


Course I. — Cotton Manufacture 

[For first term see page 19] 

First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry C-10 . 

. 75 

Physical Education 

30 

English E-10 

. 45 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla 

45 

Machine Drawing B-13 

. 135 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 


Mathematics B-10 .... 

. 60 

D-10 

75 

Mechanism B-12 .... 

. 60 



Second Year. 

First Term 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20 

. 240 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Lect. C-20 

30 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 90 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 


Steam Engineering B-24 . 

. 30 

tion D-20 

90 

Second Year. 

Second Term 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20 

. 225 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 


Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Lect. C— 20 

30 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 150 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 




tion D-20 

75 

Third Year. 

First Term 


Cotton Finishing H-31 . . . 

. 75 

Mill Engineering B-34a 

30 

Cotton Organization F-32 . 

. 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

135 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30 

. 165 

Textile Testing G-31 .... 

30 

Electricity B-31a .... 

. 30 

Thesis F-34. 


Third Year. 

Second Term 


Cotton Finishing H-31 . 

. 75 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

120 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30 

. 210 

Thesis F-34. 


Knitting F-31 

. 120 




22 


Course II. — Wool Manufacture 

The course on wool manufacturing is arranged for those who contemplate a 
career in the manufacture of woolen or worsted fabrics, and can devote but three 
years to the school work. It includes instruction on all of the varied processes 
employed in manipulating the wool fiber to produce yarn and cloth, namely, sort- 
ing, scouring, carding, combing, spinning, designing, weaving, dyeing and finishing. 
The work is carried on by lectures, recitations and practical work in the laboratories. 

Beginning with the second year the details of manipulating wool from the grease 
to the finished yarn is taken up for close study. This includes the. spinning of 
woolen yarn, also worsted yarn, by both the English and the French systems. 
The intermediate processes of sorting, scouring, carding, combing and top-manu- 
facturing are taken in detail and in proper sequence. 

The general chemistry of the first year is followed by a lecture course in the 
second year on textile chemistry and dyeing. 

Textile design, cloth analysis and construction are continued from the first 
year throughout the course, the work being applied especially to woolen and 
worsted goods. Weaving on power looms commences in the second year and con- 
tinues through the third. 

A course in knitting taken during the third year includes the manufacture of 
flat goods, hosiery and underwear. Considerable laboratory practice accompanies 
the lecture work, giving the students actual working knowledge of a wide range of 
knitting machines. 

Lectures on finishing commence with the third year and are augmented by 
extensive practice with the machines in the Finishing Department. 

Work in the Engineering Department extends throughout all three years, and 
includes mechanical drawing, steam engineering and electricity. The practical 
application of the principles studied in these subjects is brought out forcibly in the 
work on mill engineering, where mill design and construction are considered. A 
short course covering methods employed in the testing of fibers, yarns, and cloths, 
together with laboratory work in the manipulation of certain physical apparatus, 
is given in the third year. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


23 


Course II. — Wool Manufacture 

[For first term see page 19] 

First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry 010 . 

. 75 

English E-10 

. 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 . . 

. 135 

Mathematics B-10 .... 

. 60 

Mechanism B-12 .... 

. 60 

Second Year 

Fiber Preparation 020-21 

. 240 

Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 105 

Steam Engineering B-24 . 

. 30 

Second Year. 

Fiber Preparation 020-21 

. 270 

Physics B-23a 

. 45 

Power Weaving D-24 . 

. 120 


Third Year. 

Electricity B-31a 30 

Mill Engineering B-34a ... 30 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 135 

Third Year. 

Knitting F-31 120 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 105 
Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 


Physical Education 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla . 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 
D-10 75 

First Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 75 

Second Term. 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. 020 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 60 

First Term 

Textile Testing 031 .... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 225 
Second Term 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 225 
Thesis. 


75 


24 


Course III. — Textile Design 

The general course in textile design is planned to meet the demand of young 
men for a technical training in the general processes of textile manufacturing, 
but with particular reference to the design and construction of fabrics. To this 
end a foundation is laid in the first year by instruction in the elementary principles 
of designing, decorative art and weaving. That he may later in the course pursue 
to advantage instruction in yarn manufacturing, weaving, dyeing, finishing and 
some engineering problems, a foundation course in mechanics, mathematics and 
chemistry is laid. As the student is required to pursue courses in the yarn de- 
partments, both cotton and wool, he acquires a knowledge of the manufacture of 
cotton yarns from the bale to the yarn, and of woolen and worsted yarns from 
the fleece through the varied processes of manufacturing woolen yarn or worsted 
yarn by both the French and Bradford systems. 

Throughout his entire course he receives instruction in design, cloth analysis 
and construction of all the standard cloths, viz., trouserings, coatings, suitings, 
blankets, velvets, corduroys, plushes, etc. This is followed by advanced work 
in Jacquard designing and weaving, which serves not only to acquaint the student 
with the many kinds of cotton, woolen, worsted and silk fabrics of figured design, 
but stimulates and develops any artistic talent he may possess. Decorative art 
becomes an important part of the work of the second and third years. 

The course in general inorganic and organic chemistry of the first year leads 
to the subject of textile chemistry and dyeing in the second year. 

Power weaving commences with the second year and continues throughout 
the course, and work on all types of looms is required. 

During the third year the student receives instruction in the finishing of cotton 
goods and woolen and worsted cloths. This instruction is given by means of 
lecture and laboratory work. 

The engineering subjects given in the second and third years are intended to 
acquaint the student with such general knowledge as will be of assistance should 
he be called upon in later life to be a mill manager, or should his subsequent progress 
lead to some executive position in the operation of a textile plant. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 



Course'j.111. — TextileJDesign 

[For first term see page 19] 

First Year. Second Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Elementary Chemistry C-10 . . 75 

English E-10 45 

Machine Drawing B-13 . . . 135 

Mathematics B-10 60 

Mechanism B-12 60 

Second Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 90 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 90 

Steam Engineering B-24 ... 30 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20-21 . . 90 

Jacquard Design D-23 .... 45 

Physics B-23a 45 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 120 

Third Year. 

Color and ^Dynamic Symmetry 

D-33 . 30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 60 

Third Year. 

Cotton Finishing H-31 . . . .75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Jacquard Design D-31 . . . .75 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 105 

Textile Design and Cloth Con- 
struction D-30 75 


Physical Education 30 

Qualitative Analysis C-lla . . 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Analysis 
D-10 75 

First Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 240 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 135 

First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Con- 
struction D-30 105 

Textile Testing G-31 .... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 

H-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 90 

Second Term 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 

H-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 60 

Thesis. 


26 


Course IV. — Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

The four-year course in Chemistry and Textile Coloring, leading to the degree 
of B.T.C., is especially intended for those who wish to engage in any branch of 
textile chemistry, textile coloring, bleaching, finishing or the manufacture and 
sale of the dyestuffs or chemicals used in the textile industry. The theory and 
practice of all branches of dyeing, printing, bleaching, scouring and finishing are 
taught by lecture work supplemented by a large amount of experimental laboratory 
work and actual practice in the dyehouse and finishing room. 

The underlying theories and principles of chemistry are the same, no matter 
to what industry the application is eventually made. Furthermore, no industry 
involves more advanced and varied applications of the science of chemistry than 
those of the manufacture and application of the coal-tar coloring matters. In 
addition, the textile colorist must consider the complex composition of the textile 
fibers, and the obscure reactions which take place between them and the other 
materials of the textile industry. 

During the first year general chemistry, including both inorganic and organic, 
is taught by lectures and laboratory work, and this is supplemented during the 
second term by qualitative analysis and stoichiometry. 

Advanced inorganic chemistry, as well as advanced organic chemistry, is studied 
during the second and third year as a continuation of the elementary chemistry 
of the first year, and much time is spent upon quantitative analysis, industrial 
chemistry, and textile chemistry and dyeing. 

The foundation work in general chemistry is continued during the third year 
with courses in physical chemistry, organic laboratory work and analytical work. 
The subject of industrial chemistry is introduced, and much time is devoted to 
advanced textile chemistry, dye testing, color matching, calico printing, and woolen, 
worsted and cotton finishing. 

The fourth year is characterized by an endeavor to present certain subjects of a 
more applied nature in such a manner that the student’s reasoning power and 
ability to apply the knowledge gained during the first three years may be developed 
to the fullest extent. The subject of engineering chemistry is introduced, and the 
work in the dyeing and analytical laboratories is applied as far as possible to the 
actual requirements of the factory chemist and colorist. Much time is also spent in 
the organic chemistry laboratory, particular attention being given to the prepara- 
tion of typical dyestuffs. Thorough courses are given in microscopy, photo- 
micrography and the use of various instruments such as the spectroscope, ultra- 
microscope, polariscope, tintometer and other optical instruments applicable to 
experimental work in connection with the textile industry. Courses are also given 
in report writing and textile literature. 

During this fourth year the student has an opportunity to take several optional 
subjects of an advanced nature and conduct such research work and original 
investigation as time may permit. 

For detailed description of the subjects see page 34. 


27 


Course IV. — Chemistry and Textile Coloring 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Advanced German E-21 ... 45 

Adv. Organic Chemistry C-22 . 30 

English E-20 30 

Mathematics B-20a .... 60 

Physics B-23 65 

Power Weaving D-23 .... 15 

Second Year. 

Advanced German E-21 ... 45 

Adv. Organic Chemistry C-22 . 30 

English E-20 30 

Physics B-23 65 

Quantitative Analysis C-23 . .150 

Third Year. 

Adv. Organic Chemistry Lect. 

C-34 15 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-32 135 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-32 30 


Third Year. 


Quantitative Analysis C-23 . . 130 

Stoichiometry C-24 ..... 15 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lab. C-21 90 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C— 20 45 

Second Term 

Stoichiometry C-24 15 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lab. C-21 145 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 45 

First Term 

Economics E-30 45 

Physical Chemistry C-33 ... 45 

Quantitative Analysis C-30 . . 150 

Technical German C-35 ... 30 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 


Second Term 


Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-32 90 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-32 15 

Economics E-30 45 

Industrial Chemistry C-31 . . 30 


Organic Laboratory C-36 . 
Physical Chemistry C-33 . . . 

Quantitative Analysis C-30 
Technical German C-35 
Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 


90 

45 

105 

30 

75 


Fourth Year. 


First Term 


Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-44 75 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-44 30 

Chemical Textile Testing C-43 . 45 

Colloid Chemistry C-50 . . . .30 

Industrial Chemistry C-42 . . 30 

Fourth Year. 
Advanced General Chemistry C-49 30 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lab. C-44 120 

Adv. Textile Chemistry and Dye- 
ing Lect. C-44 15 

Chemical Textile Testing C-43 . 45 

Options or Thesis C-52 ... 90 


Microscopy and Photomicroscopy 

C-45 60 

Options or Thesis C-52 ... 90 

Organic Laboratory C-41 . . .75 

Quantitative Analysis C-46 . . 15 

Report Writing C-47 .... 15 

Technical German C-40 ... 30 

Textile Marketing B-42 . . . 30 

Second Term 

Organic Laboratory C-41 . . . 105 

Rayon Manufacturing C-51 . . 30 

Seminar in Business English E-40 15 
Technical German C-40 ... 30 

Technology of Wool Manufacture 

G-40 15 

Textile Literature C-48 ... 30 


28 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering 

This course is the four-year general textile course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Textile Engineering (B.T.E.), and aims especially to fit men, in the broadest 
possible manner, to meet the increasing demands of every branch of the textile 
industry for men with combined textile and technical preparation. The magni- 
tude and scope of the textile and allied industries fully justify the most thorough 
technical training possible for all who aspire to leadership in this field. 

The student is first thoroughly grounded in those fundamental principles of 
science upon which all industrial and engineering work rests. The foundation of 
his textile and technical training is in the subjects of mathematics, physics, chem- 
istry, drawing, mechanics, mechanism, and technology of fibers, and their practical 
application. 

Instruction is given in all the various branches of textile manufacturing 
through lectures, recitations and laboratory work. A large proportion of his time 
is spent in well-equipped textile departments where he studies and operates all 
of the machinery required in the conversion of cotton and wool fiber into yarns 
and fabrics. This includes cotton, wool and worsted yarn manufacturing, design- 
ing, weaving, knitting, dyeing and finishing. In his last year the course in textile 
testing acquaints the student with the methods for determining the physical 
properties of textile fibers, yarns and fabrics. 

To properly equip the student to meet the varied engineering problems which 
confront the mill manager or executive, or to so train him that he may enter those 
industries closely allied to the textile, instruction is given by lecture and laboratory 
practice in the several branches of engineering. 

Steam engineering considers the problems involved in steam generation and 
distribution for power, heating and manufacturing purposes, and includes the testing 
of laboratory and power plant equipment. The course in electrical engineering 
treats of the generation and transmission of electrical power, the testing of direct 
and alternating current machinery, and is intended to acquaint the student with 
modern practice. 

Mill engineering familiarizes the student with mill design, construction, heating, 
lighting, humidification and fire protection. The arrangement of machinery and 
buildings for most efficient production and economical power distribution is also 
studied in detail. 

The broadening effect of such subjects as English and economics is carried still 
further in this course by carefully planned courses in business administration, ac- 
counting, cost accounting and business law. 

During the fourth year the student is required to conduct an original investiga- 
tion of some textile or allied problem, and to submit the results in the form of a 
satisfactory thesis before receiving his degree. 

For the student who may desire the breadth of technical training which this 
course offers, but who wishes to specialize in either cotton or wool manufacturing, 
two options are offered. In these optional courses the student’s entire textile time 
is devoted to the study of that particular fiber which he elects. Provision is also 
made for the substitution of knitting for weaving laboratory time in the case of 
those who prefer to lay more emphasis on knit fabrics. 

During the past few years a demand has come from the distributing or marketing 
branches of the textile business for men with a four years’ technical training. With 
the idea of offering courses which may better prepare graduates to meet this new 
call, the new Sales Option Course is offered. 

There are also requests for a four-year Design Course which, while majoring in 
Textile Design, includes other subjects that help to make a broader course than 
the one of three years’ duration. For this purpose the Design Option Course is 
offered. Like the other courses outlined, these will be subject to changes to meet 
new demands. 

For detailed description of subjects, see page 34. The curricula of the several 
optional courses will be found on pages 29 to 33. 


29 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (General Course-G) 

[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 

75 

Physics B-23 . . . 

• • • 

75 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 

120 

Textile Chemistry and 

l Dyeing 


Machine Drawing B-21 

45 

Lecture C-20 . . . 


30 

Machine Shop B-26 . . . . 

75 

Textile Design and Cloth Construe- 


Mathematics B-20 

60 

tion D-22 .... 


45 

Second Year. 

Second Term 



Applied Mechanics B-25 . 

45 

Mathematics B-20 . 


60 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 

75 

Physics B-23 . . . 

T 

75 

Electives F-25 


Power Weaving D-24 . 

... 

75 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 

90 

Textile Chemistry and 

1 Dyeing 


Machine Drawing B-21 

75 

Lect. 020 


30 

Third Year. 

First Term 



Applied Mechanics B-30 . . . 

45 

Heat Engineering B-32 

• • • 

75 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Power Weaving D-32 . 


60 

Economics E-30 

45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture 030 

90 

Electives F-35 


Woolen and Worsted 

Finishing 


Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 

75 

H-30 


75 

Third Year. 

Second Term 



Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Mill Engineering B-34 . 

. 

90 

Economics E-30 

45 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture 030 . 

90 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 

75 

Woolen and Worsted 

Finishing 


Heat Engineering B-33 . . . 

90 

H-30 


75 

Fourth 

Year 

. First Term 



Accounting B-40 

90 

Textile Marketing B-42 

• • • 

30 

Cotton Organization F-32 . 

90 

Textile Microscopy B-41 

• • • 

45 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 

68 

Textile Testing B-43 

• • • 

60 

Mill Engineering B-45 .... 

67 

Thesis 


75 

Fourth Year 

Second Term 



Business Administration B-46 . 

90 

Knitting F-31a . . . 


30 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 

105 

Mill Engineering B-45 . 

• • • 

75 

Electives B-48 or F-45 . . . 


Mill Illumination B-47 . 

• • • 

45 

Electrical Engineering^B-44 . . 

75 

Thesis 


105 


30 




Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Cotton Option-C) 
[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yam Manufacture F-20a . 180 
Machine Drawing B-21 ... 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Second Year. 


Applied Mechanics B-25 . . 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a 
Machine Drawing B-21 
Mathematics B-20 .... 
Physics B-23 


45 
135 
45 
60 
75 

Third Year. 

Applied Mechanics B-30 ... 45 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 150 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Third Year. 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 180 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Fourth Year. 

Accounting B-40 90 

Cotton Organization F-32 . . . 105 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 68 

Mill Engineering B-45 .... 30 

Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 105 
Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 75 

Knitting F-31 105 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lecture C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20 90 

Second Term 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 60 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C— 20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20 75 


First Term 
Heat Engineering B-32 
Machine Shop B-26 
Power Weaving D-32 . 

Second Term 
Heat Engineering B-33 
Mill Engineering B-34 . 
Power Weaving D-32 . 

First Term 
Textile Marketing B-42 
Textile Microscopy B-41 
Textile Testing B-43 
Thesis 


Second Term 
Mill Engineering B-45 
Mill Illumination B-47 
Thesis .... 


75 

45 

45 


90 

90 

45 


30 

45 

60 

97 


30 

45 

75 


31 


Course VI.— Textile Engineering (Wool Option-W) 

[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 225 

Machine Drawing B-21 ... 90 

Machine Shop B-26 .... 45 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Second Year. 
Applied Mechanics B-25 ... 45 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 195 

Machine Drawing B-21 ... 45 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Third Year. 

Applied Mechanics B-30 ... 45 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Heat Engineering B-32 ... 75 

Third Year. 

Economics E-30 45 

Electrical Engineering B-31 . . 75 

Heat Engineering B-33 ... 90 

Mill Engineering B-34 .... 90 

Fourth Year. 

Accounting B-40 90 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 68 

Mill Engineering B-45 .... 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 75 

Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Electrical Engineering B-44 . . 75 

Knitting F-31 105 

Mill Engineering B-45 .... 30 


Physics B-23 ...... 75 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lecture C-20 30 

Second Term 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 . . . . 75 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lect. C-20 30 

First Term 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 60 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 150 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 . 150 
Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

First Term 

Textile Marketing B-42 ... 30 

Textile Microscopy B-41 ... 45 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 60 

Thesis 127 

Second Term 

Mill Illumination B-47 .... 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-21 60 

Thesis 120 


32 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Design Option-D) 


[For first year see page 19] 


Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 


Textile Chemistry apd Dyeing 

Lecture C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 210 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C-20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 105 


Third Year. 


First Term 


Color and Dynamic Symmetry 


D— 33 

30 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Economics E-30 

45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

120 

Third Year. 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D— 33 

45 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 

60 

Economics E-30 

45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 

135 

Fourth 

Year, 

Accounting B-40 

90 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 

90 

tion D-41 

90 

Textile Marketing B-42 

30 


Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-33 45 

Cotton Finishing H-31 .... 105 


Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 105 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

First Term 

Textile Microscopy B-41 ... 45 

Textile Styling B-50 .... 30 

Textile Testing B-43 .... 60 

Thesis 60 

Second Term 

Jacquard Design and Weaving D-40 105 
Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-41 90 

Thesis 90 


33 


Course VI. — Textile Engineering (Sales Option-S) 
[For first year see page 19] 

Second Year. First Term. (Hours of Exercise) 


Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Second Year. 
Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-20a . 60 

Fiber Preparation G-20, 21 . . 90 

Mathematics B-20 60 

Physics B-23 75 

Power Weaving D-24 .... 105 

Third Year. 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-33 30 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 75 

Principles of Marketing B-35 . . 45 

Third Year. 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-33 45 

Cotton Yarn Manufacture F-30a . 60 

Economics E-30 45 

Marketing Methods B-36 ... 60 

Power Weaving D-32 .... 30 

Fourth Year. 

Accounting B-40 90 

Principles of Selling and Advertis- 
ing B-49 105 

Selling Policies B-52 .... 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-41 60 

Fourth Year. 
Business Administration B-46 . . 90 

Color and Dynamic Symmetry 

D-33 45 

Gotton Finishing H-31 .... 105 
Foreign Trade and Economic Geog- 
raphy B-51 45 


Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 
Lecture C-20 ..... 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 210 

Second Term 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing 

Lect. C— 20 30 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-20, 21 105 

First Term 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-3Q 105 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
H-30 75 

Second Term 

Statistics 45 

Textile Design and Cloth Construc- 
tion D-30 75 

Worsted Yarn Manufacture G-30 90 

Woolen and Worsted Finishing 
f H-30 75 


First Term 


Textile Microscopy B-41 . . .45 

Textile Styling B-50 .... 30 
Textile Testing B-43 .... 60 
Thesis 90 


Second Term 

Jacquard Design and Weaving 

D-40 30 

Knitting F-31 75 

Selling Policies B-52 .... 45 

Thesis 120 


34 


SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 


TEXTILE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT — B 

The various options are designated by G, C, W, D, S. 

Mathematics — B-10. Preparation: Admission Requirements. The work 
in the first term consists of algebra, plane trigonometry, and instruction in the use 
of the slide-rule. Algebra is reviewed through quadratics and then logarithms are 
taken. In plane trigonometry, right and oblique triangles are solved by means of 
natural and logarithmic functions, and the various algebraic relations among the 
trigonometric functions are proved and used in identities and equations. Significant 
figures and the use of approximate data in calculations are also discussed. 

In the second term the following topics are taken up: graphical and mathematical 
solution of quadratic and simultaneous equations, theory of equations, partial 
fractions, Naperian logarithms, equations of the straight line, equations of various 
curves, differentiation of algebraic functions, and applications of the derivative. 
[All courses.] 

Physics — B-ll. Preparation: Admission Requirements. Taken simul- 
taneously with B-10. This subject is required as a necessary preparation for 
all courses, and is given during the first term of the first year. The fundamental 
principles of this subject are considered absolutely essential to a thorough under- 
standing of the operation of all machinery, textile or otherwise. Some of the topics 
treated in this course are linear and angular velocity, uniform and accelerated 
motion, mass, momentum, inertia, effect of force in producing motion, centrifugal 
force, work, power, energy, principle of moments and its applications, parallelo- 
gram and triangle of forces with applications, resolution and composition of forces, 
the mechanical principles represented by the wheel and axle, differential pulley 
block, common pulley blocks, jackscrew, worm and wheel, inclined plane, hydro- 
statics, elements of hydraulics, kinetic energy, circular motion and harmonic 
motion. 

Laboratory. This course is supplementary to the lecture course and gives the 
student an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in the lecture course by 
performing various experiments. [All courses.] 

Mechanism — B-12. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject is also 
deemed to be one of those absolutely essential to every students preparation for 
the work of the following years. Whereas the principles studied are of general 
application, textile machinery in particular furnishes an unusually large variety 
of specific examples, and frequent reference is made to these in the development 
of the course. Some of the important topics covered are gearing and gear train 
design, belting and pulley calculations, cone and stepped pulley design, cam design, 
linkages, epicyclic gear trains, and intermittent motion devices. [All courses.] 

Mechanical Drawing — B-13. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
Taken simultaneously with B-ll. This course is taken during the first year 
and consists of work in the drawing room supplemented by lectures. This sub- 
ject is considered of the greatest importance as a preparation for the student’s 
future work, and the practical usefulness of drawing of this character is fully 
emphasized. 

This course is systematically laid out covering in order the following divisions : — 
care and use of drawing instruments; lettering; geometrical constructions; ortho- 
graphic projection; isometric projection; cross sections; dimensioning; sketching 
practice on machine details; working drawings; tracing and blueprinting; devel- 
opments with practical application. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Machine Drawing — B-13a. Preparation: Admission Requirements. 
Taken simultaneously with B-ll. This course is similar to B-13, but not so 
extensive, and is given to students electing the Chemistry and Textile Coloring 
course. [Course IV.] 


Mathematics — B-20. Preparation: B-10. This subject is a continuation 
of the first year subject B-10, and extends throughout the second year of the engi- 
neering course. In the first term the following topics are treated: — derivatives 
and differentials, the circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, indefinite integrals, 
summation by integration and applications of integration. In the second term the 


35 

topics are: differentiation of transcendental functions, methods of integration, 
centers of gravity, moments of inertia, empirical formulas, and nomographic 
charts. [Course VI.] 

Mathematics — B-20a. Preparation: B-10. This subject is a continuation 
of the work of the first year subject B-10. A study of the derivatives and differen- 
tials is followed by applications of the differential to rates and errors. Other topics 
treated are the circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, indefinite integrals, summation 
by integration, areas, volumes, pressures, exponential, logarithmic, and trigono- 
metric functions. [Course IV.] 

Machine Drawing — B-21. Preparation: B-10, B-12, B-14. The work in 
Machine Drawing is devoted to working detail drawings of textile machinery and 
advanced graphical mechanism problems. In every case the data for all of these 
problems are taken directly from some of the textile machines that the students use 
in other departments. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Physics — B-23. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject lays the founda- 
tion for later work in engineering and chemistry and also explains the general 
application of the laws and principles of physics. Instruction, consisting of lectures, 
demonstrations, and recitations, is given for three hours per week during the second 
year. The topics taken up the first term are: — wave motion and sound, thermome- 
try, measurement of heat, change of state, expansion, transfer of heat, humidity, 
nature and propagation of light, and photometry. 

The second term is devoted to the study of light, magnetism, and electricity. 
Some of the topics are: — reflection and refraction, lenses, the telescope and micro- 
scope, the spectroscope, color sensation, double refraction, magnetism, electro- 
statics, fundamental laws of direct currents and electrolysis. 

Laboratory. A two-hour period per week for Course VI and a three-hour 
period every alternate week for Course IV accompanies the class work in this 
subject and is planned to illustrate precise methods for measuring various physi- 
cal quantities. [Courses IV, VI.] 

Physics — B-23a. Preparation: B-10 and B-ll. This subject consists of 
the same topics as B-23 but does not contain any laboratory work. [Courses I, 
II, III.] 

Steam Engineering — B-24. Preparation: B-12. This course consists of 
thirty lectures given in the first term of the second year. Its aim is to give those 
students who do not take the Textile Engineering Course a general knowledge of 
thermodynamics, the steam engine, steam turbine and gas engine and their auxili- 
aries, and waste heat reclamation. [Courses I, II, III.] 

Applied Mechanics — B-25. Preparation: B-ll, B-20. This course is 
divided into two parts: Graphic Statics and Strength of Materials. The first eight 
weeks of the semester which is devoted to Graphic Statics consists of the study of 
mathematical and graphical solutions for any system of forces. Centers of gravity 
and funicular polygons are introduced followed by roof and bridge truss problems 
under various conditions of dead, live, wind, and snow loading. 

During the second half of the semester and during all the following semester, 
this course deals with Strength of Materials. So far as time permits, such topics 
as stress, strain, methods of testing materials, bending moments, shearing force, 
beam design, torsion, design of shafts, compound beams and columns, combined 
stresses, and like subjects are considered. 

This subject is preparatory to the work in Mill Engineering of both the third 
and fourth years, at which time its practical value and application are clearly 
demonstrated. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Machine Shop Practice — B-26. Preparation: B-ll and B-12. Systematic 
instruction is given in the most approved methods of machine shop practice, the 
object being to familiarize the student with the proper use of hand and machine 
tools, and the characteristics of the different materials worked. Particular atten- 
tion is given to the form, setting, grinding and tempering of tools and the mecha- 
nism of the different machines involving certain speeds, feeds, etc. The course is so 
planned that the instruction in each typical operation shall conform as nearly as 
possible to commercial machine-shop practice on textile machinery. The list of 


36 

tools which appears under “Equipment” in this Bulletin gives an idea of the scope 
of the work, which includes chipping and filing, tool grinding and tempering, straight 
and taper turning, screw cutting, drilling and boring, planer work, milling machine 
work, including gear cutting. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Applied Mechanics — B-30. Preparation: B-25. This is a continuation 
of Applied Mechanics B-25, and is given during the first term of the third year. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electrical Engineering — B-31. Preparation: B-23. The elementary prin- 
ciples of electricity and magnetism are considered in the lecture course on physics. 
Their development and application are taken up in this course in a detailed study 
of the magnetic and electric circuits during the first period of the first term. The 
second period is devoted to a study of the principles of direct current machinery. 
The laboratory work consists of a study of technical electrical measurements 
and dynamo-electric machinery, determining for the latter their operating charac- 
teristics. 

The second term is devoted entirely to a study of the principles of alternating 
current circuits, including vector representation, effective values, power, series 
and parallel circuits. The laboratory work consists of a study of technical electrical 
measurements, some meter calibration including that of watt-hour meters and a 
study of alternating current circuits using electrical measuring instruments. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electricity — B-31a. Preparation: B-23a. This is a short course given in 
the third year of the manufacturing courses, and consists of thirty lectures covering 
briefly and in a general way the theory of direct and alternating current generators 
and motors. [Courses I, II.] 

Heat Engineering — B-32. Preparation: B-12, B-20. The purpose of this 
course is to familiarize the student with the principles of elementary thermodyna- 
mics, the properties of steam, mechanical mixtures and combustion of fuels. The 
course consists of thirty exercises given in the first term of the third year. The 
lectures and recitations are supplemented with illustrative problems assigned for 
home preparation. 

Laboratory. The principles underlying the subjects of steam engineering, 
hydraulics and thermodynamics are demonstrated in a practical manner in the 
work in the Engineering Laboratory, given three hours per week. Greater im- 
portance is attached to the development of initiative and responsibility in the 
student than the mere accomplishment of a large number of carefully planned 
tests. The character of this work is indicated by the following list of experi- 
ments and tests: — 

Calibration of scales, tanks, gauges, inductors and counters; barrel, separating 
and throttling calorimeter tests; heat exchange tests; boiler inspection and meas- 
urement; flue gas analysis; dynamometer tests; ejector and injector tests; Ran- 
kin's efficiency, actual thermal efficiency and duty tests; expansion of pipes, 
radiation.and pipe covering tests; boiler test; trap tests, feed water heating tests; 
steam, triplex and centrifugal pump tests. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Heat Engineering — B-33. Preparation: B-32. This course is a continua- 
tion of B-32, and consists of forty-five hours of lectures and recitations given in the 
second term of the third year of the Textile Engineering course. The subjects 
developed are the kinematics of reciprocating steam engines, steam turbines and 
gas engines. Special attention is given to the mechanical principles on which the 
steam engine operates, with detail discussion of the valve gear and governing 
devices, and the various diagrams used for studying the same. Consideration is 
given to the underlying heat theory and to the details of construction of the various 
parts of the machines. During the latter part of the course the historical develop- 
ment, classification and types of turbines and gas engines are discussed. 

Laboratory. The character of the work in the Engineering Laboratory, given 
three hours per week during the second half of the third year, is indicated by the 
following list of experiments: — 

Boiler inspection and measurement; Rankin's efficiency, actual thermal effi- 
ciency and duty tests; boiler test; valve setting by measurement and by indi- 
cator; condenser tests; non-condensing and condensing engine and turbine tests; 


37 

heating and ventilating fan tests; lap and butt riveted joint test; nozzle test; gas 
engine test; flow of air and air comprassor tests. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-34. Preparation: B-21, B-25. Mill Engineering, 
as presented in thirty lectures during the third year of the Textile Engineering 
course, consists of a. discussion of the following topics: the investigation of the 
subsoils for the footing course of the foundation; building materials; design of 
walls, beams, floors, and construction of windows, doors, stairways and roofs. 

Sixty hours of drawing-room and laboratory practice are devoted to plane sur- 
veying, contour plotting, cut and fill calculations, setting of batter boards, align- 
ments of shafting and the study from blue-prints of slow-burning construction. 
[Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-34a. Preparation: B-21. Mill Engineering, as 
presented in thirty lectures during the third year of the diploma courses, is largely 
general in its nature and includes only parts of Course B-34. [Courses I, II.] 

Principles of Marketing — B-35. An introduction to the basic principles 
underlying the modern systems of distributing goods with special emphasis on 
the raw and finished products of the textile industry. The course will cover the 
history and economic importance and functions in modern distribution of the 
selling agent, the commission man, the broker, jobber, merchant, factor and other 
intermediaries as well as the channels that goods may take from the producer to 
the ultimate consumer. The importance and advantages of each will be studied 
with special emphasis on the present practice and trends in the textile industry. 

Lectures and the case method of instruction will be employed. [Course VI, Sales 
Option.] 

Marketing Methods — B-36. Preparation: B-35. A continuation of the 
Principles of Marketing. The course will be conducted by means of lectures and 
case problems and discussions. Some of the subjects studied in detail are, — the 
planning of marketing campaigns, the fluctuations of price and style, forecasting, 
the business cycle, quotas, market surveys and research, sales planning and con- 
trol, industrial marketing, and consumer merchandising. 

Considerable time will be devoted to the study of current literature and events 
in the textile field. [Course VI, Sales Option.] 

Accounting — B-40. Preparation: B-10 and E-30. The purpose of this 
course is to acquaint the student with the principles and modern methods of 
accounting for mercantile and manufacturing businesses. It is not intended to 
make him a proficient bookkeeper or accountant, but the nature of the subject 
necessitates a basic knowledge of double-entry bookkeeping, the functions of 
ledger accounts, and of the use of checks, drafts, notes, vouchers, etc., in ordinary 
business transactions. This is developed during the summer preceding the senior 
year by requiring the student to take a course in double-entry bookkeeping, thus 
saving valuable, time during the school year and effectively preparing the ground 
for the instruction work. 

The first half of the course is based on a study of the proper form and content 
of the balance sheet and profit and loss statement, the principles and problems 
involved in the correct valuation of asset and liability items, and the related topics 
of depreciation, reserves, capital, surplus and dividends. 

. The second half of the course is devoted to cost accounting and is planned to 
give the student a knowledge of the best cost methods in use at the present time. 
It includes a thorough discussion of methods of handling and accounting for raw 
materials, direct labor, the distribution of overhead expenses, normal costs and 
their predetermination, budgeting, and cost reports and their use. [Course VI.] 

Textile Microscopy— B^41. Preparation: B-23. This subject consists of 
the study of animal and vegetable fibers by means of the microscope and its acces- 
sories. It includes methods of illumination, sectioning and mounting, drawing 
with the camera lucida, measurements of diameter and twist, precision sectioning, 
and the use of polarized light in the study and identification of fibers. [Course VI. ] 

Textile Marketing— B-42. Preparation: E-30. This subject covers the 
problems of marketing textile products, with particular emphasis upon the ulti- 
mate consumer. The course will survey the principal marketing channels and 


38 

marketing methods. Attention is directed to the possibilities of demand creation 
and demand control, especially through market and style research. Current 
changes in marketing organization of the industry will be studied and reviewed. 
[Courses IV and VI, Options G, C, W, D.] 

Textile Testing — B-43. Preparation: B-23, F-30 or G-30, D-32. This 
course is planned to familiarize the student with the latest methods and devices for 
determining the physical properties and characteristics of textile fibers, yarns and 
fabrics. The scope of the work is indicated by the following topics: abrasion, 
absorptability, atmospheric control, bursting, crimp, heat transmission, porosity, 
regain, resilience, stretch, tear, tensile strength, thickness, twist, waterproofness, 
precision of measurements, interpretation and presentation of data. These are 
treated both from the standpoint of commercial testing and of textile research. 
[Course VI.] 

Electrical Engineering — B-44. Preparation: B-31. During the first 
term a detailed study of the alternator is made, with particular stress on generation 
of three-phase currents. Methods of predetermination of alternator regulation 
are taken up and at least one method compared with laboratory test. Parallel 
operation of alternators with accompanying instruments and devices are studied in 
classroom and laboratory. The single phase, three-phase and Scott transformers 
are considered in turn and their various methods of connecting to line and alter- 
nators are systematically studied. 

In the second term the induction motor and generator are studied with their 
particular adaptability to the textile industry. The principal starting devices for 
this motor are thoroughly taken up. The synchronous motor is studied particularly 
in relation to its ability to correct power factor. In all the work outlined above, 
the main features are illustrated profusely in classroom demonstrations and labor- 
atory exercises. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Mill Engineering — B-45. Preparation: B-34. This subject, given in the 
fourth year of the Textile Engineering course, includes many new topics, and at 
the same time coordinates much of the students previous work in engineering 
with his knowledge of textile processes and their requirements. In detail it takes 
up a study of modern types of mill buildings and problems involved in their con- 
struction. Such matters as factory location, machinery layout, power transmission, 
heating, ventilation, humidification, fire protection and sanitary facilities are also 
discussed. The student is finally assigned the problem of completely designing a 
textile mill building and laying out its machinery and equipment so far as time 
permits. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Business Administration — B-46. Preparation: B-10 and E-30. Recog- 
nizing the importance which executive work plays in the management of an in- 
dustrial enterprise, this course has been placed in the curriculum of the Textile 
Engineering course in order to acquaint the student with some of the fundamental 
problems and principles involved, and possibly to reveal to him some of his own 
capabilities for this type of work. The broad topics considered are types of busi- 
ness organizations, financing, administration, planning, control, personnel, and 
human relationships. The importance of applied psychology to successful manage- 
ment is stressed. The student is made familiar with some of the tools of manage- 
ment such as purchasing systems, storeskeeping, perpetual inventories, warehous- 
ing methods, scheduling, routing, tracing, time keeping, motion studies, time 
studies, mnemonic symbolizing, graphical records, and wage systems. 

Business Law. Under this subject are given lectures, supplemented by the 
use of a suitable text, on the law governing contracts, sales, agency, partner- 
ships, corporations, negotiable, instruments, bailments and carriers, insurance, 
personal property, real property, suretyship and guaranty, and bankruptcy. 
[Course VI.] 

Mill Illumination — B-47. Preparation: B-23. Because of the demand and 
the necessity for proper lighting of textile mills, this course is offered three hours 
per week for one term. It consists of three major parts, — photometry, illumina- 
tion and installation design. Costs and estimates, safety and production are 
included. 


39 

The laboratory exercises include the study and applications of the photometer, 
Macbeth llluminometer and foot-candle meter. The concluding work is a design 
of a lighting installation for a typical mill room, using the school laboratories for 
this purpose. [Course VI, Options G, C, W.] 

Electives — B-48. Students in the second term of the fourth year of the Textile 
Engineering course will be permitted to elect certain textile subjects as substitutes 
for part of the time scheduled for engineering subjects. Thus a student is offered 
an opportunity for specialized study along such lines as will prove most beneficial 
to him at that time. The selection of elective studies is subject to the approval 
of the head of the Textile Engineering department and to the possibility of arrang- 
ing for the same. [Course VI, Option G.] 

Principles of Selling and Advertising — B-49. Preparation: B-36. A 
comprehensive course dealing with the fundamental principles of advertising and 
selling. The course will cover the psychology of selling and advertising, the legal 
restrictions in marketing, advertising technique, copy writing, layout, illustrations, 
advertising campaigns, packaging, advertising mediums, industrial and consumer 
advertising, creative salesmanship, personality, types of customers, the selling 
process, supersalesmanship, etc. 

Lectures and the case method of instruction will be used. [Course VI, Sales 
Option.] 

Textile Styling — B-50. Preparation: B-37, D-30. This course will cor- 
relate the technical knowledge of design, acquired previously, to the fluctuations 
of style design, the creation of fads and the forecasting and planning of styles. 
[Course VI, Options D, S.] 

Foreign Trade and Economic Geography — B-51. Preparation: E-30. 

The course will cover the foreign markets for finished textiles and the American 
raw fibers, methods of selling employed, foreign commercial law that an American 
exporter needs, the foreign fibers and textiles and their importance in international 
trade. 

Special emphasis will be given upon costs of foreign marketing, tariffs, inter- 
national competition, possible markets and methods of building an export business. 
[Course VI, Sales Option.] 

Selling Policies — B-52. Preparation: B-49. This course will cover the 
development of administrative policies and guiding principles in the marketing, 
pricing, styling and merchandising of textiles and textile fibers. [Course VI, 
Sales Option.] 

Statistics — B-53. Preparation: B-20. A study of elementary statistics 
which relate to industry, trade and general business and financial conditions. It 
includes the analysis, presentation and interpretation of statistical data, index 
numbers, correlation, law of error, cyclical fluctuations, dispersion, trend and other 
pertinent topics. [Course VI, Sales Option.] 

CHEMISTRY AND DYEING DEPARTMENT— C 

Elementary Chemistry (Inorganic and Organic Chemistry) — C-10. 
Preparation: Admission Requirements. Instruction in Inorganic Chemistry 
extends through the first year, and includes lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work. The subject of Organic Chemistry is covered by lectures during the second 
term. 

Elementary Inorganic Chemistry 

During the first term of the first year, the class work in this course consists of 
three lectures, and one recitation per week on fundamental principles, and de- 
scriptive chemistry of the non-metallic elements and their compounds. This is 
accompanied by one afternoon per week of laboratory work, w r hich may be on 
either inorganic preparations or qualitative analysis, according to the previous 
laboratory training of the individual student. 

In the second term, one lecture and one recitation per week are devoted to 
the metals and their compounds, and one afternoon per week wholly to quali- 
tative analysis, listed below as C-ll. 


40 

Elementary Organic Chemistry 

This course includes a general survey of the fundamental principles of Organic 
Chemistry, also a study of the hydrocarbons and their derivatives from the point 
of view of their structure, preparation and uses. This work, although elementary 
in character, is of sufficient breadth to prepare the student understanding^ for 
the general lectures upon coal-tar dyestuffs which are given in Course C-20. 
[All courses.] 

Qualitative Analysis — C-ll. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. 
This is a continuation of the laboratory study of inorganic compounds, with 
application to their systematic analysis. It is given ten hours per week to chemists 
during the second term of the first year. Students with adequate preparation 
can make further progress by starting this work in place of elementary laboratory 
exercises during the first term, as indicated under C-10. 

When sufficiently advanced, students take up the examination of various products 
with which the textile chemist must be familiar such as testing mordanted cloths, 
pigments and the various dyeing reagents. [Course IV.] 

Qualitative Analysis — C-lla. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. 

This course is similar to C-ll, but not so extensive, being given three hours per 
week during the second term. [Courses I, II, III, VI.] 

Stoichiometry — C-12. Preparation: C-10, taken simultaneously. Two 
hours per week during the second term of the first year, on the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying calculations of quantitative analysis, on the gas laws, and on 
balancing of chemical equations. [Course IV.] 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing — C-20. Preparation: C-10, B-12, B-14. 

The outline of the lecture course which is given during the second year is as 
follows: — 

Technology of Vegetable Fibers. — Cotton, linen, jute, hemp, china grass. 
Chemical and physical properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, 
and their action with chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Animal Fibers. — Wool, mohair, silk. Chemical and physical 
properties, chemical compositions, microscopical study, and their action with 
chemicals, acids, alkalies and heat. 

Technology of Artificial Fibers. — Study of the various forms of artificial 
silk, the process of manufacture, their properties and action with chemicals, acids 
and heat. 

Operations Preliminary to Dyeing. — Bleaching of cotton and linen; wool- 
scouring; bleaching, fulling and felting of w*ool; carbonizing; silk-scouring and 
bleaching; action of soap. 

The bleaching of cotton cloth, yarn and raw stock is studied at length with 
detailed description of the various forms of kiers and machinery used; also the 
action of the chemicals used upon the material, and the various precautions that 
must be taken in order to insure successful work. 

Under this heading is also included an exhaustive study of the reagents used in 
the emulsive wool-scouring process, and their action upon the fiber under various 
conditions; also the most successful of the solvent methods for degreasing wool. 

Water and its Application in the Textile Industry. — Impurities present, 
methods for detection, their effect during the different operations of bleaching, 
scouring, dyeing and printing and the methods used for their removal or correction. 

The important subject of boiler waters is also studied under this heading, with 
a full discussion of the formation of boiler scale, its disastrous results, and the 
methods by winch it may be prevented. 

Mordants and Other Chemical Compounds Used in Textile Coloring 
and Classified as Dyestuffs. — Theory of mordants, their chemical properties 
and application, aluminum mordants, iron mordants, tin mordants, chromium 
mordants, organic mordants, tannin materials, soluble oil, fixing agents, leveling 
agents, assistants, and numerous other compounds, not dyestuffs, that are ex- 
tensively used in the textile industry. 

Under this heading are included the definitions of various terms and classes 
of compounds used by textile colorists, such as color lakes, pigments, fixing 


41 

agents, developing agents, mordanting assistants, mordanting principles and 
leveling agents. 

Theory of Dyeing. — A discussion of the chemical, mechanical, solution and 
absorption theories, and the various views that have been advanced by different 
investigators of the chemistry and physics of textile coloring processes. 

Under this heading are discussed the general methods of classifying dyestuffs 
and the definitions of such terms as textile coloring, dyeing, textile printing, sub- 
stantive and adjective dyestuffs, monogenetic and polygenetic dyestuffs. 

Natural Organic Coloring Matters.— Properties and application of indigo, 
logwood, catechu or cutch, Brazil wood, cochineal, fustic, turmeric, madder, 
quercitron bark, Persian berries, and other natural dyestuffs that have been used 
within recent years by textile colorists. 

Mineral Coloring Matters. — Under this heading are discussed the proper- 
ties of such inorganic coloring matters and pigments as chrome yellow, orange 
and green, Prussian blue, manganese brown and iron buff. 

Artificial Coloring Matters. — General discussion of their history, nature, 
source, methods of manufacture, methods of classification and their application 
to all fibers. 

Special study of basic coloring matters, phthalic anhydride colors, including the 
eosins and phloxines; acid dyestuffs, Janus, direct cotton, sulphur and mordant 
colors, including the alizarines and other artificial coloring matter requiring me- 
tallic mordants; mordant acid and insoluble azo colors, developed on the fiber; 
reduction vat colors, aniline black and other artificial dyestuffs not coming under 
the above heads. 

As each class of dyestuffs is taken up, the details of the methods of applying 
them upon all the different classes of fabrics and in all the different forms of 
dyeing machines are thoroughly discussed; also the difficulties which may arise 
in their application, and the methods adopted for overcoming them. 

Machinery Used in Dyeing. — A certain amount of time is devoted to the 
description of the machinery used in various processes of textile coloring which 
is supplemented as far as possible by the use of charts, diagrams and lantern 
slides. 

Most of the important types of dyeing machines are installed within the dye- 
house of the school, and the students can be taken directly from the lecture room 
and shown the machines in actual operation. [All courses.] 

Dyeing Laboratory — C-21. Preparation: C-20 taken simultaneously. 
Besides lectures and recitations upon the subject of Textile Chemistry and Dyeing, 
practical laboratory work is required. By the performance of careful and syste- 
matic experiments the student learns the nature of the various classes of dyestuffs 
and their coloring properties, their action under various circumstances, and the 
conditions under which they give the best results. The more representative dye- 
stuffs of each class are applied to cotton, wool, silk and the various types of rayon, 
and each student is obliged to enter, in an especially arranged sample book, a 
specimen of each of his dye trials with full particulars as to the conditions of ex- 
periment, percentage of compounds used, time, temperature of dye bath, etc. 

For convenience and economy most of the dye trials are made upon small skeins 
or swatches of the required materials, but from time to time students are required 
to dye larger quantities in the full-sized dyeing machines whic